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WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • March 23, 2017

Dallas Morning News: Bribery trial shines light on lobbying

 

The Dallas Morning News reports that if you’re an outsider looking to win a local government contract and you don’t know any of the players or decision makers you call a lobbyist. It’s a perfectly legitimate way to promote your services and get information to busy public officials. But in the case of Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price, lobbying crossed over into bribery, prosecutors say, when the commissioner accepted money from a Dallas lobbyist to help her clients. Testimony from Price’s bribery and tax evasion trial has provided a rare look into the world of people who are paid to cozy up to politicians for access and influence. It also has revealed weaknesses in regulations governing lobbying at the county level, which made conditions ripe for the type of abuse alleged in the Price trial. Some of those conditions remain.

Read more: http://www.dallasnews.com/news/crime/2017/03/17/john-wiley-price-bribery-trial-shines-light-secret-world-lobbying-county-government

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Reports of drug side effects increase fivefold

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports more than 1 million reports of drug side effects were filed with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2015, a fivefold increase since 2004. According to an analysis by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and MedPage Today, numbers aren’t final for 2016, but are expected to match that all-time high. Drugs used to treat diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, a type of cancer and diabetes are among those with the greatest number of reports. Many of the drugs are for conditions that occur in 1 percent or less of the population, but several have seen increasing use in recent years. For years, the FDA’s adverse events system has been derided because of its largely voluntary nature — only drug companies, not doctors or patients, are required to report problems. As a result, the system likely only was capturing a small percentage of cases.

Read more: http://www.jsonline.com/story/news/investigations/2017/03/17/analysis-reports-drug-side-effects-see-major-increase/99211376/

Austin American-Statesman: Extra pay for Texas judges could take big jump 

The Austin-American Statesman reports two bills being considered by state lawmakers have the potential to boost by 60 percent a controversial salary supplement offered to constitutional county judges — the biggest pay rate jump being proposed for any of the state’s judges. An American-Statesman investigation in 2016 found that some county judges exploited a little-known law that allows them to enhance their salaries by more than $25,000 with virtually no oversight. If both of the pending bills pass, that would rise to $40,000. Despite the title, constitutional judges are the top administrative officers in Texas counties, elected to oversee budgets and preside over county commissioners courts. They are often compared to city mayors. The state constitution also empowers them to perform many courtroom functions, and their work hearing cases can be essential, especially in smaller or isolated counties lacking jurists with law school training.

Read more: http://www.mystatesman.com/news/state--regional-govt--politics/extra-pay-for-texas-county-judges-could-take-big-jump/qflkWh6jD5YgHG22Dnl3YK/

Oregonian: Bogus statistics undercut city program to help Portland renters

The Oregonian reports it all  started with make-believe numbers. The Portland Housing Bureau wanted city money to clean up code violations at low-income apartments east of 82nd Avenue. It sounded like a worthy idea, but bureau officials wildly inflated how many apartment buildings would be eligible. They claimed 400 properties in east Portland had been flagged for urgent repairs, when the actual number at the time was 19, according to an analysis by The Oregonian/OregonLive.

Then, after winning nearly $500,000 from the City Council last year, bureau officials banked the money and let it sit. They haven't repaired a single unit. The amount could have paid for nearly four dozen homeless shelter beds for a year, for example, or helped nearly 100 families avoid eviction.

Read more: http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2017/03/bogus_statistics_undercut_city.html#incart_target2box_default_#incart_target2box_targeted_

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio nursing homes among nation’s lowest rated

The Cleveland Plain Dealer reports how nurses at Normandy Manor of Rocky River accidentally poisoned Susanne Lawrence. They gave her 20 times the prescribed dosage of oxycodone, or 500 milligrams, according to state and federal reports. They failed to read the label on the drug and did not dilute it, investigators said, adding that Lawrence died hours after her last dosage on July 7, 2015. She was 83. Dozens of other residents in Ohio nursing homes have died over the past few years in incidents involving their care, a Plain Dealer review of inspection reports shows. A federal statistical measure, meanwhile, rates Ohio's nursing homes among the nation's lowest in quality of care. "It's a real crisis in Ohio for elderly residents,'' said Brian Lee, a national authority on nursing home care based in Austin, Texas. But some Ohio nursing home administrators and advocates say the rating system is flawed.

