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2011 APME Journalism Excellence Awards
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2011 APME Journalism Excellence Awards


The 2011 APME Journalism Excellence Awards honor superior journalism and innovation among newspapers and online news sites across the United States and Canada. The awards seek to promote excellence by recognizing work that is well written and incisively reported and that effectively challenges the status quo.

All awards are presented for journalism published or launched between July 1, 2010, and May 16, 2011.

The deadline for entry is Monday, May 16, 2011. *** Deadline extended until midnight EDT Wednesday, May 18, 2011 ***

The awards will be presented at the APME annual conference in Denver, Sept. 14-16 and linked on the APME website.

Nominations are received online only. The first step is signing up as an "entrant" at the APME contest site. Please keep your entrant username and password. You will need it to submit entries and return to the site to edit or add more entries before submitting them for judging. Submit all entries before accessing the payment page to check out.

Entry fees are $75 for APME members and $100 for nonmembers. To see if you are an APME member click here. If your newspaper is not listed, enroll as a member now or renew and receive many valuable benefits of membership, including reduced fees to attend the annual conference and to submit your quality work for consideration for an APME Journalism Excellence Award.

For more information, contact Sally Jacobsen or Summer Moore at Associated Press Managing Editors.

sjacobsen@ap.org

or

smoore@ap.org

212-621‐1838.


Fifth  Annual  Innovator  of  the  Year  Award

 


The award recognizes innovation in print, online, management, structure or other area that demonstrates a bold, creative effort to improve a news or information product and increase audience. Demonstrable success is not essential but could improve the entry’sstanding.
Again this year, $2,000 will be awarded to the winner by sponsors GateHouse Media Inc. and the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute.


 

 

 ELIGIBILITY

The competition is open to any editor or staff member of an AP member newspaper, a team from a member newspaper or a newspaper.

SUBMISSIONS

A total of 20 files can be uploaded with each entry. This can include a combination of documents, published pages and multimedia files, if applicable.

Online innovation: The entrant is responsible for making the site available to judges through a Web link. URL should be submitted with the application.

Print innovation: Submit electronic files of published tear sheets.

Online and print: Combinations are welcome, and should be submitted according to rules for both.

Management, structure or other: Explain thoroughly the innovation and how it Improved or increased efficiency, effectiveness, coordination and audience or enhanced the newspaper’s competitiveness or ability to improve content. Provide examples of resulting content as appropriate.

JUDGING

A panel of APME board members will judge all entries and select three finalists.The finalists will be presented to attendees of the APME annual conference in Denver, Sept. 14-16, and a vote of attendees will determine the winner. A representative of each finalist will be asked to present his or her newspaper’s entry at the conference. Attendance is not required to win.

LAST YEAR’S WINNERS

Top award, as voted by 2010 APME conference attendees:

The Seattle Times for its breaking news coverage of the deaths of four police officers and its networked journalism project.

Finalists:

The Rochester (N.Y.) Democrat and Chronicle for its Picture the Impossible alternate reality game developed in partnership with the Rochester Institute of Technology; and the Statesman Journal of Salem, Ore., for its extensive use of social networking in all types of reporting.


FORMORE INFORMATION
Bob Heisse
APME
Innovation Committee chairm
an
(814) 231‐4640

bheisse@centredai
ly.com



Second Annual Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism

This award recognizes groundbreaking work by a newspaper that creatively uses digital tools in the role of being a community’s watchdog. The winner in each circulation category will be awarded $2,500.

_ Eligibility: The awards are given to Associated Press or Canadian Press member newspapers.

_Criteria: This award recognizes groundbreaking work by a newspaper that creatively uses digital tools in the role of being a community's watchdog. Special consideration is given to journalism that helps a community understand and address important issues. Criteria for evaluating innovation include interactivity, creation of new tools, innovative adaptation of existing tools, and creative use of any digital medium.

_ Nominations: Nominations may be made by a newspaper itself, other newspapers, by AP bureaus or by civic or cultural organizations for work published between July 1, 2010 and May 16, 2011.

_Circulation categories: There shall be two awards: one for newspapers with average daily circulation up 75,000, and the other for newspapers of 75,000 average daily circulation or more, according to the latest audited figures. The winner in each category will receive $2,500 in prize money. APME reserves the right to decline to award a winner in any category.

_ Submissions: Entries should include electronic files of clippings of stories, series and/or editorials and community reaction. No more than 20 electronic files may be submitted, including a detailed letter outlining the background, accomplishments and results of the effort. Entrants are responsible for making the digital tools available to judges through a Web link. URL should be submitted with the application. The letter should discuss significant challenges to the accuracy or the approach of the entry, and steps the newspaper took to address those concerns. The entry must include all published corrections or clarifications.

_ Judging: Judging will be done by a panel of APME board members, including the APME president. Winners will be announced a short time later and recognized at the APME annual conference in Denver, Sept. 14-16.

