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2006 NewsTrain Program in Portland

APME NewsTrain/Portland

Full Program

April 5 - 7, 2006

The Associated Press Managing Editors and the Radio-Television News Directors Foundation sponsor this national workshop for mid-level editors and broadcast news producers. The program emphasizes practical help editors and news producers can use on the job right away. NewsTrain receives major funding from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Workshop location: Portland State University
Smith Memorial Student Union
1825 SW Broadway

Special thanks to our local planners: The Oregonian in Portland; The Associated Press/Oregon; KGW-TV in Portland; KVAL-TV in Eugene; KOMO-TV in Seattle; The Statesman Journal in Salem; the University of Oregon's School of Journalism and Communication, and the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Program note: This NewsTrain program offers two days of training for print editors (Wednesday, April 5, and Thursday, April 6) and one day for broadcast news managers (Friday, April 7). Participants can attend any or all days.
We randomly divide the print editors into two teams, Green and Blue, to reduce class size. Each editing and management segment is offered twice so it's possible to attend each of these segments. On Friday, broadcast news managers will meet as one group.

Wednesday, April 5:
10:00 a.m. Registration
10:30 a.m. Welcome and Introductions
11:00 a.m. Coaching Writers (Green Team)
Why: It's an effective way to edit
How to coach rather than fix stories. A five-step approach to coaching writers that involves reporters and editors working together throughout the entire story process, discussing ideas, focus, reporting, organization, structure and prose.
Presenter: Michael Roberts, deputy managing editor and writing
coach, The Arizona Republic

- OR -
11:00 a.m. Resolving conflicts & giving effective feedback (Blue Team)
Why: Because your integrity is on the line
Learn key steps to resolving a conflict. Learn strategies for defusing an emotional situation and preserving the work relationship. Learn how to get your messages across effectively as you tie your feedback to your key goals.
Presenter: Kristin Gilger, director of student media at Arizona State University and former deputy managing editor, The Arizona Republic
1:00 p.m. Lunch
1:45 p.m. The five-minute editor (Green Team)
Why: On some days, it's all the time you have
Most editors promise themselves that they will have weekly brainstorming meetings on story ideas, frequent coaching sessions on writing techniques and daily post-story critiques to identify and reinforce the lessons learned. Those are worthy goals, but for many editors, the daily grind gets in the way. You do, however, talk to your reporters every day, a minute here, a couple minutes there, five minutes when it's really important. Learn the keys to giving directions and feedback clearly and quickly and other strategies to help you make the most use of your limited time.
Presenter: Michael Roberts

- OR -
1:45 p.m. Creating a Constructive Culture (Blue Team)
Why: Because it sets the tone
A newsroom's culture is part climate, part custom and part values. A negative culture can undermine the newsroom's best efforts to produce good journalism. Learn how to assess your newsroom's culture, and how you can help create a more constructive atmosphere.
Presenter: Kristin Gilger
2:45 p.m. Coffee Break
3:00 p.m. Coaching Writers (Blue Team)
Why: It's an effective way to edit
How to coach rather than fix stories. A five-step approach to coaching writers that involves reporters and editors working together throughout the entire story process, discussing ideas, focus, reporting, organization, structure and prose.
Presenter: Michael Roberts

- OR -
3:00 p.m. Resolving conflicts & giving effective feedback (Green Team)
Why: Because your integrity is on the line
Learn key steps to resolving a conflict. Learn strategies for defusing an emotional situation and preserving the work relationship. Learn how to get your messages across effectively as you tie your feedback to your key goals.
Presenter: Kristin Gilger
5:00 p.m. Coffee Break
5:15 p.m. The five-minute editor (Blue Team)
Why: On some days, it's all the time you have
Most editors promise themselves that they will have weekly brainstorming meetings on story ideas, frequent coaching sessions on writing techniques and daily post-story critiques to identify and reinforce the lessons learned. Those are worthy goals, but for many editors, the daily grind gets in the way. You do, however, talk to your reporters every day, a minute here, a couple minutes there, five minutes when it's really important. Learn the keys to giving directions and feedback clearly and quickly and other strategies to help you make the most use of your limited time.
Presenter: Michael Roberts

- OR -
5:15 p.m. Creating a Constructive Culture (Green Team)
Why: Because it sets the tone
A newsroom's culture is part climate, part custom and part values. A negative culture can undermine the newsroom's best efforts to produce good journalism. Learn how to assess your newsroom's culture, and how you can help create a more constructive atmosphere.
Presenter: Kristin Gilger
6:15 p.m. End of first day

Thursday, April 6:
8:00 a.m. Continental breakfast available
Coffee, juice and breakfast muffins.
Newspapers courtesy of The Oregonian.
8:30 a.m. Welcome back & announcements
8:45 a.m. Non-traditional story forms (Blue Team)
Why: Because different readers appreciate different kinds of stories.
Newspapers are using more and more non-traditional or alternative story forms to quickly convey information to readers. These forms include a variety of infographics, grids, "charticles," lists, annotated photos and other creative alternatives to columns of prose. A sampler of several dozen non-traditional forms and a chance to create packages using different forms.
Presenter: Michael Roberts

- OR -
8:45 a.m. Covering the New America (Green Team)
Why: Because the demographics have changed dramatically
We are in the midst of one of the great stories of our lives - a profound change in who makes up our cities; our suburbs; our state, and our country. Once again, the world has come to America. This great wave of immigrants will have long-term implications for our labor force; schools; the types of industries that will spring up; the kinds of stores that will open; how much we will pay in taxes, and who will pay for our Social Security. A session with plenty of facts, figures and a chance to talk about story ideas.
Presenter: "Bobbi" Bowman, diversity director, American Society of Newspaper Editors