Read more: http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/03/ohio_nursing_homes_among_the_nations_lowest_rated_in_quality_of_care_a_critical_choice.html

St. Louis Post Dispatch: Who gets the most police security in St. Louis?

The St. Louis Post Dispatch reports the St. Louis Police Department has two main strategies to better deter and solve crimes plaguing the city and hurting its national image: Add police officers and expand surveillance technology. This was made clear by Chief Sam Dotson in an announcement March 9. inside the police department’s Real Time Crime Center. Soulard, a historic neighborhood filled with bars and restaurants and year-round events that pull in thousands of visitors, was getting 16 state-of-the-art surveillance cameras that will tie directly into the center’s expansive wall of television screens and banks of computers. City police have about 500 cameras overall in the system. But an aerial map of the city displaying the camera networks highlighted a stark disparity between wealthier neighborhoods and poorer ones that are most afflicted by serious crimes and shootings.

Read more: http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/who-gets-the-security-in-st-louis-surveillance-cameras-mostly/article_61f366bb-9d94-531f-bff0-f0c7b34581c8.html

The Minneapolis Star Tribune: Limits on access to day care records proposed

The Minneapolis Tribune reports Minnesota legislators are working to restrict public access to enforcement reports of family day care providers accused of violating standards, a move they hope will slow the dramatic exit of child care operators from the state. Day care operators are pressuring legislators to make the changes, saying their reputations can be tarnished by violation reports that remain available online, even after proving to be erroneous or dismissed on appeal. Measures advancing through the House and Senate would carve a special exemption in Minnesota’s public records law for the nearly 9,000 family child cares, by keeping licensing actions nonpublic until the appeal process is complete.

Read more: http://www.startribune.com/lawmakers-propose-limiting-access-to-day-care-enforcement-records/416522663/

Toledo Blade: Trump budget would halt Amtrak service to Ohio

The Toledo Blade reports Amtrak passenger train service would end in Ohio if the Trump Administration’s proposed budget is approved. Toledo’s Amtrak station and all of its counterparts in the state would lose their trains as part of the proposal unveiled last week, but trains in several Michigan corridors would be preserved.

The President’s budget proposal calls for all long-distance trains to be eliminated so Amtrak can concentrate on improving the efficiency of its shorter corridors. Eliminating the long-distance routes would bring an end to all intercity train service in half the 46 states Amtrak now serves, including three routes that cross parts of Ohio and all service in the Deep South, Great Plains, and Intermountain West. Only routes along the Northeast Corridor and neighboring states from North Carolina to Maine, along the Pacific Coast, and radiating from Chicago would remain. The latter group would include Amtrak’s Chicago-based routes running out to Grand Rapids, Port Huron, and Pontiac, Mich., via Detroit.

Read more: http://www.toledoblade.com/local/2017/03/19/Trump-budget-would-halt-Amtrak-service-in-Ohio.html

Maine Sunday Telegram: Health care: Elderly, rural Mainers have most to lose

The Maine Sunday Telegram reports more than 25,000 older Mainers who have Affordable Care Act insurance could pay up to seven times as much for health insurance under the proposed Republican health care bill under consideration in the House. Mainers in their 50s and early 60s living in the state’s poorest, most rural counties would be hardest-hit by the Republican bill to replace Obamacare, according to a Maine Sunday Telegram analysis of data from the Congressional Budget Office and the Kaiser Family Foundation, with premiums that could soar from a couple of hundred dollars monthly to more than $1,300 each month. Of the 79,400 Mainers who currently receive insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act, almost one-third, or 25,391, are between the ages of 55 and 64, the group that experts say would be hit disproportionately hard by the replacement bill.

