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APME Announces Award Winners from 2014
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Dori J. Maynard honored with McGruder Diversity Award

Dori J. Maynard, a nationally respected journalism educator and thought leader on diversity issues, will be honored posthumously as recipient of the 15th annual Robert G. McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership, awarded by the Associated Press Media Editors in partnership with the American Society of News Editors.

Maynard, 56, served as president of the Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education. She died of lung cancer Feb. 24.

"Dori Maynard changed lives in newsrooms and communities across the country," said Alan D. Miller, APME president.

"Thousands of journalists learned to think differently, to be more inclusive, and to make sure that we represent the diversity of our communities in our news coverage and our newsrooms,” he said. "Her words will long ring in our ears, and our readers can be grateful for that. She was the epitome of diversity leadership and left us too soon. We are privileged to honor her and her legacy with the 2015 McGruder Award."

Maynard will be remembered and honored during the annual awards luncheon of the ASNE-APME conference Oct. 16-18 at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California.

The McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership is given annually to individuals, news organizations or teams of journalists who embody the spirit of McGruder, a former executive editor of the Detroit Free Press, managing editor of The Plain Dealer in Cleveland and a graduate of Kent State University. McGruder died of cancer in April 2002. A past president of APME and a former member of the board of directors of ASNE, McGruder was a relentless diversity champion.

Maynard will be remembered for the numerous initiatives she championed through the years. The Maynard institute is named after her father, who was editor and then owner of The Oakland (California) Tribune. He and his daughter both were Nieman fellows.

The institute’s website remember Dori Maynard this way: "Maynard advocated tirelessly for the future of the institute and its programs, reminding all that the work of bringing the diverse voices of America into news and public discourse is more vital than ever. Under her leadership, the Institute has trained some of the top journalists in the country and helped newsrooms tell more inclusive and nuanced stories.”

She received several nominations for the McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership. Wrote Kevin Merida, managing editor of The Washington Post, "To the very end, she was a passionate warrior for diversity in journalism, committed to telling stories that had not been told—or told well—in communities of color across this nation. She had an innovator’s spirit, and an egalitarian desire to work with everyone. She wanted to change minds and hearts. She was fearless, and also someone to fear if you ran a news organization and didn’t believe that all lives matter.”

APME Journalism Excellence Awards 

The Miami Herald, The Wall Street Journal and USA Today were among the news organizations that won top honors in the annual Associated Press Media Editors' Journalism Excellence Awards.

APME also announced that the Seattle Times, Alabama Media Group, the Sarasota (Florida) Herald-Tribune and Vermont Public Radio were winners in a new contest category, the Community Engagement Award, which drew a large number of entries.

"Challenges in our industry clearly have not diminished the quality of investigative, watchdog reporting in the United States," said Alan D. Miller, president of APME and managing editor/news for The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch. "It's inspiring to read through the many entries in this year's contest and see not only great journalism but also the responses to it."

"These stories, whether in print or online, have so affected readers that they have taken action or pressed public officials to take action to right wrongs and fix problems that have affected millions of people," Miller said. "The world is a better place because of the excellent work done by these journalists."

The Miami Herald won the 45th Annual Public Service Award in the large circulation category for "Innocents Lost," its investigation of child deaths because of abuse or neglect after Florida changed its policy and reduced the number of children in state care. The Herald also won the Best of Show award, sponsored by the APME Foundation, which carries a $1,500 prize.

"The death of a child is tragic, but the deaths of more than 500 children in state care is a tragedy of epic proportions _ and criminal," the judges said in honoring the paper. "The depth of reporting allowed for such strong writing that a reader would be compelled to keep reading. And the government would be compelled to act, as it has. ... This is the epitome of public service reporting."

The Detroit News won in the 40,000 to 149,999 circulation category for its investigation of Detroit's high infant mortality rate. "This is tremendous reporting and a compelling story line that carried through the year," the judges said. "It's impossible to stop reading, and it is the best of a very strong class."

The Desert Sun of Palm Springs, California, was recognized in the small circulation category for its investigation that found that more Marines from the Twentynine Palms Marine base have died back home than in the Middle East. "Stunning, powerful wok by The Desert Sun," the judges wrote. "Strong reporting and compelling writing makes this entry stand out in a strong category."

