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Las Vegas NewsTrain, Oct. 10-11, 2014

The Particulars
Register here.
When: 8 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014
Where: Second floor, Greenspun Hall,  University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Maryland Parkway and University Road
Cost: $75. Includes two days of training, Continental breakfasts and lunches.
Is this workshop for you? This workshop is for reporters, editors and other journalists from print, digital and broadcast newsrooms of all sizes, as well as journalism educators and students.The sessions in watchdog reporting and data journalism presume no previous experience in either. You do not have to be a member of APME to attend.
Diversity scholarships:
A limited number of scholarships to cover the $75 registration fee are available to professional journalists, journalism educators and journalism students of color. Apply by (1) providing the information requested here, and (2) emailing a resume and up to three work samples to Paul Mitchell, recruitment & retention coordinator, Reynolds School of Journalism, University of Nevada, Reno.
Hotel: Tuscany Suites & Casino, 255 East Flamingo Rd., is offering a discounted rate of $69 a night Sunday through Thursday and $110 a night Friday and Saturday, plus 12 percent tax. It includes free Internet in sleeping rooms and no resort fee. To get this rate, call  877-887-2261 and mention News Train (group code: 13Q1J5) or input the group code on this Web page.
What to bring: Your laptop for the hands-on exercises. Also, bring two one-sentence story ideas and an actual story budget or a template for a story budget from your news organization.
Parking: On Friday, park in any empty student or staff spot. Proceed to NewsTrain registration in the second-floor lobby of Greenspun Hall and buy a hanging-tag parking pass for $4.50 for the day. Return to your car and hang it on the rear-view mirror. On Saturday, park free in any student or staff spot. Registration for groups Email Teresa Cooper, NewsTrain program assistant.

SponsorAssociated Press Media Editors (APME)Please see the complete list of donors who support NewsTrain below. 
Hosts: KSNV-TV 3; Las Vegas Review-Journal; Las
Vegas Pro and University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Student chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists; and the Hank Greenspun School of Journalism at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Questions: Email Linda Austin, NewsTrain project director, at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com

Please join us in Las Vegas for a two-day NewsTrain workshop on Friday, Oct. 10, and Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014. Sessions include:

--reporting watchdog stories on a budget,
--conducting data journalism for beginners,
--maximizing your use of social media for reporting, as well as for personal branding and community engagement,
--planning and coaching content across platforms,
--attracting younger viewers and readers,
--managing and surviving change,
--applying the habits of savvy open-records users, and
--unleashing your watchdog with beat mapping

Registration is just $75 and includes two full days of training, plus continental breakfast, lunch and snacks each day.


Register here.

Your instructors include:
  • Linda Austin, NewsTrain project director and a former top editor in three local newsrooms;
  • Michael J. Berens, investigative projects reporter for The Seattle Times and a winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting;
  • Meg Downey, former managing editor of The Tennessean in Nashville;
  • Frank X. Mullen, former investigative reporter at the Reno Gazette-Journal; and
  • Karen Workman, social media staff editor at The New York Times.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Identify and pursue powerful watchdog stories efficiently from everyday records.  
  • Use time-saving techniques to drill through mountains of information -- from paper records to electronic databases -- and extract the critical information that turns routine stories into must-read enterprise.  
  • Improve your comfort on social media, establish your brand, encourage community engagement, and measure how well your social media efforts are working.
  • Use social media platforms and complementary websites to locate expert and "real people" sources, crowdsource using Google forms, and curate social media content to augment your own content.
  • Use the latest research on how young people consume media to attract more 18- to 35-year-old readers and viewers.
  • Apply the latest audience research to the planning and coaching of content across platforms.
  • Use a proven technique -- beat mapping -- to find the time to do more watchdog reporting.
  • Apply an eight-step plan to manage and survive continuous change in the news business.
  • Apply the techniques of savvy open-records users to your coverage.

Download the complete agenda (PDF).

Your Instructors
Linda Austin
is the project director for NewsTrain. Previously, she organized more than 150 workshops, webinars and other training events that served more than 10,500 journalists globally during her five years as executive director of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism at Arizona State University. She is a former managing editor of the Greensboro News & Record in North Carolina; executive editor of The News-Sentinel in Fort Wayne, Indiana; and editor of the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky. @LindaAustin_

Michael J. Berens is an investigative projects reporter for The Seattle Times and a winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting. He previously worked for the Chicago Tribune and The Columbus Dispatch, where he began as a copy boy in 1981. Berens’ work has received dozens of national awards, including multiple honors from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers; the National Press Club; the White House Correspondents Association; and Investigative Reporters and Editors; and Associated Press Media Editors. Additionally, his work in recent years was recognized with a Gerald Loeb Award; Worth Bingham Prize for Investigative Journalism; Selden Ring Award for Investigative Journalism; and Barlett & Steele Award for Investigative Journalism. He is a frequent journalism trainer for various media-related organizations and is a former adjunct professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. @MJBerens1