Read more: http://www.pressherald.com/2017/03/19/mainers-would-pay-up-to-seven-times-more-in-premiums-under-house-republican-aca-replacement-bill/

Chicago Tribune: Chicago minority areas see the most bike tickets

The Chicago Tribune reports that as Chicago police ramp up their ticketing of bicyclists, more than twice as many citations are being written in African-American communities than in white or Latino areas. A Tribune review of police statistics has found the top 10 community areas for bike tickets from 2008 to Sept. 22, 2016, include seven that are majority African-American and three that are majority Latino. Police say the citations are in the interests of public safety. African-American bike advocates say the higher number of tickets in some South and West side areas could be caused in part by the lack of bike infrastructure like protected bike lanes, leading cyclists to take to the sidewalk to avoid traffic on busy streets. But some bike advocates and an elected official expressed concern that police may be unfairly targeting cyclists in black communities while going easier on law-breaking cyclists in white areas. Blacks, Latinos and whites each make up about a third of the city's residents, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-chicago-bike-tickets-minorities-0319-20170317-story.html

Arizona Republic: Hundreds sentenced to life with parole. It doesn't exist

The Arizona Republic reports that murder is ugly, and murderers are not sympathetic characters. But justice is justice, and a deal is a deal. We expect the men and women who administer the criminal justice system — prosecutors, defense attorneys, and especially judges — to know the law and to apply it fairly. Yet, for more than 20 years they have been cutting plea deals and meting out a sentence that was abolished in 1993: Life with a chance of parole after 25 or 35 years. Some of those deals are about to come due. Between January 1994 and January 2016, a study by The Republic found, half of Arizona murder defendants sentenced to less than natural life sentences — at least 248 current prisoners in the Arizona Department of Corrections — were given sentences of life in prison with a chance of parole after 25 or 35 years.

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2017/03/19/myth-life-sentence-with-parole-arizona-clemency/99316310/

Des Moines Register: Iowan fights Medicaid firm trying to cut in-home help

The Des Moines Register reports a private Medicaid company was trying to reduce the amount of time aides are paid to help Jamie Campbell who needs extensive assistance because he is paralyzed from the neck down. Medicaid pays about $10.50 per hour for aides to help him live in his house instead of in a nursing home. Their duties include cooking for him, dressing him, cleaning his house, running errands, giving him his medicine and emptying his urine bag. A national Medicaid management company, UnitedHealthcare, is trying to trim those services, Campbell told an official from the state’s Long-Term Care Ombudsman’s office.  Campbell, 44, knows others are also facing such cuts from the three private companies Iowa hired last year to manage the state’s $4 billion Medicaid system. He’s one of nearly 7,400 Iowans with disabilities who use Medicaid’s Consumer Directed Attendant Care program.

Read more: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/health/2017/03/16/disabled-iowans-say-medicaid-firms-cutting--home-help/99143798/

Orlando Sentinel: Fingerprint examiner’s alleged mistakes go back years

The Orlando Sentinel reports that when the Orange-Osceola State Attorney’s Office sent a letter to defense attorneys in February warning them that their clients’ cases may have been affected by Orange County Sheriff’s Office employee Marco Palacio’s alleged mistakes, it described the errors as “performance issues … clerical errors, failure to identify prints of value and the mislabeling of print cards.” The personnel file of the latent print examiner reveals that errors had been made for years before prosecutors were made aware — potentially affecting more than 2,500 cases. In his role, Palacio acted as an expert examiner of crime scene fingerprints and handprints to determine whether they matched those of suspects. The Orange-Osceola Public Defender’s Office is reviewing more than 1,675 criminal cases in which Palacio was involved to ensure no clients were harmed by his errors. The remaining cases may be reviewed by private practice attorneys.

Read more: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/breaking-news/os-marco-palacio-personnel-file-20170310-story.html

Los Angeles Times: Immigration crack down worsening farm labor shortage

The Los Angeles Times reports a growing number of agricultural businessmen say they face an urgent shortage of workers. The flow of labor began drying up when President Barack Obama tightened the border. Now President Donald Trump is promising to deport more people, raid more companies and build a wall on the southern border. That has made California farms a proving ground for the Trump team’s theory that by cutting off the flow of immigrants they will free up more jobs for American-born workers and push up their wages. So far, the results aren’t encouraging for farmers or domestic workers. Farmers are being forced to make difficult choices about whether to abandon some of the state’s hallmark fruits and vegetables, move operations abroad, import workers under a special visa or replace them altogether with machines.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-fi-farms-immigration/