The Wall Street Journal won the Tom Curley First Amendment Sweepstakes Award for "Medicare Unmasked," which forced the federal government to make public Medicare data that had been kept secret for decades.

"The newspaper kicked open locked doors and provided access for all of us _ media and the public _ to scrutinize how the government spends taxpayer dollars on health care," the judges said. "This is high-impact journalism that made a difference for the entire country." The award, named after AP's former president and CEO, carries a $1,000 prize.

USA Today's project "Fugitives Next Door" won the First Amendment Award in the large circulation category for revealing how law enforcement agencies let fugitives go free. The newspaper "put together an outstanding expose of one of law enforcement's dirty little secrets: Hundreds of thousands of fugitives from justice remain free, often to commit more crimes, because police and courts refuse to retrieve them from other jurisdictions," the judges said.

The Columbus Dispatch and the Student Press Law Center won in the 40,000 to 149,999 circulation category for "Campus Insecurity," a series of reports on the denial and injustice that hides the truth about the crime on college campuses from parents and students.

The newspaper and the Law Center "overcame obfuscation, flawed data and public colleges' willful efforts to hide the facts to produce a stunning and revelatory look at the lack of professionalism in law enforcement and the star-chamber quality of `justice' at the nation's taxpayer-funded universities," the judges said.

The San Bernardino (California) Sun was honored in its circulation category for reporting on the Rialto Unified School District, its administrators and school board members _ all of whom showed reluctance to provide public records, and even failed to tell the truth. The judges lauded the work as "dogged pursuit of a dysfunctional public agency entrusted with children's education."

In the new Community Engagement category, the Seattle Times was recognized in the large circulation entries, for its Education Lab, which used guest columns, live chats, public forums and other engagement forms to create a dialogue with the community about fixing public schools. The Alabama Media Group was a joint winner in that category for bringing together a range of voices to address the long history of problems in the state's prison system.

The Sarasota (Florida) Herald-Tribune was cited in the small circulation category for "Newtown 100: A Legacy of Struggle and Triumph," a series on an African-American community and its rich history, voices, successes and struggles.

The broadcast winner in the Community Engagement category was Vermont Public Radio for its efforts to reach out to the public and let them tell how they had been affected by the state's heroin problem.

The Seattle Times' investigation of the Oso, Washington, landslide and The Saginaw (Michigan) News' series on the city's population decline were honored in the Al Neuharth Award for Innovation in Investigative Journalism. The award, sponsored by the Gannett Foundation, provides $2,500 to each winner.

APME also announced that the Boston Herald, the Los Angeles News Group and The Oklahoman were finalists for its Innovator of the Year Award. They will compete at APME's joint conference with the American Society of News Editors from Oct. 16 to Oct. 18 at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. The winner will be judged by conference attendees and receive a $1,000 award sponsored by GateHouse Media's Center for News & Design.

The Oklahoman in Oklahoma City was cited for the Best Mobile Platform. The newspaper's efforts included placing a large video screen with targeted content at the corner of its building overlooking a busy intersection; The Oklahoman Radio app, a hands-free daily newspaper; and NewsOK Now, an app and website that lets readers share location specific news content.

USA Today's project on "Fugitives Next Door" was also honored for Digital Storytelling in the large circulation category.

The Sarasota Herald-Tribune won in the 40,000 to 149,999 circulation category for "Home to Havana," a story about a family's return to Cuba. The Herald-Tribune also won the International Perspectives Award in its circulation category for the Havana story.

The Desert Sun was named in the small circulation category for Digital Storytelling for "How Climate Change Is Altering the Deserts of the Southwest."

The Los Angeles Times won the large circulation category in the International Perspective Awards for its "Product of Mexico," the story of poorly paid and badly treated migrant workers who harvest the produce for America's tables.

Marquette University's student media group in the Diederich College of Communication in Milwaukee was honored with the Innovator of the Year Award for College Students. The group created the Marquette Wire, which delivers news digitally.

Judges did not take part in discussions or vote on categories involving entries from their own news organizations.

APME is an association of editors and content leaders at newspapers, broadcast outlets and digital newsrooms as well as journalism educators and student leaders in the United States and Canada. APME works closely with The Associated Press to foster journalism excellence.

