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Orlando NewsTrain, May 15-16, 2015

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The Particulars

When: 8 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. Friday, May 15, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 16, 2015

Where: Rooms 101, 108 and 110, Nicholson School of Communication, University of Central Florida, 12405 Aquarius Agora Dr., Orlando, Florida 32816-1344

Cost: $75. Includes two days of training, Continental breakfasts and lunches.

Is this workshop for you? This workshop is for reporters, editors and other journalists from print, digital and broadcast newsrooms of all sizes, as well as freelancers, journalism educators and journalism students.The sessions in video and data journalism presume no previous experience in either. You do not have to be a member of APME to attend.

Diversity scholarships: A limited number of scholarships to cover the $75 registration fee are available to professional journalists, journalism educators and journalism students from diverse backgrounds. Apply by (1) providing the information requested here, and (2) emailing a resume and up to three work samples to Gil Thelen, executive director of the Florida Society of News Editors. The deadline for applications has passed. Congratulations to our winners!

Hotel: A few rooms at a discounted nightly rate of $104-109 may still be available at the Homewood Suites by Hilton - UCF. To reserve, call Front Office Manager Aleysa Abramova at 407-282-0067 and mention APME's NewsTrain. The hotel at 3028 N. Alafaya Trail is about 1.6 miles from the workshop site. Another nearby hotel is the La Quinta Inn & Suites, 11805 Research Parkway, where rates start at $89 a night. The nearby DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Orlando East-UCF Area, 12125 High Tech Ave., offers rates starting at $109 a night.

Public bus between Homewood Suites and the workshop site:
Please download instructions (PDF), including maps, of how to take the public Lynx bus from a stop near the hotel to the transfer center on campus. The ride on Link 104 takes five to seven minutes and costs $2 each way. It's another 10-minute walk from the Lynx Transfer Center on campus to the Nicholson School, where the workshop will be held. Buses run every 30 minutes; here is the Link 104 bus schedule.

Parking: Download this parking pass (PDF) to park free in Parking Garage I, which is close to the workshop site in UCF's Nicholson School of Communication. Place the pass face up on the driver's side dashboard. This map (PDF) shows the location of the garage and the school.

What to bring: Your laptop and smartphone for the hands-on exercises.

Registration for groups Email
Teresa Cooper, NewsTrain program assistant.

SponsorAssociated Press Media Editors (APME)Please see the complete list of donors who support NewsTrain below. 

Hosts: The Associated Press Orlando bureau, Florida Pro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, Florida Society of News Editors, The (Lakeland) Ledger, the Orlando Sentinel and the University of Central Florida.

Questions: Email Linda Austin, NewsTrain project director, at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com

Please join us in Orlando for a two-day NewsTrain workshop on Friday, May 15, and Saturday, May 16, 2015. You will learn how to:

--produce enterprise stories efficiently,
--conduct data journalism (for beginners),
--maximize your use of social media for reporting, as well as for personal branding and community engagement,
--shoot engaging smartphone video,
--plan for breaking news in the digital age,
--take charge of your career by thinking like an entrepreneur, and
--unleash your watchdog with beat mapping.

Registration is just $75 and includes two full days of training, plus Continental breakfast, lunch and snacks each day.

Register here.

Your instructors include:

  • Linda Austin, NewsTrain project director and a former top editor in three local newsrooms.
  • Michelle Guido, former managing editor at WESH-TV and former breaking news editor at the Orlando Sentinel.
  • Kathy Kieliszewski, visuals director for the Detroit Free Press and four-time National Emmy Award-winning journalist.
  • Ron Nixon, Washington correspondent for The New York Times and a former training director for Investigative Reporters & Editors.
  • Karen Workman, senior staff editor and former social strategy editor at The New York Times who was named to Editor & Publisher's "25 Under 35" list.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Identify and pursue powerful enterprise stories efficiently from everyday records.  
  • Use time-saving techniques to drill through mountains of information -- from paper records to electronic databases -- and extract the critical information that turns routine stories into must-read enterprise.  
  • Improve your comfort on social media, establish your brand, encourage community engagement, and measure how well your social media efforts are working.
  • Use social media platforms and complementary websites to locate expert and "real people" sources, crowdsource using Google forms, and curate social media content to augment your own content.
  • Identify the best video story form to tell your story and shoot higher-quality smartphone video to tell it.
  • Emerge with a checklist for creating a breaking-news coverage plan that incorporates social media, live-blogging, curation, crowdsourcing and public records.
  • Take charge of your career by approaching it as the CEO of the business of you; work on crafting stories and building your brand or reputation so as to attract audiences.
  • Use a proven technique -- beat mapping -- to find the time to do more watchdog reporting.

Download the complete agenda (PDF)

 

Register here.