San Diego Union Tribune: Why health care is so expensive with no fix likely

The San Diego Union Tribune reports practically everyone knows health care in the United States is the most expensive in the world, but few really understand why. At the moment, the GOP-led push in Congress and the White House to overhaul Obamacare is focusing on premiums and deductibles, coverage rates and co-pays. Yet they are just the mechanisms of paying for a system that continues to consume a larger percentage of the nation’s gross domestic product than in any other highly industrialized country. For example, a study from the Commonwealth Fund, a nonpartisan health-care think tank, said the United States spent $9,086 per person in 2013 on medical expenses — $2,761 more than Switzerland, the next-highest spender on the list of 13 wealthy nations. The Commonwealth study found that among industrialized nations, there were significant pricing differences for many medical procedures. An MRI scan in the U.S. cost $1,145 on average in 2013, compared with $138 in Switzerland, $350 in Australia and $461 in the Netherlands. An appendectomy cost $6,645 in New Zealand and $13,910 in America.

Read more: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/health/sd-me-healthcare-costs-20170318-story.html

New York Times: Door-busting drug raids leave a trail of blood

The New York Times reports that as policing has militarized to fight a faltering war on drugs, few tactics have proved as dangerous as the use of forcible-entry raids to serve narcotics search warrants, which regularly introduce staggering levels of violence into missions that might be accomplished through patient stakeouts or simple knocks at the door. Thousands of times a year, these “dynamic entry” raids exploit the element of surprise to effect seizures and arrests of neighborhood drug dealers. But they have also led time and again to avoidable deaths, gruesome injuries, demolished property, enduring trauma, blackened reputations and multimillion-dollar legal settlements at taxpayer expense, an investigation by The New York Times found. A Times’s investigation, which relied on dozens of open-record requests and thousands of pages from police and court files, found that at least 81 civilians and 13 law enforcement officers died in such raids from 2010 through 2016. Scores of others were maimed or wounded.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/03/18/us/forced-entry-warrant-drug-raid.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK  • March 9, 2017

AP: Solitary confinement suits cost New Mexico counties millions

The Associated Press reported that George Abila won a nearly $2 million lawsuit against New Mexico's Eddy County over his treatment while held in solitary confinement. Former jail inmates have now won more than $20 million in judgments in recent years against New Mexico counties over their treatment in solitary. With more cases pending, state lawmakers are debating a proposal that would ban solitary confinement for juveniles, pregnant women and inmates with mental illness. Abila’s case, filed in 2014 after Abila's release, marked at least the fifth in as many years in New Mexico to result in a major payout for a former jail inmate held in solitary, a practice that has come under broad scrutiny nationwide amid growing evidence that the mentally ill are routinely housed in segregation. This report was made in collaboration with the CJ Project, an initiative to broaden the news coverage of criminal justice issues affecting New Mexico's communities of color.

Read more: http://www.star-telegram.com/news/politics-government/national-politics/article136750168.html#storylink=cpy

Rockford Register Star: Black students overrepresented in disciplinary actions

The Rockford Register Star reports that across the country, in Illinois and throughout the Rock River Valley, students of color are disciplined at a much higher rate than white students, in some cases by a ratio as high as 4-to-1. A Rockford Register Star analysis of suspension and expulsion data from Rockford Public Schools, the region's largest and most diverse school system, revealed a pronounced racial disparity. The Register Star submitted a Freedom of Information Act request late last year for an accounting of all in-school and out-of-school suspensions and expulsions by race for the past five years. The document contained nearly 148,000 individual disciplinary actions. Black students accounted for the majority of all discipline all five years. To Margaret Stapleton, community justice director for the Chicago-based Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law, the data is "a canary in a coal mine.

Read more: http://www.rrstar.com/news/20170217/race-in-rock-river-valley-black-students-overrepresented-in-school-disciplinary-actions

Modesto Bee: County’s pension reforms could hinder recruiting new CEO

The Modesto Bee reports Stanislaus County was a leader in reducing public employee pensions that have been a major contributor to government budget deficits in California. Faced with rising costs of funding pension benefits for employees seven years ago, the county negotiated agreements with labor groups that created less-lucrative benefits for new employees hired on or after Jan. 1, 2011. But those reforms now hamstring the county when the Sheriff’s Department tries to hire peace officers from other agencies. It makes it more difficult to hire qualified professionals to manage county departments or hire the next chief executive officer for Stanislaus County, officials said.