Here are the award winners and honorable mentions:

45th Annual Public Service Awards:

• Winner of Public Service Best of Show and $1,500: The Miami Herald

Over 149,000 circulation:

• Winner: Miami Herald, "Innocents Lost."

• Honorable mentions: Arizona Republic, "Scandal at the VA"; The Wall Street Journal, "Medicare Unmasked"; and The Record of northern New Jersey, "Stuck in a Jam."

40,000 to 149,000 circulation:

• Winner: Detroit News, "Surviving through age 18 in Detroit."

• Honorable mentions: The Post and Courier, Charleston, South Carolina, "Till Death Do Us Part," and The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch and Student Press Law Center, "Campus Insecurity."

Under 40,000 circulation:

• Winner: The Desert Sun, Palm Springs, California, "Marines in Distress."

• Honorable mentions: The Santa Fe New Mexican, "Missteps and secrets" about laboratory officials downplaying waste dangers after a leak, and The San Bernardino (California) Sun, "The Truth Behind Rialto Unified."

Judges: APME President Alan Miller, managing editor of The Columbus Dispatch, chairman; Debra Adams Simmons, vice president of news development, Advance Local; Bob Heisse, editor, The Times Media Co.; and Brian Carovillano, AP managing editor for U.S. news.

___

45th Annual First Amendment Awards and Citations:

• Winner of the Tom Curley Sweepstakes Award and $1,000: The Wall Street Journal, "Medicare Unmasked."

Over 149,000 circulation:

• Winner: USA Today, "Fugitives Next Door."

• Honorable mentions: The Wall Street Journal, "America's Rap Sheet," and the Miami Herald, "Cruel and Unusual."

40,000 to 149,000 circulation:

• Winner: The Columbus Dispatch and the Student Press Law Center, "Campus Insecurity."

• Honorable mentions: Tulsa (Oklahoma) World, "Fatal Flaws" about problems with Oklahoma's executions, and The Blade of Toledo, Ohio, for suing the federal government over the military police's detention of a photographer and a reporter and the deletion of photos from the photographer's camera.

Under 40,000 circulation:

• Winner: The San Bernardino Sun, "The Truth Behind Rialto Unified."

• Honorable mentions: Saginaw (Michigan) News, for challenging in court a small town's refusal to make public the names of 100 reserve police officers whose donations fund the 12-member police department.

Judges: Sonny Albarado, projects editor, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, chairman; Adams Simmons; Miller; Laura Sellers-Earl, editor, the Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon; Bill Church, executive editor, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Florida; Jim Simon, deputy managing editor, The Seattle Times; Joe Hight, former editor, The Gazette, Colorado Springs, Colorado; and Brian Barrett, AP corporate counsel.

___

Fifth Annual Al Neuharth Award for Innovation in Investigative Journalism. Each winner will receive $2,500. The award is sponsored by the Gannett Foundation.

Above 75,000 circulation:

• Winner: Seattle Times, "The Deadly Slope: Examining the Oso, Washington, Disaster."

• Honorable Mentions: Orange County (California) Register, "Illusion of Safety," and the Los Angeles Times, "The Homicide Report."

75,000 circulation and below:

• Winner: The Saginaw News, "I Used to Live Here," a series about the factors contributing to Saginaw's rapid population decline between 1960 and 2010.

Judges: Sellers-Earl, chairwoman; Chris Cobler, editor, Victoria (Texas) Advocate; and Kelly Dyer Fry, editor, The Oklahoman.

___

Community Engagement Award:

75,000 circulation and above:

• Winners: Seattle Times, for its Education Lab, and Alabama Media Group, for problems in the Alabama prison system.

Broadcast,

Vermont Public Radio, for efforts to reach out to the public for stories about how they had been affected by the state's heroin problem.

• Honorable mention: WBNS-TV (Channel 10), Columbus, Ohio, for "Maria's Message," about the death of sports anchor Dom Tiberi's daughter in a car accident. "Maria's Message" is aimed at ending distracted driving and providing tools for parents to help their children become defensive drivers.

