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2007 NewsTrain Program in Memphis

APME NEWSTRAIN/MEMPHIS

Full Program

February 9 - 11, 2007

Friday, Feb. 9:
6:00 p.m. Welcome reception, fun & games
Meet in the hotel lobby, pick up your complimentary ticket, and walk over to the FedExForum to watch the Grizzlies take on the Minnestoa Timberwolves

Saturday, Feb. 10:
8:00 p.m. Continental breakfast
Coffee and rolls available. Newspapers courtesy of Memphis Commercial-Appeal
Location: Memphis Room
8:30 a.m. Introductions and welcome to NewsTrain (All)
Otis Sanford, managing editor, Memphis Commercial-Appeal; Elaine Kramer, APME NewsTrain; Joe Hight, MPI and managing editor, The Oklahoman
Location: Memphis Room
9:00 a.m. Keynote address (All)
"Training Citizen Journalists: Best or Worst of Times for Our Profession?" A speech and Q&A.
Chris Peck, editor, Memphis Commercial-Appeal
Location: Memphis Room
9:45 a.m. Giving Effective Feedback
Why: It's essential to helping staffers grow Learn how to listen well and to get your message across effectively. Gain skill at planning and structuring a conversation, and learn words and phrases that will have the best effect, as well as what not to say or do. Learn how to respond to feedback, and look for clues that the other person is really listening to you.
Presenter: Kristin Gilger, assistant dean, Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications
Location: Memphis Room
10:45 a.m. Break
11:00 a.m. The Five Minute Editor
Why: On some days, it's all the time you have
Most editors promise themselves that they will have weekly brainstorming meetings on story ideas, frequent coaching sessions on writing techniques and daily post-story critiques to identify and reinforce the lessons learned. Those are worthy goals, but for many editors, the daily grind gets in the way. You do, however, talk to your reporters every day, a minute here, a couple minutes there, five minutes when it's really important. You need to learn to use those few minutes to steer the reporter on a path to learn for him- or herself how to improve. Even if you succeed in making time for longer sessions with reporters, much of your most important editing still is done in these brief daily encounters. Presenter: Keith Woods, dean of the faculty, Poynter Institute
Location: Memphis Room
Noon Lunch
Location: Memphis Room
1:00 p.m. Why Training Matters
Why: Because newspapers are a business, too
A discussion of why some news organizations are putting more emphasis on professional development of their staffers. Resources you can use to get valuable training for yourself and push for more training in your newsroom.
Presenter: Elaine Kramer
Location: Memphis Room
1:30 p.m. Handling Race, Ethnicity and Immigration (Blue team)
Why: Your reporters are wrestling with matters of diversity, race and immigration at every turn.
Whether it's figuring out how to include a complete range of voices in the coverage, how to report on a hot racial or ethnic issue or how to navigate the linguistic challenges that are part of reporting in a multicultural world, your staff needs your guidance. We'll look for practical ways of tackling all these complex issues each day in the newsroom.
Presenter: Keith Woods
Location: Memphis Room
1:30 p.m. Dealing with Conflict in the Newsroom (Green team)
Why: Conflict is normal, but dealing with it is essential
Conflict is inevitable in any newsroom, but most of us prefer to avoid it, hoping the problems will just go away. They never do. Learn how to have the "difficult conversation" in a way that is collaborative rather than combative. Learn why people act the way they do in conflict situations, how to manage yourself in such situations, and how to plan and carry out the discussion.
Presenter: Kristin Gilger
Location: Magnolia Room
3:00 p.m. Break
3:15 p.m. Dealing with Conflict in the Newsroom (Blue team)
Why: Conflict is normal, but dealing with it is essential
Conflict is inevitable in any newsroom, but most of us prefer to avoid it, hoping the problems will just go away. They never do. Learn how to have the "difficult conversation" in a way that is collaborative rather than combative. Learn why people act the way they do in conflict situations, how to manage yourself in such situations, and how to plan and carry out the discussion.
Presenter: Kristin Gilger
Location: Magnolia Room
3:15 p.m. Handling Race, Ethnicity and Immigration (Green team)
Why: Your reporters are wrestling with matters of diversity, race and immigration at every turn.
Whether it's figuring out how to include a complete range of voices in the coverage, how to report on a hot racial or ethnic issue or how to navigate the linguistic challenges that are part of reporting in a multicultural world, your staff needs your guidance. We'll look for practical ways of tackling all these complex issues each day in the newsroom.
Presenter: Keith Woods
Location: Memphis Room
4:45 p.m. Choose one:
Option 1 Improving Accuracy
Why: The public is deeply suspicious of why journalists do what they do, how they go about it and whether the outcome is good or bad. Learn key touchstones for building reader trust and practical approaches to improving accuracy.
Presenters: Carol Nunnelley, director of APME special projects, and Margaret Holt, Senior editor for standards and staff development, Chicago Tribune
Location: Magnolia Room

- OR -
Option 2 Helping Reporters Develop a Beat
Why: Beat-work is the heart of sound journalism
Learn how to help reporters set goals, manage their time and define various kinds of stories so it is easier for them to spot opportunities off their beats. Learn to ask questions that help them develop more enterprise off a beat.
Presenter: Dick Weiss, WeissWrite
Location: Memphis Room
6:00 p.m. End of the day

Sunday, Feb. 11:
8:00 a.m. Continental breakfast
Coffee and rolls available. Newspapers courtesy of Memphis Commercial-Appeal
Location: Memphis Room
8:30 a.m. Common Story Forms
Why: Because story organization can be difficult
Nearly every successful newspaper story is a variation on one of a few basic story forms. This workshop teaches the essentials of the "martini glass" and "time blocking" structures for hard news and block organization and narrative storytelling structures for daily stories and projects.
Presenter: Dick Weiss
Location: Memphis Room
10:00 a.m. Break
Location: Second Floor A-V Room
10:15 a.m. Understanding New Media
Why: To help you understand distinct elements of new media and how to use them in different storytelling forms to your best advantage.
We'll talk about ways you'll want to modify reporting for online; what kinds of information to offer for online, and what isn't useful. Editors will be encouraged to set a new hierarchy of time and cost to make better decisions about what to pursue in this broader news world.
Presenter: Randy Covington, director, IFRA NewsPlex, University of South Carolina
Location: Memphis Room
11:15 a.m. Rethinking Your Role
Why: As the newsroom changes along with the internet, the frontline editors' job is being transformed, too.
Storytelling possibilities expand greatly on the Web. Podcasts and blogs present new challenges for the assigning editor. Being resourceful and creative has always been a key part of a frontline editor's job. Now, the mid-level editor must be thinking about all the different platforms that can be served, including how the print version of the next day's story must change as a result of the 24/7 news cycle. This session focuses on how frontline editors need to think to flourish in an expanded role.
Presenter: Randy Covington
Location: Memphis Room
12:15 p.m. NewsTrain Caboose
Seminar wrap-up.
Presenter: Elaine Kramer
Location: Memphis Room
12:30 p.m. End of workshop

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