Print Page | Contact Us | Your Cart | Sign In | Register
2008 NewsTrain Program in Little Rock

APME/NewsTrain in Little Rock

Full Program

Feb. 8 - 10, 2008

Friday, Feb. 8:
Clinton School of Public Service
At William J. Clinton Presidential Center and Park
1200 President Clinton Ave., Little Rock, Ark. 72201
6:00 p.m. Registration
7:00 p.m. Keynote Address (All)
Keith Woods, Dean of Faculty
The Poynter Institute
8:00 p.m. Registration
Hosted by The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

Saturday, Feb. 9:
Clinton School of Public Service
and Clinton Presidential Library and Museum
At William J. Clinton Presidential Center and Park
1200 President Clinton Ave., Little Rock, Ark. 72201
8:00 a.m. Registration, breakfast
8:30 a.m. Introduction to NewsTrain
8:50 a.m. The 5-minute Editor (All)
Keith Woods

Why: On some days, it's all the time you have
Most editors promise themselves that they will have weekly brainstorming meetings on story ideas and frequent coaching sessions on writing techniques. The daily grind gets in the way. You do, however, talk to your reporters every day, a minute here, a couple minutes there, five minutes when it's really important. You need to learn to use those few minutes to steer the reporter to better story ideas, reporting and writing.
9:50 a.m. Break
10:00 a.m. Finding and Telling the Story (All)
Kristin Gilger
Assistant Dean, Walter Cronkite School of
Journalism and Mass Communications, Arizona State University

Why: Focus and form are keys to good storytelling.
Defining the story and choosing the best structure and format mean better reads (or perhaps better video or audio on the Web.) This session explores the options and suggests which approaches work best when. It considers options for deadline today and enterprise next week and next month.
11:15 a.m. Lunch (Blue Team)
11:15 a.m. Coaching Writers (Green Team)
Rosalie Stemer
Independent editing and writing coach

Why: More talk leads to easier edits.
Coach upfront rather than fix stories afterward, on deadline. Reporters and editors can work together through the story process, discussing ideas, focus reporting, organization, structure, prose.
12:30 p.m. Lunch (Green Team)
12:30 p.m. Effective Feedback (Blue Team)
Kristin Gilger

Why: Editors are teachers and leaders.
You want to challenge your staff and lead them to do more and better work. You want them to grow, try new things, pull them off successfully â€" and make you look good. And there are things you want them to stop doing too. This seminar teaches components of effective feedback and explores the power and pitfalls of praise and criticism.
1:45 p.m. Coaching Writers (Blue Team)
Rosalie Stemer
Independent editing and writing coach

Why: More talk leads to easier edits.
Coach upfront rather than fix stories afterward, on deadline. Reporters and editors can work together through the story process, discussing ideas, focus, reporting, organization, structure.
1:45 p.m. Effective Feedback (Green Team)
Kristin Gilger

Why: Editors are teachers and leaders.
You want to challenge your staff and lead them to do more and better work. You want them to grow, try new things, pull them off successfully â€" and make you look good. And there are things you want them to stop doing too. This seminar teaches components of effective feedback and explores the power and pitfalls of praise and criticism.
3:00 p.m. Break
3:15 p.m. Translating Journalism Online (All)
Joe Hight
Director of information and development, The Oklahoman/NewsOK.com

Why: It’s a challenging, changing news world.
News is still about telling stories and engaging and informing the public. But editors are doing that in multiple media, learning new technology, meeting demands for information 24/7 on the Web. This session is about what can happen and should happen as print and television news organizations incorporate the Web as a key platform.
4:15 p.m. Break
4:25 p.m. You choose one.


Understanding Video
Butch Renfroe
Webmaster, KTHV-Little Rock

-- OR --

Ethics and Values in the Digital Age
Panel: Joe Hight
  Carol Nunnelley, APME credibility project
  Frank Fellone, deputy editor, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.

Why: News values and ethical decision-making remain critical, no matter the platform.
As new formats emerge, new issues about ethics and standards develop too. For example: What are newsroom policies on removing offensive postings? How do you correct errors? What role do users play in determining content, standards? Apply your journalism values, ethical know-how to new issues and old ones such as privacy.
5:30 p.m. Tour, Clinton Presidential Library and Museum Reception following

Sunday, Feb. 10:
Holiday Inn Presidential, downtown Little Rock
600 Interstate 30, Little Rock, AR 72202
8:00 a.m. Breakfast, announcements
8:30 a.m. The Tangled Web We Weave; Writing Quickly for an Internet Audience
Kelly P. Kissel
Arkansas News Editor, The Associated Press

Why: Our audience wants news and it wants it now.
An increasing number of news consumers look to the Web for instant gratification of their news appetite. If your newsroom isn’t giving them something filling, they’ll look elsewhere for information. What’s the best way to add quick context to a rapidly developing story? Do readers leave your Web site with more questions than answers?
9:30 a.m. Break
9:40 a.m. Skeptical Editing (Blue Team)
Rosalie Stemer

Why: As stories move through the newsroom, they develop a life of their own.
What stories need are clear-eyed skeptics who question all along the way and zero in on weaknesses. Learn how to edit skeptically and how to challenge the numbers as well as the words. Activate your baloney detector.
9:40 a.m. Difficult Conversations (Green Team)
Kristin Gilger

Why: Is there a problem you are not dealing with? We can help.
Learn how to plan and carry out a difficult conversation. Learn how to conduct yourself; what words and phrases get through to the listener; what to do if things break down. Address how to listen effectively and look for clues that the other person is hearing your message.
11:00 a.m. Break
11:10 a.m. Skeptical Editing (Green Team)
Rosalie Stemer

Why: As stories move through the newsroom, they develop a life of their own.
What stories need are clear-eyed skeptics who question all along the way and zero in on weaknesses. Learn how to edit skeptically and how to challenge the numbers as well as the words. Activate your baloney detector.
11:10 a.m. Difficult Conversations (Blue Team)
Kristin Gilger

Why: Is there a problem you are not dealing with? We can help.
Learn how to plan and carry out a difficult conversation. Learn how to conduct yourself; what words and phrases get through to the listener; what to do if things break down. Address how to listen effectively and look for clues that the other person is hearing your message.
12:30 p.m. NewsTrain Caboose
Taking lessons home, feedback and goodbye
12:45 p.m. End of workshop

Associated Press Media Editors

APME is a professional network, a resource for helping editors and broadcasters improve their news coverage and newsroom operations.

Quick Links

Home About News Events

Connect