Under 75,000 circulation:

• Winner: Sarasota (Florida) Herald-Tribune, for "Newtown 100: A Legacy of Struggle and Triumph," a series on an African-American community and its rich history, voices, successes and struggles.

• Honorable mention: Oakland (California) Tribune, for Oakland Voices, which allows a wide range of community voices to be heard through a storytelling project.

• Honorable mention: MLive Media Group, Ann Arbor, Michigan, for Ballot Bash, which opened up editorial forums for state candidates to the public, with events and webcasts.

Judges: Angie Muhs, executive editor, The State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois, chairwoman, and Ray Rivera, editor, The Santa Fe New Mexican.

___

Finalists for the Eighth Annual Innovator of the Year Award:

• Boston Herald, for its innovative platform called Boston Herald Radio that is fully integrated with its print, online and video divisions and has attracted major audiences.

• Los Angeles News Group, for its new Audience Growth and Engagement Team and its focus on metrics, social, mobile, SEO and all platforms.

• The Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, for its "Downtown Big Screen" and its content management system, new apps and other website innovations.

Judges: Hight, chairman; David Arkin, vice president of content & audience, GateHouse Media; George Rodrigue, editor, The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer; and Allison Gerber, editor, Chattanooga (Tennessee) Free Press.

___

Fourth Annual Innovator of the Year Award for College Students:

• Winner: Marquette University, Milwaukee, student media group in the Diederich College of Communication, Marquette Wire.

Judges: Arkin, chairman; Muhs; and Chris Quinn, vice president of content, Northeast Ohio Media Group.

___

Best Mobile Platform Award:

• Winner: The Oklahoman, for efforts on multiple platforms.

Judges: Autumn Phillips, editor, The Southern Illinoisan, Carbondale, Illinois, chairwoman, and Gary Graham, editor, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Washington.

___

Digital Storytelling Award:

150,000 and above circulation:

• Winner: USA Today, "Fugitives Next Door."

• Honorable Mention: Los Angeles Times, "A Sting in the Desert."

40,000 to 149,999 circulation:

• Winner: Sarasota Herald-Tribune, "Home to Havana."

• Honorable mention: Asbury Park (New Jersey) Press, "The Iron Soldier."

Under 40,000 circulation:

• Winner: The Desert Sun, "How Climate Change Is Altering the Deserts of the Southwest."

Judges: Thomas Koetting, deputy managing editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, chairman, and Jack Lail, director of digital, Knoxville (Tennessee) News Sentinel.

 ___

International Perspective Awards

Over 60,000 circulation:

• Winner: Los Angeles Times, "Product of Mexico."

• Honorable mention: Seattle Times, "Culture Clash: Europe Confronts Amazon's Reach."

Under 60,000 circulation:

• Winner: Sarasota Herald-Tribune, "Home to Havana."

Judges: Graham, chairman; John Daniszewski, AP senior managing editor/international news; and Simon.


AP Staff Awards

Coverage of the grand jury's decision not to indict a Ferguson, Missouri, police officer in the shooting death of Michael Brown won honors for deadline reporting in this year's Associated Press Media Editors awards for journalism excellence by AP staffers.

An investigation of Duke Energy, the nation's largest electricity company, after a coal ash spill in North Carolina was honored in the enterprise category, and a profile of a drug-addicted prisoner who became a hospice nurse won the feature writing award.

Jake Pearson of the New York City bureau won two awards for his investigation of the deaths of prisoners at Rikers Island, a 10-jail complex in New York's East River.

"The AP staff did excellent work producing enterprising, in-depth stories and hundreds of compelling photos in the past year, making it difficult to pick only a few to honor," said APME President Alan D. Miller, managing editor of The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch. "Those receiving APME awards are exceptionally strong and represent some of the best of journalism in America – to the benefit of readers around the world."

Photographs of the protests in Baltimore over the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody and the conflict in Ukraine won the spot news categories, while photos from a refugee camp in Chad and a series on coal miners in Appalachia won the feature categories.

Coverage of the Oso, Washington, mudslide was selected as the Best Use of Video by the judges, and a series of interactives on Ebola garnered Best Use of Multimedia honors.