Read more: http://www.modbee.com/news/article136507928.html

Arizona Republic: Arizona’s food waste could feed millions

The Arizona Republic reports that experts put the amount of food that's thrown away in America as staggering but "invisible." Borderlands Food Bank is one Arizona organization that's helping bring the problem into focus. POWWOW stands for Produce on Wheels without Waste. It’s one of several programs run by Borderlands Food Bank, a Nogales, Ariz.-based non-profit that rescues food before it goes to the landfill. Borderlands is one of a growing number of groups working to fight food waste in America, where more than 25 million people are unsure where their next meal will come from. At its core, food waste is an economic, social and environmental issue. The amount of food that's thrown away in America is staggering.

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/entertainment/dining/2017/03/03/food-waste-borderlands-food-bank-arizona/97919856/

Maine Sunday Telegram: Portland program offers panhandlers jobs

The Maine Sunday Telegram reports officials in Portland, Maine, are working on a 36-week pilot program to offer day jobs to panhandlers. A city social worker would drive a van around to busy intersections and offer panhandlers a chance to earn $10.68 an hour cleaning up parks and other light labor jobs. They would be paid at the end of each day. Panhandling has been a growing concern in U.S. cities such as Portland, where business owners worry the practice puts a damper on tourism and some residents and visitors complain about panhandlers asking for money on sidewalks and at stoplights. In recent years, panhandlers have spread into smaller communities and staked out street corners in places such as Biddeford, Scarborough, South Portland, Wells, Augusta and Bangor.

Read more: http://www.pressherald.com/2017/03/05/to-panhandlers-program-may-offer-welcome-change-jobs/

Democrat and Chronicle: Opt-out movement remains strong across New York

The Democrat and Chronicle reports the statewide movement by some parents to boycott New York’s standardized tests has been around so long that it is nearing school age itself. More than 1 million students across the state will be eligible to sit for the state’s English language arts and math exams, which will begin later this month and resume in May. If the past two years are any guide, about one in five will refuse. For the fourth consecutive year, tens of thousands of parents across the state appear poised to refuse New York’s standardized exams, which are administered to students in grades 3-8. The so-called opt-out movement has grown from its nascent stages in 2014 — when about 5 percent of eligible students didn’t take the tests — to the past two years, when about 20 percent didn't take them.

Read more: http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/politics/albany/2017/03/02/opt-out-movement-new-york/98608956/

Denver Post: Rules relaxed for sex offender in Colorado. Now what?

The Denver Post reports Colorado’s sex offenders have long maintained the state treats them as pariahs, closely monitoring where they live, what they look at, whom they talk to and what they discuss. One claimed in federal court filings that he was warned against keeping a crucifix because it displayed partial nudity. Another, convicted of groping a woman, said he had to write down his thoughts every time he saw a school bus. The idea was to protect children, but the resulting system that cut off offenders from their own families has now been struck down in federal court. That leaves Colorado to create a new sex-offender treatment and management system that defense lawyers say is long overdue but prosecutors worry will put children at risk. Supporters of the changes point to lives disrupted by what they call an outdated and overreaching system.

Read more: http://www.denverpost.com/2017/03/05/sex-offenders-colorado-rules-children/

Houston Chronicle: Energy industry an alluring target for cyberattacks

The Houston Chronicle reports how the Coast Guard conducts sweeps along the waters of the Sabine-Neches waterway for unprotected wireless signals that hackers could use to gain access to oil, gas and petrochemical facilities. Four massive refineries sit along the 79-mile channel that cuts through this stretch of Gulf Coast. It's one of the largest concentration of refineries, pipelines, chemical plants and natural gas terminals in the United States - and an alluring target for espionage, disruption or worse. As national attention focuses on Russian cyberattacks aimed at influencing the last presidential election, oil and gas companies face increasingly sophisticated hackers seeking to steal trade secrets and manipulate industrial sensors and operations.