Last years winners:

The Chicago Tribune and the Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune 

41st  Annual  Public  Service  Awards


The APME Public Service Awards are given to Associated Press or Canadian Press member newspapers for meritorious service to the community, state or nation.

CRITERIA

Entries will be judged on the basis of how the newspaper made full use of its resources in serving the public good and on the high quality of journalism exhibited in the work. Work that demonstrates evidence of positive change that has benefited the public or its institutions will be given strong consideration. The entry may be a single article or a series, and, in addition to the primary print coverage, can include sidebars, graphics, online work, commentary and editorials.

NOMINATIONS

Nominations may be made by a newspaper itself, by other newspapers, by AP bureaus or by civic or cultural organizations for work published between July 1, 2010, and May 16, 2011.

CIRCULATION CATEGORIES

There shall be three awards: one for newspapers with average daily circulation to 39,999; one for newspapers with average daily circulation of 40,000 to 149,999; another for newspapers of 150,000 average daily circulation or more, according to the latest audited figures. APME reserves the right to decline to award a winner in any category.

Only newspapers are eligible to submit entries, except that bureau work may be entered by a single newspaper for judging in the 150,000and‐over circulation category regardless of the size ofthe paper in which the work appears.

SUBMISSIONS

Entries should include electronic files of clippings of stories, series and/or editorials and community reaction. No more than 20 electronic files may be submitted, including a detailed letter outlining the background, accomplishments and results of the effort. The letter should discuss significant challenges to the accuracy or the approach of the entry, and steps the newspaper took to address those concerns.The entry must include all published corrections or clarifications.


JUDGING

Judging will be done by the president and three past presidents of APME plus a senior editor of The Associated Press. Winners will be announced a short time later and recognized at the APME annual conference in Denver, Sept. 14-16.


LAST YEAR'S WINNERS

Over 150,000 circulation

The New York Times for an investigation into the dangers of the increasing use of radiation in diagnosing and treating disease.


40,000 to 150,000 circulation

The Asbury Park Press of Neptune, N.J., won for a comprehensive look at the oppressive property tax system in New Jersey.


Under 40,000 circulation

The Bristol (Va.) Herald Courier won the small-circulation category for an eight-day series and subsequent follow-ups on how Virginia's system of natural gas royalties is mismanaged.

41st  Annual  First Amendment  Award  and  Citations


The 2011 APME First Amendment Awards will be given to journalists or newspapers for work that advances freedom of information, makes good use of FOI principles or statutes, or significantly widens the scope of information available to the public. Other distinguished efforts will be honored with First Amendment citations.


CRITERIA


The objective is to honor journalists and newspapers for significant or breakthrough work that protects or advances the First Amendment or federal and state FOI statutes.A story or project that makes good use of an FOIA law does not necessarily meet the criteria for the APME First Amendment Award, and may be deserving of consideration in the APME Public Service competition. Judges in the First Amendment contest will give preference to entries that break ground in the use of freedom of information principles or overcome significant official resistance to legal application of the First Amendment or FOI laws. Newspapers must choose whether to enter their projects in the First Amendment or Public Service contests.


NOMINATIONS

Nominations will be made by individuals, newspapers, professional societies, schools of journalism, state AP associations and others.


CIRCULATION CATEGORIES

There shall be three awards: one for newspapers with average daily circulation to 39,999; one for newspapers with average daily circulation of 40,000 to149,999; another for newspapers of 150,000 average daily circulation or more, according to the latest audited figures. One Sweepstakes Award will be given to the winning entry that best exemplifies the spirit of the First Amendment. APME reserves the right to decline to award a winner in any category.


ELIGIBILITY

Individual staff members of The Associated Press or Canadian Press member newspapers, or the newspapers themselves, are eligible. Specific articles or actions cited for recognition must have been published or have occurred between July 1, 2010, and May 16, 2011. However, an individual or newspaper may be nominated for contributions to freedom of information over the years.


SUBMISSIONS

The objective is to honor newsmen, newswomen and newspapers for efforts to obtain information to which the public otherwise would not have access. It is important that entries emphasize and document those efforts. Electronic images of pages must include publication dates. A total of 20 files may be uploaded and can be a combination of published pages, documentation and/or multimedia files. A detailed explanation of the entry to be submitted as a document file to your online application should discuss significant challenges to the accuracy or the approach of the entry, and steps the newspaper took to address those concerns.The entry must include all published corrections.


JUDGING

Nominations will be judged by members of the APME Executive Committee, the chairman of the APME First Amendment Committee and distinguished experts on public access issues. Winners will be recognized at the APME annual conference in Denver, Sept. 14-16.


LAST YEAR'S WINNERS

The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch for reporter Randy Ludlow's crusade for openness. His use of public records led to the resignation or removal of two state public safety directors and the director of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services.
The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., for a three-part series revealing that North Carolina has one of the nation's most secretive laws regarding the release of personnel information for public employees.
Merced (Calif.) Sun-Star for exposing, through open records requests, racist e-mails sent by a city councilman to friends.