In selecting the deadline reporting winner, the judges praised the staff work in covering the grand jury decision not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in Brown's shooting. "The AP team's coverage stood out for its accuracy on deadline, for the speed with which it reported fresh news in the aftermath of the decision, and for the evenhanded treatment of an issue where stakeholder emotions ran high."

North Carolina staffers Michael Biesecker and Mitch Weiss, who detailed the cozy relationship between Duke Energy and the administration of Gov. Pat McCrory, were honored for enterprise work by the judges. "The degree of difficulty in getting this important story elevated this entry to the top. The AP staff ... had to dig hard, but the payoff was staggering and the outrage factor high," they said.

Matt Sedensky, correspondent in West Palm Beach, Florida, won the feature writing award for "One Death Too Many," the tale of Jay Westbrook, a troubled man who found his calling as a hospice nurse until death came too close. "The writer takes you on a journey that is inspiring and haunting," the judges said. "Your outlook on life and love will be changed."

Pearson was honored with the Charles Rowe Award for distinguished state reporting for his investigative work on Rikers Island, which detailed three deaths over five years in which inmates were alleged to have been fatally beaten by guards. He also won the John L. Dougherty prize for exemplary work by an AP staff member who is 30 years old or younger.

"His dogged reporting, source building in the corrections system and extensive document and data work yielded both exclusive stories and prompted action from city officials," the judges said.

Baltimore photographer Patrick Semansky won the News Single Photo award for what the judges called his "iconic image" from the Baltimore protests. "The smoke from burning stores, the long row of police in riot gear and the gas mask on a young, black man raising his fist in protest, are images that define a moment and a new age of racial tension in the United States," they said.

Photographer Evgeniy Maloletka, based in Ukraine, was honored with the News Story Photo award for his series on the conflict in Ukraine. The judges said the images "show pretty scenes – a field full of bright yellow sunflowers, a grassy meadow, an apartment with lace curtains – all marred by the jarring, graphic evidence of war. ... These chilling images show the surreal impact of war in modern society and in places we wouldn't expect to see it."

Photographer Jerome Delay, based in South Africa, won the Feature Single Photo award for his image of two young refugee girls from the Central African Republic walking together in a refugee camp in Chad. "Once again, we see innocent children amid conflict," the judges said. "But we also see hope. We see that even amid bleak circumstances, friendship blooms."

David Goldman, a photographer based in Atlanta, won the Feature Story Photo award for his collection of images of coal miners in Harlan County, Kentucky. The photos "showed us the effects on families and community as King Coal loses its influence on this Appalachian region."

Peter Santilli, Youyou Zhou, Peter Hamlin and Heidi Morrow, all based in New York, and Shawn Chen, in Chicago, were awarded the Best Use of Multimedia for their interactives on the Ebola outbreak. The series traced the progress of the disease from Africa to the U.S.; followed the final days of Thomas Eric Duncan, Ebola's first U.S. victim; and examined the work of treatment centers. The judges described the interactive on Duncan's last days as "an especially powerful" presentation.

Videographer Bill Gorman of Washington won the Best Use of Video award for "Scars, Memories Remain after Oso Mudslide," which the judges described as a "powerful, emotion-filled and compelling story. ... Gorman makes expert use of the tools at his disposal."

APME is an association of editors and content leaders at newspapers, broadcast outlets and digital newsrooms as well as journalism educators and student leaders in the United States and Canada. APME works closely with The Associated Press to foster journalism excellence.

Here are the award winners and honorable mentions:

DEADLINE REPORTING:

• Winner: coverage of the grand jury's decision not to indict Ferguson, Missouri, police officer Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown.

• Honorable mention: coverage of Israel's fighting with Hamas in Gaza. "AP's team responded with lightning speed to each new development in the story, adding depth and detail each day in a manner that illuminated an incredibly complicated conflict," the judges said.

Judges: Mark Baldwin, executive editor, Rockford Register Star, chairman; Ray Rivera, editor, The Santa Fe New Mexican; and Cate Barron, vice president of content, PA Media Group.

ENTERPRISE REPORTING:

• Winner: investigation by North Carolina staffers Michael Biesecker and Mitch Weiss of Duke Energy, the nation's largest electricity company, after a coal ash spill in North Carolina. They detailed the cozy relationship between the company and the administration of Gov. Pat McCrory.