- AND -

Mining Secrets from the FOI Act (Green Team)
Why: Because it's key to watchdog reporting
Investigative Reporters & Editors offers tips and strategies for effectively using the FOI Act for daily and long-term projects. You'll see examples of how newsrooms elsewhere have used open records laws to report high-impact stories. Checklists on the types of documents and databases to seek.
Presenter: Steve Suo, reporter, The Oregonian.
10:45 a.m. Coffee Break
11:00 a.m. Training: Get on Board
Why: Because newspapers are a business, too
A discussion of how and why some news organizations are putting more emphasis on professional development of their staffs. Resources you can use to get valuable training for yourself and push for more training for those you lead. Take a virtual tour of a new e-learning site, News University at Poynter.
Presenter: Lillian Swanson, APME NewsTrain project director
11:30 p.m. A conversation with Sandy Rowe
Sandy Rowe, editor of The Oregonian, talks about her views of newsroom leadership during difficult times.
12:15 p.m. Lunch
Presenter: Mike Davis, former White House photographer and currently on the photo staff at The Oregonian, shows his historic photos and discusses elements of visual storytelling.
1:15 p.m. Rethinking news in the 24/7 news world
Why: Because the future is here
The winners in the great digital news shakeout of the early 21st century will be those who understand how to take advantage of the unique attributes of the different media, and how to make the lives of news consumers less complicated. The question is whether newspapers, in particular, are evolving quickly enough. We'll discuss some practical ways individual editors can make a difference in their newsrooms.
Presenter: Ken Sands, online publisher, SpokesmanReview.com
3:00 p.m. Coffee Break
3:15 p.m. Non-traditional story forms (Green Team)
Why: Because different readers appreciate different kinds of stories.
Newspapers are using more and more non-traditional or alternative story forms to quickly convey information to readers. These forms include a variety of infographics, grids, "charticles," lists, annotated photos and other creative alternatives to columns of prose. A sampler of several dozen non-traditional forms and a chance to create packages using different forms.
Presenter: Michael Roberts

- OR -
3:15 p.m. Covering the New America (Blue Team)
Why: Because the demographics have changed dramatically
We are in the midst of one of the great stories of our lives - a profound change in who makes up our cities; our suburbs; our state, and our country. Once again, the world has come to America. This great wave of immigrants will have long-term implications for our labor force; schools; the types of industries that will spring up; the kinds of stores that will open; how much we will pay in taxes, and who will pay for our Social Security. A session with plenty of facts, figures and a chance to talk about story ideas.
Presenter: "Bobbi" Bowman

- AND -

Mining Secrets from the FOI Act (Blue Team)
Why: Because it's key to watchdog reporting
Investigative Reporters & Editors offers tips and strategies for effectively using the FOI Act for daily and long-term projects. You'll see examples of how newsrooms elsewhere have used open records laws to report high-impact stories. Checklists on the types of documents and databases to seek.
Presenter: Steve Suo
5:15 p.m. Print NewsTrain Caboose
Taking the lessons home, feedback forms and goodbyes
Presenter: Lillian Swanson
5:30 p.m. End of 2nd day

Friday, April 7 (broadcast day):
8:00 a.m. Registration
Continental breakfast available
9:00 a.m. Welcome and introductions

Creating a Constructive Culture
Why: Because it sets the tone
A newsroom's culture is part climate, part custom and part values. A negative culture can undermine the newsroom's best efforts to produce good journalism. Learn how to assess your newsroom's culture, and how you can help create a more constructive atmosphere.
Presenter: Chuck Samuels, news director, WHAM-TV, Rochester, NY
10:30 a.m. Coffee break
10:45 a.m. Motivation and Morale
Why: Because it underlies all action
Different people are motivated differently. Learn how to tap into what motivates your staff, move them to do their best work and avoid actions that chill creativity. See how to stay motivated in a newsroom environment, and help others to keep striving, too.
Presenter: Lori Waldon, assistant news director, KOVR-TV, Sacramento, CA
12:00 noon Time Management
Why: To keep the day from getting away from you.
Middle managers get on a treadmill Monday morning and get off five days later. They spend their days answering to bosses, directing reporters and producers, answering the phone, reading email or faxes and keeping abreast of the news. They're juggling a dozen balls at a time. Getting time to think is a luxury. Is it any wonder that frontline news managers burn out? You'll learn how to set priorities, when and what to delegate and how to help those around you better manage their time.
Presenter: Chuck Samuels
1:00 p.m. Lunch
2:00 p.m. Encouraging Enterprise
Why: Because you're tired of reporters who can't seem to come up with their own story ideas.
Learn story-finding techniques you can share with reporters and photographers, and consider systems and structures that will help your newsroom break old habits. This workshop also looks at a variety of approaches to beat reporting, and ways that assignment editors can assist reporters without doing all their work for them.
Presenter: Deborah Potter, executive director, NewsLab
3:15 p.m. Break
3:30 p.m. Resolving Conflict/Having Difficult Conversations
Why: Because conflict is inevitable in a newsroom
Learn the key steps to resolving a conflict, whether it is over a story or a vacation request denied. Learn strategies for defusing an emotional situation and preserving the work relationship. Practice holding a difficult conversation so you can get the best possible outcome.
Presenter: Lori Waldon
4:45 p.m. Broadcast NewsTrain Caboose
Taking the lessons home, feedback forms and good-byes.
Presenter: Deborah Potter
5:00 p.m. End of workshop

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