Read more: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/As-cyberattacks-become-more-sophisticated-energy-10973429.php

Des Moines Register: Company has 28 pipelines spills in Iowa since 2000

The Des Moines Register reports the company whose pipeline dumped more than 46,000 gallons of diesel on northern Iowa farmland in January has had more spills than any other pipeline operator in the state over the past 16 years, according to a Des Moines Register analysis. Magellan Midstream Partners pipelines leaked 27 times in Iowa between 2000 and 2016, spewing tens of thousands of gallons of hazardous products, according to Iowa Department of Natural Resources data. Magellan's spills are nearly double the 14 of Enterprise Products Offering, the second most frequent offender. Magellan reported its 28th spill Jan. 25 near Hanlontown, Ia., where a rupture dumped thousands of gallons of diesel onto snow-covered crop fields. The spill immediately stoked foes of the Dakota Access pipeline, whose builders plan to start pumping oil through the 1,172-mile line within weeks.

Read more: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/money/business/2017/03/04/exclusive-company-has-28-pipeline-spills-iowa-since-2000/97402034/

San Francisco Chronicle: Firm keeps sucking sand from Monterey Bay

The San Francisco Chronicle reports critics are concerned that an anachronistic industry on a remote beach in Monterey Bay is eating away California’s quintessential seacoast. There, surrounded by dune grass, is a dredging boat with rusting anchors and a hydraulic pipeline that stretches toward an inland factory building, where plumes of steam rise from a chimney. The rig sucks up a slurry of sand and seawater that comes in with the tide and pipes it to the plant, where the granules are washed, graded, dried and taken out on trucks destined for golf course bunkers and less romantic consumer products like filtration systems, stucco and grout. The Lapis Sand Plant, in operation since 1906, is the nation’s last coastal sand mine. It is believed to extract roughly 270,000 cubic yards of sand per year from a dredging pond on the beach, according to geologists and oceanographers who have studied the impacts. That’s the equivalent of a large dump truck load every half hour, 24 hours a day.

Read more: http://www.sfchronicle.com/science/article/Ignoring-state-threats-firm-keeps-sucking-sand-10973856.php

Chicago Tribune: ATF sting operation accused of racial bias

The Chicago Tribune reports dozens of people are at the center of a brewing legal battle in Chicago's federal court over whether the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' signature sting operation used racial bias in finding its many targets.  A team of lawyers led by the University of Chicago Law School is seeking to dismiss charges against more than 40 defendants in Chicago. The undercover probes, a staple of the ATF since the mid-1990s, have ensnared hundreds of defendants across the country. A recently unsealed study by a nationally renowned expert concluded that ATF showed a clear pattern of racial bias in picking its targets for the drug stings. The disparity between minority and white defendants was so large that there was "a zero percent likelihood" it happened by chance, the study found.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-atf-stash-house-sting-racial-discrimination-met-20170303-story.html

Seattle Times: Drinking water wells polluted by fire fighting chemicals

The Seattle Time reports a potentially hazardous chemical, found in firefighting foam, has been discovered in a few wells on Whidbey Island. While the Navy distributes bottled water and plans for expanded testing, homeowners worry about long lasting harm. So far, the Navy has tested more than 170 island wells and found foam contaminants in eight wells at levels above the EPA guideline. Residents who got the bad news have expressed worry, and sometimes anger, as they learn their well water is suddenly off-limits. And as they think about all the water they’ve been drinking for years, homeowners now are researching the health risks — including some types of cancer — linked to perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances — or PFAS. The continuing effort to determine the scope of the well pollution has added a new layer of tension to the Navy’s relations with its Whidbey Island neighbors just as base officials prepare for a major expansion.