• Honorable mention: Alberto Arce, based in Mexico City, for his coverage of the violence in Central America, which the judges described as "remarkable reporting and writing."

Judges: Chris Cobler, editor, Victoria (Texas) Advocate, chairman; Chris Quinn, vice president of content, Northeast Ohio Media Group; and Laura Sellers-Earl, editor, The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon.

JOHN L. DOUGHERTY AWARD FOR EXEMPLARY WORK BY AN AP STAFF MEMBER WHO IS 30 YEARS OLD OR YOUNGER:

• Winner: Jake Pearson, based in New York City, for his investigative work on Rikers Island, which detailed three deaths over five years in which inmates were alleged to have been fatally beaten by guards.

• Honorable mention: Esther Htusan, based in Yangon, Myanmar, for her coverage of the country. The judges said Htusan "displayed extraordinary courage and ingenuity in ferreting out painful stories of persecution and its repercussions, infusing her stories with agonizing details of fleeing Rohingya minorities."

• Honorable mention: Youkyung Lee, technology writer in Seoul, South Korea, was cited by the judges for her "strong reporting instincts (which) led her to a surviving crew member and key information about how the Seoul ferry tragedy transpired."

Judges: Jim Simon, deputy managing editor, The Seattle Times, chairman; Rivera; and Sonny Albarado, projects editor, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.

FEATURE WRITING:

• Winner: Matt Sedensky, correspondent in West Palm Beach, Florida, for "One Death Too Many," the tale of Jay Westbrook, a troubled man who found his calling as a hospice nurse until death came too close.

• Honorable mention: Martha Mendoza, based in San Jose, California, for "Leaving the Jungle," the journey of a homeless woman as she reluctantly moves from one of the poorest areas of Silicon Valley to her own apartment.

Judges: Bill Church, executive editor, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Florida, chairman; Kelly Dyer Fry, editor, The Oklahoman; and Dennis Anderson, executive editor, Peoria (Illinois) Journal Star.


BEST USE OF MULTIMEDIA:

• Winner: Peter Santilli, Youyou Zhou, Shawn Chen, Peter Hamlin and Heidi Morrow were awarded the Best Use of Multimedia for their interactives on the Ebola outbreak.

• Honorable mention: "The Goal of Life," a bilingual feature offering a child's-eye view of the daily brutality for a majority of children growing up in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, and exploring how the discipline of soccer can provide an alternative to criminal gangs. "Emotionally compelling storytelling," the judges said.

Judges: Barron, chairwoman; George Rodrigue, editor, The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer; and Fry.


CHARLES ROWE AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED STATE REPORTING:

• Winner: Jake Pearson, based in New York City, for his investigative work on Rikers Island, which detailed three deaths over five years in which inmates were alleged to have been fatally beaten by guards.

Judges: Anderson, chairman; Cobler; and Thomas Koetting, deputy managing editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.


BEST USE OF VIDEO:

• Winner: Bill Gorman, Washington videographer, for "Scars, memories Remain after Oso Mudslide."

• Honorable Mention: "D-Day: AP Marks 70 Years since Allied Invasion in Normandy." "Great use of video to tell stories of human emotion," the judges said.

Judges: Jack Lail, director of digital, Knoxville (Tennessee) News Sentinel, chairman; and Eric Ludgood, assistant news director, WAGA-TV, Atlanta.


NEWS SINGLE PHOTO:

• Winner: Patrick Semansky, based in Baltimore, for protests in Baltimore over the death of Freddie Gray

• Honorable mention: Single Photo: Khalil Hamra, based in Gaza, for a child treated in Gaza.


NEWS STORY PHOTO:

• Winner: Evgeniy Maloletka, based in Ukraine, for a series on the conflict in Ukraine.


FEATURE SINGLE PHOTO:

• Winner: Jerome Delay, based in South Africa, for two refugee girls from the Central African Republic walking together in a refugee camp in Chad.


FEATURE STORY PHOTO:

• Winner: David Goldman, based in Atlanta, for a collection of images of coal miners in Harlan County, Kentucky.

Photo judges: Miller, Sellers-Earl and Barron.

Associated Press Media Editors

APME is a professional network, a resource for helping editors and broadcasters improve their news coverage and newsroom operations.

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