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2006 NewsTrain Program in Honolulu

APME NewsTrain/Honolulu

Full Program

August 9 - 10, 2006

The Associated Press Managing Editors and the Committee of Concerned Journalists present this NewsTrain workshop. This national training program emphasizes the development of editing and management skills in frontline editors and broadcast news managers.

Workshop Location:
The University of Hawaii at Manoa
School of Architecture
2410 Campus Rd.
Honolulu

With special thanks to the local partners who helped plan and promote this workshop:
The Honolulu Advertiser, Honolulu Star-Bulletin, The Associated Press/ Hawaii, The University of Hawaii, Pacific Business News and The Maui News.

NewsTrain receives major funding from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Wednesday, August 9:
8:30 a.m. Registration
Room 205, 2d floor
9:00 a.m. Welcome and Introductions
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205
9:30 a.m. A Media Law Update
Learn about key changes in the public-records and libel laws in Hawaii that affect your ability to cover the news.
An examination of the changing scope of First Amendment law; access; subpoenas, and privacy. The bigger question: How hard is it to be a journalist in 2006?
Presenter: Jeffrey Portnoy, an attorney and partner in the firm of Cades Schutte, Honolulu
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205
10:45 a.m. Break
11:00 a.m. Exploring innovations in online news
Why: Because the future is here
No longer the step-child, online news operations are becoming full partners in the news organization. This session will explore the fundamental differences between digital and newsprint news and the opportunities for journalists to participate in the creation of new reader experiences online. Learn what the research says about who the online readers; how they use news Web sites, and when they are using your site.
Presenter: Nora Paul, Director, Institute for New Media Studies at the University of Minnesota
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205
12:30 p.m. Lunch
Location: Food will be served inside. You are welcome to enjoy the fresh air and eat picnic style in The Quadrangle.
1:15 p.m. Coaching Your Writers
Why: The best editing occurs before a single word is written.
Editors need to get involved early, talk about ideas, discuss the likely paths the story could take, the diverse sources that could be contacted. Learn how to ask the right questions; how to have difficult conversations about stories; and how to get writers to be better editors of their own work. Includes a discussion of how editors can make every word count.
Presenter: Michael Roberts, deputy managing editor, The Arizona Republic
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205

-- OR --

Giving Effective Feedback
Why: It's essential to helping staffers grow
Learn why it's important to tie your feedback to key goals. Learn how to structure a difficult conversation; words and phrases that will get through to the listener, and the importance of practicing those conversations beforehand. Learn how to listen effectively, respond to feedback, and look for clues that the other person is really listening to you.
Presenter: Edward Miller, managing director, Newsroom Leadership Group
Location: Room 215, 2d floor
2:45 p.m. Break
3:00 p.m. Editing Common Story Forms
Why: It will help you discuss story organization with your writers
Beyond the inverted pyramid, there are several story forms that editors working with reporters can use to shape and focus stories. This segment will cover three, with examples and a chance for editors to apply the forms to their own story ideas.
Presenter: Michael Roberts
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205

-- OR --

Time-Management Techniques
Why: To keep the day from getting away from you
Middle managers get on a treadmill on Monday morning and get off five days later. They spend their days answering to bosses, directing reporters, answering the phone, reading faxes and keeping abreast of the news. They're juggling a dozen balls at a time. Getting time to think is a luxury. You'll learn how to set priorities; how to create small blocks of time for important projects, and techniques to stop from being nibbled to death by phone calls and email. You'll also learn the importance of helping reporters better manage their time.
Presenter: Edward Miller
Location: Room 215
4:00 p.m. Break
4:15 p.m. Where do the best story ideas come from?
A discussion of how to develop systems in print and broadcast newsrooms that encourage a steady flow of fresh ideas. Learn how to stop the feast or famine approach to news coverage.
Presenter: Walter Dean, broadcast training coordinator, Committee of Concerned Journalists
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205
5:30 p.m. End of first day

