Print Page | Contact Us | Your Cart | Sign In | Register
2006 NewsTrain in Kansas City

APME NewsTrain/Kansas City

Full Program

September 27 - 28, 2006

The Associated Press Managing Editors and the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation sponsor this national workshop for mid-level editors and broadcast news managers. The program emphasizes practical help that can be used on the job right away. NewsTrain receives major funding from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Workshop location:
    Liberty Memorial Museum
    100 West 26th St.
    Kansas City, MO 64108
Special thanks to our local partners: The Kansas City Star; The Associated Press/ Kansas and Missouri; Columbia Daily Tribune; KSHB-TV; KMOV-TV; KOMU-TV; the University of Missouri School of Journalism, and the Missouri Press Association.

Program Note: During part of the workshop, the group will be divided into two teams, Broadcast and Print, to provide specialized training opportunities. Other parts of the program will offer combined classes for Print and Broadcast journalists.

Wednesday, September 27:
10:00 a.m. Registration
Location: Museum Lobby
10:30 a.m. Welcome and Introductions
Lillian Swanson, APME NewsTrain project director, and Deborah Potter, executive director, NewsLab
Location: Auditorium
11:00 a.m. Encouraging Enterprise (broadcast)
Why: It's frustrating and exhausting when reporters don't come up with their own story ideas.
Learn story-finding techniques you can share with reporters and photographers, and consider systems and structures that will help your newsroom break old habits. This workshop also looks at a variety of approaches to beat reporting, and ways that assignment editors can assist reporters without doing all their work for them.
Presenter: Chip Mahaney, managing editor, KDFW-TV
Location: Classroom
11:00 a.m. Coaching Writers (print)
Why: More talk leads to an easier edit
You'll learn how to coach rather than just fix stories on deadline. We explore a five-step approach to coaching writers that involves reporters and editors working together throughout the entire story process, discussing ideas, focus, reporting, organization, structure and prose.
Presenter: Jack Hart, managing editor, The Oregonian
Location: Conference room
12:30 p.m. Lunch
Location: Auditorium lobby
1:15 p.m. Digging Deeper (broadcast and print)
Why: Because you will get better stories
Investigative Reporters & Editors offers tips and strategies for effectively using the FOI Act for daily and long-term projects. You'll see examples of how newsrooms and radio and television stations elsewhere have used open-records laws to report high-impact stories. With plenty of checklists on the types of documents and databases to seek.
Presenter: Brant Houston, executive director, Investigative Reporters and Editors
Location: Auditorium

-- OR --
1:15 p.m. Learning To Do More With Less (print)
Why: Because it's a fact of life for most of us
As newspaper resources shrink, bosses are demanding more from mid-level editors and their staffs. Work smarter and faster, the boss says. But how? In this segment, we'll look at how to swiftly spot a story's strengths and weaknesses; how to zoom in on a buried lead; how to recognize which elements are missing from a story, and how to quickly spot trims. What do you do as a editor when you have 20 minutes to review a story? Ten? Five? One?
Presenter: Rosalie Stemer, newsroom coach
Location: Conference room
2:15 p.m. Coffee Break
2:30 p.m. Coaching Better Storytelling (broadcast)
Why: When stories don't quite turn out as advertised, it's sometimes because they just weren't well organized.
Learn how to help reporters and photographers get the most out of the stories they cover, by helping them focus, plan and revise their work. Consider whether your newsroom systems support or thwart good storytelling.
Presenter: Deborah Potter
Location: Classroom
2:30 p.m. Giving Effective Feedback (print)
Why: It's essential to helping staffers grow
Learn why it's important to tie your feedback to key goals. Learn how to structure a difficult conversation; words and phrases that will get through to the listener, and the importance of practicing those conversations beforehand. Learn how to listen effectively, respond to feedback, and look for clues that the other person is really listening to you.
Presenter: Butch Ward, distinguished fellow, The Poynter Institute
Location: Conference room
4:00 p.m. Time Management (broadcast)
Why: To keep the day from getting away from you.
Middle managers get on a treadmill Monday morning and get off five days later. They spend their days answering to bosses, directing reporters and producers, answering the phone, reading email or faxes and keeping abreast of the news. They're juggling a dozen balls at a time. Getting time to think is a luxury. Is it any wonder that frontline news managers burn out? You'll learn how to set priorities, when and what to delegate and how to help those around you better manage their time.
Presenter: Chip Mahaney
Location: Classroom
4:00 p.m. A Dozen Ways to Reach Readers (print)
Why: Alternative story forms create variety that appeals to your readers
Newspapers are using more and more non-traditional story forms to convey information to readers. This seminar demonstrates how to exploit a variety of creative alternatives to columns of prose.
Presenter: Jack Hart
Location: Conference room
5:00 p.m. Coffee Break
5:15 p.m. Leading in a Time of Change (print and broadcast)
Why: It is not just the news that changes every day
Nothing seems the same as it did last year, and your work-life sometimes feels utterly different from when you started your journalism career. Whether it is access to public information, new technology, HR regulations or a new corporate owner, everything seems to change constantly. You can become more adept at dealing with this strain on your own psyche and the newsroom's. Learn how to cope with the changing landscape, how to lead change and how to stay true to your values in a swiftly shifting environment.
Presenter: Butch Ward
Location: Auditorium
6:15 p.m. End of the first day