Read more; http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/environment/whidbey-island-wells-polluted-with-firefighting-chemicals-near-navy-airstrips/

Los Angeles Times: L.A. keeps building near freeways despite sickness

The Los Angels Times reports that for more than a decade California air quality officials have warned against building homes within 500 feet of freeways. And with good reason: People there suffer higher rates of asthma, heart attacks, strokes, lung cancer and pre-term births. Recent research has added more health risks to the list, including childhood obesity, autism and dementia. Yet Southern California civic officials have flouted those warnings, allowing a surge in home building near traffic pollution, according to a Los Angeles Times analysis of U.S. Census data, building permits and other government records. In Los Angeles alone officials have approved thousands of new homes within 1,000 feet of a freeway — even as they advised developers that this distance poses health concerns.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-me-freeway-pollution/

Orlando Sentinel: Nursing home inspection reports leave gaps

The Orlando Sentinel reports that if you want to check on conditions at a Florida nursing home where your elderly loved one is living, you might be surprised at what you don’t find in state inspection reports that are legally required to be open to the public, such as dates. Or places. Or pivotal words. The leader of a national watchdog group, Brian Lee of Families For Better Care, calls the heavily censored reports — which cover inspections of nursing homes and assisted living facilities — “shocking.” He first noticed a difference in the amount of information withheld late last year. I’ve been looking at these reports for 20 years, and I know what they used to look like and what they look like now,” said Nathan Carter, an Orlando personal injury attorney whose clients have included nursing home residents and their families. “It has become arbitrary and inconsistent what they redact — but I think it’s all part of a bigger purpose to confuse people and make the reports useless.”

Read more: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/health/os-florida-nursing-homes-inspection-reports-20170228-story.html

Arizona Daily Star: 200 Tucson cops and firefighters paid over $100,000

The Arizona Daily Star reports that Mre than 200 Tucson police and fire employees were paid over $100,000 in 2016, a good portion of which came from sources of pay other than their base salaries, such as overtime and special-duty, city records show.

The Tucson Police Department paid its employees more than $84 million last year, of which $60 million was base salaries. The Fire Department paid out nearly $53 million, and $38 million of that was base pay. Out of 1,317 Tucson Police Department employees, 148 were paid above $100,000, but only 19 made more than that amount in base pay. The other 129 crossed the threshold with other pay categories and cash benefits, of which there are dozens of different types, including overtime, military pay, vehicle allowance and sick-leave buyback.

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/local/watchdog/tucson-cops-firefighters-were-paid-more-than-in/article_979ed945-1cb2-52a7-91ef-9740e475d001.html

Sacramento Bee: California exports its poor to Texas, other states

The Sacramento Bee reports that every year from 2000 through 2015 more people left California than moved in from other states. This migration was not spread evenly across all income groups, a Sacramento Bee review of U.S. Census Bureau data found. The people leaving tend to be relatively poor, and many lack college degrees. Move higher up the income spectrum, and slightly more people are coming than going. About 2.5 million people living close to the official poverty line left California for other states from 2005 through 2015, while 1.7 million people at that income level moved in from other states – for a net loss of 800,000. During the same period, the state experienced a net gain of about 20,000 residents earning at least five times the poverty rate – or $100,000 for a family of three.

Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/news/state/california/article136478098.html#storylink=cpy

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • March 2, 2017

AP: Ex-congregants of religious sect reveal years of ungodly abuse

The Associated Press reported 43 former congregants of the Word of Faith Fellowship in the tiny town of Spindale, North Carolina, told the new organization in separate, exclusive interviews that they were regularly punched, smacked, choked, slammed to the floor or thrown through walls in a violent form of deliverance meant to "purify" sinners by beating out devils. Lured by promises of inner peace and eternal life, they flocked  to the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains and found what many said was years of terror waged in the name of the Lord. Victims of the violence were said to include preteens and toddlers — even crying babies, who were vigorously shaken, screamed at and sometimes smacked to banish demons. "I saw so many people beaten over the years. Little kids punched in the face, called Satanists," said Katherine Fetachu, 27, who spent nearly 17 years in the church.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow/la-na-word-of-faith-fellowship-abuse-20170226-story.html

AP: Utah lobbyists treat lawmakers with no scrutiny

The Associated Press reported how half a dozen Utah lawmakers joined a group of lobbyists for dinner in a private dining room in Salt Lake City  with the group’s nearly $1,000 bill paid for by their health care-industry clients. Legislators who attended all sit on committees that oversee health issues, but they say no one tried to influence them and it was a routine social event. For members of the public, however, it’s hard to determine exactly how routine it is - the dinner falls into a gap in Utah lobbying laws and isn’t required to be divulged on lobbyist or lawmaker disclosure reports. Utah’s lobbyist reporting laws create an exemption for events that are open to all members of any committee, official task force or party caucus. The Feb. 15 dinner, paid for by health care groups, was open to all members of three health-related committees. John Wonderlich, the executive director of Sunlight Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based open government group, said lobbyist reporting exemptions in other states generally require an event to be widely attended or open to the public, “not a dinner for people specifically that have power over your interests.”