Thursday, August 10:
8:00 a.m. Continental breakfast available
Location: Outside the Auditorium
8:30 a.m. Welcome back and announcements
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205
8:45 a.m. Non-Traditional Story Forms
Why: Because readers like them
A discussion of the many options editors have to convey information in forms other than a traditional story. Includes many examples, and the reporting and writing approaches needed to create them.
Presenter: Michael Roberts
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205

-- OR --

Managing in a Time of Change
Why: It is not just the news that changes every day
Nothing seems the same as it did last year, and your work-life sometimes feels utterly different from when you started your journalism career. Whether it is access to public information, new technology, HR regulations or a new corporate owner, everything seems to change constantly. You can become more adept at dealing with this strain on your own psyche and the newsroom's. Learn how to cope with the changing landscape, how to lead change and how to stay true to your values in a swiftly shifting environment.
Presenter: Edward Miller
Location: Room 215
10:00 a.m. Break
10:15 a.m. Giving Effective Feedback (repeat)
Why: It's essential to helping staffers grow
Learn why it's important to tie your feedback to key goals. Learn how to structure a difficult conversation; words and phrases that will get through to the listener, and the importance of practicing those conversations beforehand. Learn how to listen effectively, respond to feedback, and look for clues that the other person is really listening to you.
Presenter: Edward Miller
Location: Room 215

-- OR --

Bias in News Coverage
Why: Because credibility is the franchise
An interactive presentation about the notion of bias and the lost meaning of objectivity that may help clear up confusion for editors and the public about the goals and responsibilities of journalists and their news organizations.
Presenter: Wally Dean
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205
11:15 a.m. Break
11:30 a.m. Training: Get on Board
Why: Because newspapers are a business, too
A discussion of why some news organizations are putting more emphasis on professional development of their staffers. Resources you can use to get valuable training for yourself and push for more training for those you lead. Take a virtual tour of a new e-learning site, News University at Poynter.
Presenter: Lillian Swanson, NewsTrain, project director
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205
12:15 p.m. Lunch and a conversation with Chris Lee
Chris is director of the University of Hawaii's Academy for Creative Media and executive producer of the movie "Superman Returns." Please eat lunch outside and return to the Auditorium by 12:45 p.m. for a conversation with Chris Lee.
1:30 p.m. Time-Management Techniques (repeat)
Why: To keep the day from getting away from you
Middle managers get on a treadmill on Monday morning and get off five days later. They spend their days answering to bosses, directing reporters, answering the phone, reading faxes and keeping abreast of the news. They're juggling a dozen balls at a time. Getting time to think is a luxury. You'll learn how to set priorities; how to create small blocks of time for important projects, and techniques to stop from being nibbled to death by phone calls and email. You'll also learn the importance of helping reporters better manage their time.
Presenter: Edward Miller
Location: Room 215

-- OR --

The five-minute editor
Why: On some days, it's all the time you have
Most editors promise themselves that they will have weekly brainstorming meetings on story ideas, frequent coaching sessions on writing techniques and daily post-story critiques to identify and reinforce the lessons learned. Those are worthy goals, but for many editors, the daily grind gets in the way. You do, however, talk to your reporters every day, a minute here, a couple minutes there, five minutes when it's really important. Learn the keys to giving directions and feedback clearly and quickly and other strategies to help you make the most use of your limited time.
Presenter: Michael Roberts
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205
2:30 p.m. Break
2:45 p.m. New Media Convergence
Why: Because the future is here
Explore strategies for generating hyper-local content on your news Web site, appealing to new and younger readers, getting buy-in from the newsroom and delivering content in ways you've probably never imagined. With lots of examples from papers of all sizes. Tips that will help you jump start your own web site.
Presenter: Rob Curley, director of New Media and Convergence for the Naples Daily News
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205
4:30 p.m. NewsTrain Caboose
Taking the lessons home, feedback forms and final thoughts.
Presenter: Lillian Swanson
Location: The Architecture Auditorium, Room 205
4:45 p.m. End of workshop

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APME is a professional network, a resource for helping editors and broadcasters improve their news coverage and newsroom operations.

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