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Philadelphia NewsTrain, Nov. 13-14, 2015

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The Particulars

When 8 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. Friday, Nov. 13, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015. An optional reception will be held from 4:30-6 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 13, in the Atrium of Temple University's Annenberg Hall, 2020 N.13th St.

Where Temple University in Philadelphia. The Nov. 13 classes will be in Mitten Hall, 1913 N. Broad St. The Nov. 14 classes will be in Annenberg Hall, 2020 N.13th St. The Friday evening reception will be in the Atrium of Annenberg Hall.

Cost $75. Includes two days of training, Continental breakfasts and lunches, plus a reception on Friday evening.

Is this workshop for you? This workshop is for reporters, editors and other journalists from print, digital and broadcast newsrooms of all sizes, as well as freelancers, journalism educators and journalism students.The sessions in video and data journalism presume no previous experience in either. You do not have to be a member of APME to attend.

Diversity scholarships A limited number of competitive scholarships to cover the $75 registration fee are available to professional journalists, journalism educators and journalism students from diverse backgrounds. Apply by (1) providing the information requested here, and (2) emailing a resume and up to three work samples to Arlene Notoro Morgan, assistant dean at Temple University. The deadline to apply is Oct. 13.

Hotel Discounted room rates of $143 a night, plus tax, are available until the room block sells out at the Conwell Inn, 1331 Polett Walk (formerly West Berks Street), Philadelphia, PA 19122. It is a one- to four-minute walk from the inn to the workshop venues. To reserve, call 215-235-6200 and mention NewsTrain. Limited parking is available at the inn for $15 a night and should be reserved at the same time as you book your room. Detailed directions and a map for driving to the hotel are here.

Another hotel is the DoubleTree by Hilton Philadelphia Center City, 237 S. Broad St. To reserve, call 1-800-222-8733 and mention the Temple University corporate rate to receive a rate of $163 a night, plus tax. This rate is not guaranteed and is available only as long as standard rooms are available. The DoubleTree is a short walk to the Walnut-Locust Station on the Broad Street Subway. Take the subway north toward the Fern Rock Transportation Center and get off at the Cecil B. Moore Station on the Temple campus. The workshop will begin at Mitten Hall, 1913 N. Broad St., which is a few blocks north of the Moore Station, 1700 N. Broad St. An interactive Temple campus map is here.

What to bring Your laptop and smartphone for the hands-on exercises.

Parking: On Friday, park in the Liacouras Garage, 1710 N. 15th St., or the 15th Street Lot, 1855 N. 15th St.; both charge $17 per entry. On Saturday, park behind the Berean Presbyterian Church, Broad and Diamond streets; enter the lot from Park Avenue. Pay $10 at the NewsTrain registration desk for a parking pass. If the church lot is full, proceed to the Liacouras Garage or 15th Street Lot. Please indicate on the NewsTrain registration form whether you will need parking.

Public transit At the bottom of this page, please see information on subway, bus and regional rail lines that serve the Temple campus.

Registration for groups Email
Beth Grace, NewsTrain program assistant.

Sponsor Associated Press Media Editors (APME). Please see the complete list of donors who support NewsTrain below.

Hosts Temple University, KYW Radio, The Patriot-News in Harrisburg, The Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News, City Paper, TheNotebook.org and The Associated Press.

Questions Email Linda Austin, NewsTrain project director at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com.

 

The NewsTrain workshop in Philadelphia on Nov. 13-14, 2015, will be a digital-storytelling boot camp: two full days of training that will help you make smart decisions about the best way to tell a story.

This workshop will introduce you to:

  • producing video, recording sound and shooting photos with your smartphone,
  • writing news for mobile,
  • using data to drive enterprise reporting, and
  • maximizing your use of social media for both reporting and branding.

Registration is just $75 and includes two full days of training, plus Continental breakfast, lunch and snacks each day.

Register here.


Your instructors include:

  • Paul Cheung, director of interactive and digital news production for The Associated Press and president of the Asian American Journalists Association.
  • Kathy Kieliszewski, visuals director for the Detroit Free Press and four-time National Emmy Award-winning journalist.
  • Theodore Kim, senior staff editor at The New York Times and former mobile editor at The Washington Post.
  • Ron Nixon, Washington correspondent for The New York Times and a former training director for IRE.
  • Carla Zanoni, executive emerging media editor at The Wall Street Journal.

You Will Learn How To:

  • Make informed choices about the most effective and efficient ways to tell a story digitally.
  • Identify and pursue powerful enterprise stories efficiently from everyday records.
  • Use time-saving techniques to drill through mountains of information -- from paper records to electronic databases -- and extract the critical information that turns routine stories into must-read enterprise.
  • Improve your comfort on social media, establish your brand, encourage community engagement, and measure how well your social media efforts are working.
  • Use social media platforms and complementary websites to locate expert and "real people" sources, crowdsource using Google forms, and curate social media content to augment your own content.
  • Identify the best video story form to tell your story and shoot higher-quality smartphone video to tell it.
  • Apply the principles of good composition and lighting to take powerful news photos with your smartphone.
  • Write content and headlines optimized for the growing mobile audiences for news.

Download the complete agenda (PDF).

Register here.