Your Instructors
Linda Austin
is the project director for NewsTrain. Previously, she organized more than 150 workshops, webinars and other training events that served more than 10,500 journalists globally during her five years as executive director of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism at Arizona State University. She is a former managing editor of the Greensboro News & Record in North Carolina; executive editor of The News-Sentinel in Fort Wayne, Indiana; and editor of the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky. @LindaAustin_


Michelle Guido is a journalist with 25 years of award-winning work across print, digital and television platforms. Most recently, she was managing editor of WESH 2 News, the NBC affiliate in Orlando. Under her leadership, WESH won a 2014 Emmy Award for Breaking News coverage of a deadly crash into an Orlando day-care center. Before that, Guido was the breaking news editor at the Orlando Sentinel, where she planned and oversaw coverage of both the Casey Anthony and George Zimmerman murder cases. As a reporter and editor for the San Jose Mercury News, Guido was a member of the staff that won the 1989 Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Loma Prieto earthquake. @MGuido

Kathy Kieliszewski made her first piece of multimedia with an eight-track player, a cassette tape, a vinyl record and a bunch of still pictures cut out of teen magazines. It was 1986, and she knew then she wanted to tell stories for a living. More than 25 years later, she's still telling stories as the visuals director at the Detroit Free Press and a four-time National Emmy Award-winning journalist. She oversees the video and photographic efforts of a staff of 13 photographers and editors. Kathy's most recent endeavor includes co-founding the Freep Film Festival, a new Free Press documentary film festival, to showcase films about or relevant to Detroit and Michigan. She is the producer of a feature-length documentary, Packard, The Last Shift, about one of Detroit's most notorious abandoned factories.​ @KKieliszewski

  

Ron Nixon is a Washington correspondent for The New York Times who covers the federal regulatory agencies. He is a visiting associate for journalism and media studies at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, and a former adjunct professor at Howard University. A former training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors, he has taught investigative reporting and data journalism to reporters nationwide and abroad. @NixonRon 


Karen Workman is a senior staff editor on the news desk at The New York Times. She was a social strategy editor at The Times. She previously served as deputy breaking news editor at Digital First Media’s Project Thunderdome and has roots in local journalism. She began her career in 2004 at The Oakland Press in Pontiac, Mich. She worked as both a reporter and community engagement editor before moving to New York City in 2012. She was named to Editor & Publisher's "25 Under 35" in 2013, and has taken an active role in training initiatives throughout her career. @KarenWorkman

 

Register here.

Session Specifics

Producing enterprise stories efficiently Learn how to identify and pursue powerful enterprise stories from everyday records. New York Times reporter Ron Nixon shares investigative techniques and strategies to distill high-impact enterprise from daily beats and shows you how to create authoritative work on multiple platforms. The goal is not to wait for news, but to make it happen efficiently. Bring your laptop for the exercise.

Data journalism 101 Once a potential enterprise story is identified, discover time-saving techniques to access and drill through mountains of information -- from paper records to electronic databases -- and extract the critical information that turns routine stories into must-read enterprise. New York Times reporter Ron Nixon provides simple methods and innovative reporting tools to find what data an agency keeps and mold that raw data into hard-hitting stories. Bring your laptop for the exercise.

Am I doing social media right? Maximizing your use of social media for personal branding and audience engagement So, you're a journalist on social media, but you're not sure you're taking the right approach. New York Times social strategy editor Karen Workman offers tactics and tips to improve your comfort on social media, establish your brand, encourage community engagement, and measure how well your social media efforts are working.

Using social media as powerful reporting tools Social media can be used as powerful reporting tools, which are valuable whether you're facing a big breaking news story or an enterprise project. New York Times social strategy editor Karen Workman explains how to use social media platforms and complementary websites to locate expert and "real people" sources, crowdsource using Google forms, and curate social media content to augment your own content. Bring your laptop or smartphone for the exercise.

Efficient video story forms for digital platforms Many newsrooms start out shooting video for digital platforms that look like TV-news segments. But there are other video story forms, including some that are quicker to produce and others that have a longer shelf life. Detroit Free Press Visuals Director Kathy Kieliszewski includes examples of video story forms and advice on when to pursue each, as well as advice on how newsrooms can improve planning and execution of the different video story forms. Bring your smartphone for the exercise. 

Shooting effective video on your smartphone Shooting video effectively and efficiently on your smartphone makes it much easier to quickly edit and post high-quality video. Detroit Free Press Visuals Director Kathy Kieliszewski offers a model for anticipating and capturing the visuals and sound needed for good video. It includes simple standards for framing, lighting and sound, plus advice on essential equipment. Bring your smartphone for the exercise. 

Think like an entrepreneur: take charge of your career Here’s how to not just survive the next round of layoffs but thrive amidst the creative destruction gripping the news business. Think of yourself as an entrepreneur. As the CEO of the business of you, you take charge of crafting stories and building your brand or reputation so as to attract audiences. Whether a newbie or a veteran, what are the skills you need to chart your own career path, and how do you get them? And how do you find and cultivate mentors and others who can help you get there? New York Times social strategy editor Karen Workman gives you a road map to surviving the next layoff or landing on your feet if you are laid off.

Planning for breaking news in the digital age Join instructor Michelle Guido and emerge with a checklist for constructing a breaking-news coverage plan, including how to deploy staff to utilize social media – both as a news platform and a reporting tool, live-blog and curate other news sources, use crowdsourcing and social media to gather information, verify user-generated content, make the best use of smartphone video, and quickly access relevant public records. 

Unleash your watchdog with beat mapping Watchdog reporting is our highest calling, the journalism that many of us got into this business to do and a proven way to distinguish your coverage from competitors and drive audience. Yet, making time for watchdog reporting is one of the hardest things to do in newsrooms, where demands increase while resources rarely do. NewsTrain Project Director Linda Austin offers a proven technique -- beat mapping -- to define the topics and issues that mean the most to your audience and to set clear expectations and priorities for watchdog reporting, including source development, to cover those issues. 

Register here.

Our Donors

NewsTrain's 2015 donors included Advance Local, The Ethics & Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Associated Press, The APME FoundationScripps Howard Foundation, the Gannett Foundation, GateHouse Media, the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation and APME past and present board members.

Associated Press Media Editors

APME is a professional network, a resource for helping editors and broadcasters improve their news coverage and newsroom operations.

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