Thursday, September 28:
8:00 a.m. Continental breakfast available
Coffee, juice and breakfast muffins
Newspapers courtesy of the Kansas City Star
Location: Auditorium lobby
8:30 a.m. Welcome back & announcements
Location: Auditorium
8:45 a.m. Rethinking news in a 24/7 world (print and broadcast)
Why: Because the future is here
The winners in the great digital news shakeout of the early 21st century will be those who understand how to take advantage of the unique attributes of the different media. Learn how some news organizations are collaborating to take advantage of this new world.
Presenters: Dan Cox, director of World Online in Lawrence, Kansas, and Cody Howard, news director, 6News Lawrence
Location: Auditorium
10:00 a.m. Coffee Break
10:15 a.m. Conflict Resolution (broadcast)
Why: Because conflict is inevitable in a newsroom
Learn the key steps to resolving a conflict, whether it is over a story or a vacation request denied. Learn strategies for defusing an emotional situation and preserving the work relationship. See the benefits of collaboration over perpetual turf wars, and help others to see them, too.
Presenter: Marci Burdick, vice president, Schurz Communication
Location: Classroom
10:15 a.m. The changing newsroom (print)
Part 1: Your changing role

We are challenged with finite resources and shifting priorities as we put out a daily newspaper while incorporating today's technologies, serving up news and information 24-7. Explore the possibilities and ramifications when hyper-local content meets interactive platforms. Discover how to establish priorities in an evolving digital world with minute-by-minute deadlines.
Presenter: David Ledford, executive editor, The Wilmington News Journal
Location: Auditorium

Part 2: Using new media tools (print)
Why: Because it's never been easier to publish a site rich in multimedia content.
We'll get you jump started toward a better online site. From building simple slide shows to gathering and posting audio to producing your own Web casts quickly - we'll show you some of the tools available and how easy it is to use them. Plenty of tip sheets and show-and-tell.
Presenter: Deb Wenger, professor in the School of Mass Communications at Virginia Commonwealth University, and a broadcaster with a specialty in new media convergence.
Location: Auditorium
Noon Training: Get on Board (print and broadcast)
Why: Because journalism is a business, too
A discussion of how and why some news organizations are putting more emphasis on professional development of their staffs. Resources you can use to get valuable training for yourself and push for more training for those you lead. Take a virtual tour of a new e-learning site, News University at Poynter.
Presenters: Lillian Swanson and Deborah Potter
Location: Auditorium
12:30 p.m. Lunch & A conversation with Bill Self (print and broadcast)
Bill Self, Kansas University's head basketball coach, on the secrets of leading a talented team.
Location: Auditorium lobby
2:00 p.m. Skeptical Editing
How to Fine Tune Your Baloney Detector (print)

Why: Because credibility is the franchise
Recently several newspapers announced they published stories that were inaccurate. As stories move through a newsroom, they develop a life of their own. What they need are clear-eyed skeptics who zero in on weaknesses. This session will cover how to edit skeptically, how to challenge the numbers as well as the words and how to activate your baloney detector.
Presenter: Rosalie Stemer, newsroom editing coach
Location: Conference room
2:00 p.m. Reporting in Real Time (broadcast)
Writing for online:

Writing in inverted pyramid and broadcast styles are good starting points for writing for online. But to use the Web to great advantage, editors must know who their Web audiences are, what they find compelling and when they are likely to be reading what. Also, you'll learn secrets to headline writing and captions.
Presenter: Deb Wenger
Location: Auditorium
3:15 p.m. Coffee Break
3:30 p.m. Giving Effective Feedback (broadcast)
Why: It's essential to helping staffers grow
Learn a five-step process that helps you get your message across effectively. Know words and phrases that will get through to the listener, how to structure the conversation, what not to say or do. Discover how to best deliver both positive and negative feedback. Learn how to listen effectively, respond to feedback, and look for clues that the other person is really listening to you.
Presenter: Marci Burdick
Location: Classroom
3:30 p.m. Reporting in Real Time (print)
Writing for online:
Writing in inverted pyramid and broadcast styles are good starting points for writing for online. But to use the Web to great advantage, editors must know who their Web audiences are, what they find compelling and when they are likely to be reading what. Also, you'll learn best practices for writing online headlines and captions, as well as the secrets to successful blogs.
Presenter: Deb Wenger
Location: Auditorium
5:00 p.m. NewsTrain Caboose
Taking the lessons home, feedback forms and goodbyes
Presenters: Lillian Swanson & Deborah Potter
Location: Auditorium
5:30 p.m. End of NewsTrain

Associated Press Media Editors

APME is a professional network, a resource for helping editors and broadcasters improve their news coverage and newsroom operations.

Quick Links

Home About News Events

Connect