Your Instructors


Paul Cheung is the director of interactive and digital news production for The Associated Press. He manages a global team of visual journalists, data journalists and researchers who produce multimedia stories and informational graphics for print, online and mobile. Previously, he was The Miami Herald’s deputy multimedia presentation editor and a senior graphics editor at The Wall Street Journal. His term as president of the Asian American Journalists Association began in 2013 and continues to 2016. He has taught as an adjunct instructor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Jhttp://www.conwellinn.com/directions-locationournalism. @pcheung630

 

Kathy Kieliszewski made her first piece of multimedia with an eight-track player, a cassette tape, a vinyl record and a bunch of still pictures cut out of teen magazines. It was 1986, and she knew then she wanted to tell stories for a living. More than 25 years later, she's still telling stories as the visuals director at the Detroit Free Press and a four-time National Emmy Award-winning journalist. She oversees the video and photographic efforts of a staff of 13 photographers and editors. Kathy's most recent endeavor includes co-founding the Freep Film Festival, a new Free Press documentary film festival, to showcase films about or relevant to Detroit and Michigan. She is the producer of a feature-length documentary, Packard, The Last Shift, about one of Detroit's most notorious abandoned factories.​ @KKieliszewski

  

Theodore Kim is a senior staff editor at The New York Times, where he edits and produces the home page and flagship apps. Before that, he was mobile editor at The Washington Post, helping oversee daily production for the mobile and tablet apps. Previously, he worked as a reporter for the Dallas Morning News, USA Today and the Indianapolis Star. He is a former secretary of the Asian American Journalists Association. @TheoTypes


Ron Nixon is a Washington correspondent for The New York Times who covers the federal regulatory agencies. He is a visiting associate for journalism and media studies at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, and a former adjunct professor at Howard University. A former training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors, he has taught investigative reporting and data journalism to reporters nationwide and abroad. @NixonRon
 

Carla Zanoni is the executive emerging media editor at The Wall Street Journal. She develops state-of-the-art news delivery and storytelling, including new social media and texting platforms. She also leads its audience development strategy, including social media, SEO and audience analytics. She works with editors, designers, producers and reporters around the world to increase reader engagement with the publication's digital content. Previously, she led national digital and social strategy for the local news site DNAinfo.com, which serves New York and Chicago. She also worked as a metro reporter for more than a decade in New York City, where she received numerous awards for her reporting. Born in Argentina and raised in New Jersey, Zanoni graduated from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and helped plan its Social Media Weekend continuing-education program. She is at work on her first book. @CarlaZanoni

 

Register here.

Session Specifics

Digital storytelling: making smart choices Join Paul Cheung, director of interactive and digital news production for The Associated Press, to learn the best ways to tell a particular story. What are the strengths of different digital formats: text, photos, video, audio, curation, interactive graphic? What's the time involved to produce them? And what works best on which platform and for which audiences?

Producing data-driven enterprise stories efficiently How do you Swiss-cheese enterprise stories around the many other demands you face as a beat reporter to write dailies, file Web updates, tweet and shoot video? One way is to take advantage of the plethora of local data available online to spot and develop unique stories for your news outlet. All you need is either you or someone else in your newsroom who can download and sort databases in a spreadsheet program, such as Excel. Ron Nixon, Washington correspondent for The New York Times, will help you find and analyze data, enabling you to spot the enterprise stories in the numbers, whether your beat is sports, health, business, local government or cops and courts. Bring your laptop for the exercise.

Data journalism 101 Once a potential enterprise story is identified, discover time-saving techniques to access and drill through mountains of information -- from paper records to electronic databases -- and extract the critical information that turns routine stories into must-read enterprise. Ron Nixon, Washington correspondent for The New York Times, provides simple methods and innovative reporting tools to find what data an agency keeps and mold that raw data into hard-hitting stories. Bring your laptop for the exercise.

Getting your stories read: maximizing your use of social media for personal branding and audience engagement So, you're a journalist on social media, but you're not sure you're taking the right approach. Carla Zanoni, global director of audience development for The Wall Street Journal, offers tactics and tips to improve your comfort on social media, establish your brand, encourage community engagement, and measure how well your social media efforts are working.

Using social media as powerful reporting tools Social media can be used as powerful reporting tools, which are valuable whether you're facing a big breaking news story or an enterprise project. Carla Zanoni, global director of audience development for The Wall Street Journal, explains how to use social media platforms and complementary websites to locate expert and "real people" sources, crowdsource using Google forms, and curate social media content to augment your own content. Bring your laptop or smartphone for the exercise.

Efficient video story forms for digital platforms Many newsrooms start out shooting video for digital platforms that look like TV-news segments. But there are other video story forms, including some that are quicker to produce and others that have a longer shelf life. Detroit Free Press Visuals Director Kathy Kieliszewski includes examples of video story forms and advice on when to pursue each, as well as advice on how newsrooms can improve planning and execution of the different video story forms. Bring your smartphone for the exercise.

Shooting effective video on your smartphone Shooting video effectively and efficiently on your smartphone makes it much easier to quickly edit and post high-quality video. Detroit Free Press Visuals Director Kathy Kieliszewski offers a model for anticipating and capturing the visuals and sound needed for good video. It includes simple standards for framing, lighting and sound, plus advice on essential equipment. Bring your smartphone for the exercise

Taking powerful news photos with your smartphone The best camera you have is the one in your pocket, the saying goes. Join Detroit Free Press Visuals Director Kathy Kieliszewski to learn the capabilities of your smartphone’s camera. Be able to apply the basics of good composition and lighting to portraits and action shots. Bring your smartphone for the exercise.

Writing news for mobile With mobile traffic approaching or surpassing desktop traffic at many news organizations, writing specifically for mobile audiences has become crucial. Writing for mobile is like writing for online on steroids. Theodore Kim, former mobile editor for Washington Post, presents the best practices for writing content for mobile readers, with special emphasis on creating engaging headlines for both readers and search engines.

Register here.

Our Donors

NewsTrain's 2015 donors included Advance Local, The Ethics & Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Associated Press, The APME Foundation, Scripps Howard Foundationthe Gannett Foundation, GateHouse Media, the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation and APME past and present board members.

Associated Press Media Editors

APME is a professional network, a resource for helping editors and broadcasters improve their news coverage and newsroom operations.

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