Meg Downey, a two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist, is a multimedia editor and communications expert based in New York’s Hudson Valley. She has worked in just about every medium from the digital space to newspapers, magazines, television, radio and books, and wishes she could add music to that list. She has served as managing editor of The Tennessean in Nashville, executive editor of the Poughkeepsie Journal and editor-in-chief of Hudson Valley Connoisseur magazine. She has been a contributing writer and editor of 10 books and taught a journalism seminar at Vassar College for nearly a decade. Downey has won more than 40 national awards, as well as three Gannett President’s Rings, naming her one of the top 10 editors in the company, and in 2009 she received a Gannett Most Valuable Player award. Most recently, a project she oversaw on the dangers of texting while driving won the Sigma Delta Chi Award for Non-Deadline Reporting. @MegDowney

Frank X. Mullen
began his career in 1979 as a correspondent at The Denver Post and has worked at newspapers in Colorado, Missouri and Nevada. He spent 25 years at the Reno Gazette-Journal as an editor and investigative reporter. Mullen is the author of non-fiction books, including the “The Donner Party Chronicles,” and is a living history scholar in Chautauqua events nationwide, where he portrays characters including Babe Ruth, Albert Einstein and Henry VIII. In 2002 and 2004, Mullen was named Nevada Outstanding Journalist by the Nevada Press Association. He has also won other national and state awards for investigative reporting, features, public service and beat reporting. He holds a master’s degree in new media from the University of Nevada, Reno, where he has taught writing/reporting since 1998. @FrankXMullen

Karen Workman is a social media staff editor at The New York Times. She previously served as deputy breaking news editor at Digital First Media’s Project Thunderdome and has roots in local journalism. She began her career in 2004 at The Oakland Press in Pontiac, Mich. She worked as both a reporter and community engagement editor before moving to New York City in 2012. She was named to Editor & Publisher's '25 Under 35' in 2013, and has taken an active role in training initiatives throughout her career. @KarenWorkman

Register here.

Session Specifics

Watchdog reporting on a budget Learn how to identify and pursue powerful watchdog stories from everyday records. Pulitzer winner Michael J. Berens of The Seattle Times will share with you his investigative techniques and strategies to distill high-impact enterprise from daily beats and enable you to create authoritative work on multiple platforms. The goal is not to wait for news, but to make it happen efficiently.

Data journalism 101 Once a potential watchdog story is identified, discover time-saving techniques to drill through mountains of information -- from paper records to electronic databases -- and extract the critical information that turns routine stories into must-read enterprise. Instructor Michael J. Berens provides simple methods and innovative reporting tools to mold raw data into hard-hitting stories.


Am I doing social media right? Maximizing your use of social media for personal branding and audience engagement
So, you're a journalist on social media, but you're not sure you're taking the right approach. Instructor Karen Workman, social media staff editor at The New York Times, offers tactics and tips to improve your comfort on social media, establish your brand, encourage community engagement, and measure how well your social media efforts are working.

Using social media as a powerful reporting tool Social media platforms contain powerful reporting tools that can be valuable whether you're facing a big breaking news story or an enterprise project. Instructor Karen Workman explains how to use social media platforms and complementary websites to locate expert and "real people" sources, crowdsource using Google forms, and curate social media content to augment your own content. Bring your laptop or smartphone for the exercise.

Attracting young readers and viewers What does the research say about how 18- to 35-year-olds consume news and information? When, where and on what platforms do they access news? What topics appeal to them, and how do they want that information presented? Instructor Karen Workman tells how to use the research in your newsroom to reach a younger audience.

Planning and coaching content across platforms
The latest audience research offers clear guidance on how audiences access information and how to keep their attention. How does that information translate into best practices for story forms in different platforms? And how can you incorporate that information about audiences and story forms into the planning process for content in your newsroom? Learn from Meg Downey, former managing editor at The Tennessean in Nashville, how she and her staff successfully incorporated multimedia planning into their newsroom.

Managing and surviving change Resources in newsrooms are stagnant or shrinking, yet the demands on editors and their staffs have never been greater. In an industry wracked by disruptive change, how do you continue to do kick-butt journalism? Meg Downey provides a simple eight-step approach, based on John Kotter's research, to managing and surviving change while maintaining enthusiasm and quality.

Unleash your watchdog with beat mapping Watchdog reporting is our highest calling, the journalism that many got into this business to do and a proven way to distinguish your coverage from competitors and drive audience. Yet, making time for watchdog reporting is one of the hardest things to do in newsrooms, where demands continue to increase while resources rarely do. NewsTrain Project Director Linda Austin offers a proven technique -- beat mapping -- to define the topics and issues that mean the most to your audience and to set clear expectations and priorities for watchdog reporting to cover those issues.

Seven habits of highly effective open-records users What do savvy users of the open-records laws know, and how can you apply their techniques to your coverage? 


Our Donors

NewsTrain's 2014 donors include The Ethics & Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Associated Press, The APME FoundationThe McClatchy Co., The Gannett Foundation, Scripps Howard Foundation, GateHouse Media, APME past and present board members and The Seattle Times.

Associated Press Media Editors

APME is a professional network, a resource for helping editors and broadcasters improve their news coverage and newsroom operations.

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