10th  Annual  Online  Convergence  Awards

The 2011 APME Online Convergence Awards recognize Associated Press or Canadian Press member newspapers and their online partners for the effective interplay between a story in print and the same story online.

CRITERIA

These awards recognize print‐online combinations that exhibit the best applications of both in presenting the story. The article can be on any topic ‐ an in‐depth investigation, a breaking story, a feature story, a profile. Innovative projects in which the print and online components complement and enhance each other will earn the highest marks. Judges will rate the Web package on an effective and imaginative use of the medium.

NOMINATIONS

Nominations may be made by a newspaper itself or its online partner for work published between July 1, 2010, and May 16, 2011.

CIRCULATION CATEGORIES

There shall be three awards: one for newspapers with average daily circulation to 39,999; one for newspapers with average daily circulation of 40,000 to 149,999; another for newspapers of 150,000 average daily circulation or more, according to the latest audited figures. APME reserves the right to decline to award a winner in any category.

SUBMISSIONS

Include electronic files of stories, series and/or editorials and community reaction. No more than 20 electronic files may be submitted, including a letter describing the nominated story and how it was developed between the print and online staffs.The letter should discuss additional elements produced for online and how the online efforts contributed to development of the story in print. The letter also should discuss any action resulting from the coverage. It also should mention significant challenges to the accuracy or approach of the entry, as well as steps the newspaper and/or the online unit took to address those concerns. Published corrections or clarifications must be included.

The letter describing the nominated story should clearly note (1) the newspaper's daily circulation and (2) the number of unique visitors tothe Web site.

JUDGING

Judging will be done by a committee appointed by the president of APME, to include a senior online editor of The Associated Press and other top online journalists. Winners will be recognized at the APME annual conference in Denver, Sept. 14-16.

LAST YEAR'S WINNERS

The Seattle Times for coverage in print and online of the slayings of four police officers in a suburban coffee shop and the ensuing 40-hour manhunt, which the judges said gave the audience a chance to interact with the news in real time.
Florida Today, Melbourne, Fla., for a multimedia package that looked at the life of William Dillon, who spent 27 years behind bars for a crime he did not commit. It combined a special Flash presentation, a 44-minute documentary and stories.
The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, for wall-to-wall coverage of the murder of a popular high school coach who was gunned down in front of students.


10th  Annual  International Perspective  Awards

 

The 2011 APME International Perspective Awards will be given to Associated Press and Canadian Press member newspapers for outstanding coverage of international news for local readers.

 

CRITERIA

These awards recognize newspapers that provide effective and thoughtful coverage of world events for a local audience.This could be reflected in coverage from the newspaper's own foreign staff; consistent, discriminating selection of news agency and syndicate material with an eye to overall importance, the quality of writing and the specific interests of the local community; locally produced stories tracing the international connections of people, businesses and other organizations in the newspaper's circulation area; articles about, or by, local people living or traveling abroad; and the effective use of local experts to provide background on international developments.

NOMINATIONS

Nominations may be made by a newspaper itself, by other newspapers, by AP bureaus or by civic or cultural organizations for work published between July 1, 2010, and May 16, 2011.

CIRCULATION CATEGORIES

There shall be three awards: one for newspapers with average daily circulation to 39,999; one to newspapers with average daily circulation of 40,000 to 149,999; another to newspapers of 150,000 average daily circulation or more, according to the latest audited figures. APME reserves the right to decline to award a winner in any category.

Only newspapers are eligible to submit entries except that bureau work may be entered by a single newspaper for judging in the 150,000and‐over circulation category regardless of the size of the paper in which the work appears.

SUBMISSIONS

An entry can include electronic files of stories, series and/or editorials and community reaction. The files should include proof of publication date. A total of 20 files may be uploaded, and should include a letter with a description of the newspaper’s criteria and philosophy for internationally related coverage.The letter also should discuss any accomplishments resulting from the coverage. It should also discuss significant challenges to the accuracy or approach of the entry, and steps the newspaper took to address those concerns. Published corrections or clarifications must be included.

JUDGING

Judging will be done by a committee appointed by the president of APME and to include an international editor of The Associated Press and other experts on international news. Winners will be announced a short time later and recognized at the APME annual conference in Denver, Sept. 14-16.

LAST YEAR'S WINNERS

The Star-Ledger, Newark, N.J., for columnist Bob Braun's coverage of the earthquake in Haiti, which gave a personal tone to the heartbreaking stories he found.
The Washington Times for Heather Murdock's coverage of Yemen, which, through a variety of stories, gave a sense of the challenges and dangers facing the Mideastern country.
The News Virginian, Waynesboro, Va., for the Borders Within, which told the story of the growing Hispanic population in Waynesboro.

 

Associated Press Media Editors

APME is a professional network, a resource for helping editors and broadcasters improve their news coverage and newsroom operations.

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