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/feb/17/apnewsbreak-utah-lobbyists-treat-lawmakers-with-no/

Santa Fe New Mexican: Efforts by lawmakers to rein in small loans just die

The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that in a Roundhouse meeting room packed with lobbyists and a few consumer protection advocates, the House Business and Industry Committee on Friday, Feb. 24, quietly tabled a bill that would have capped the annual percentage rates for payday loans and other small loans at 36 percent. The 11-member panel didn’t vote on the matter. The committee’s chairwoman, Debbie Rodella, D-Española, simply asked her members if anyone objected. No one did. It was an unceremonious end to a proposal that consumer protection advocates have pushed for years, trying to rein in an industry they say preys on the poor with annual percentage rates that can climb as high as 9,000 percent. And no one, not even the bill’s sponsor, who was not present, seemed surprised. And they shouldn’t have been. Since 2010, at least 11 bills that would have capped interest rates on storefront lenders have died without making it out of their initial committees.

Read more: http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/business/efforts-to-rein-in-small-loans-meet-resistance-from-lawmakers/article_7a6dc5bc-c9c8-521e-a49d-ef02a8fbc3b8.html

Chicago Tribune: Police say some gangs turning to rifles for added firepower

The Chicago Tribune reports the first time 14-year-old Brisa Ramirez remembers hearing rifle fire was when a man was shot dead on a Sunday afternoon outside a Catholic church around the corner from her home in Back of the Yards. The shooting was one of at least 33 in Back of the Yards and Brighton Park over the past nine months that police believe are tied to semi-automatic rifles as several gangs boost their firepower. At least 46 people have been shot in the attacks, 13 fatally. Police say this is the only area of the city where rifles styled after AR-15s and AK-47s are regularly used, a menacing new development in the gang fights. It's unclear how many of the high-powered rifles are on the street, but police suspect they are being passed around by members of four Hispanic gangs in the Deering police district, which covers parts of the South and Southwest sides.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-gang-rifles-chicago-violence-met-20170223-story.html

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Widow taken for millions sparks debate

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that by the time help arrived, those who Frances Perkins entrusted with her health and financial security had inflicted significant harm on the Marietta widow. The episode is among the largest cases of financial exploitation of a senior in Georgia history and shows how Georgia’s law governing power of attorney leaves the elderly vulnerable to abuse. She lived in squalor with dead rats in her home and suffered from dementia. Over a lifetime, Perkins amassed wealth from family real estate investments and, after her husband died in 1992, she lived frugally spending little from her nest egg of millions. That life changed in September 2011 when, just days shy of her 90th birthday and in early stages of dementia, Perkins signed over financial power of attorney to a man who just a couple years before had been a total stranger. Over a period of two years, Jeff Carr took control of Perkins’ life and stole $3.6 million from her.

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/crime--law/cobb-widow-taken-for-millions-sparks-debate-over-elder-abuse/sv63RNcIarH5LpEKNDd5BP/

Washington Post: Anxiety grows in Florida after Trump’s immigration order

The Washington Post reports that as President Donald Trump moves to turn the full force of the federal government toward deporting undocumented immigrants, a newfound fear of the future has already cast a pall over the tomato farms and strawberry fields in the largely undocumented migrant communities east of Tampa, Florida. Any day could be when deportations ramp up. Children have stopped playing in parks and the streets and businesses have grown quieter, as many have receded into the background, where they feel safe. Trump has repeatedly cast undocumented workers from Mexico as “bad hombres” and “lower-skilled workers with less education who compete directly against vulnerable American workers.” Trump made clear during his campaign that “those here illegally today, who are seeking legal status, they will have one route and one route only: to return home and apply for reentry like everybody else.”

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/after-trumps-immigration-order-anxiety-grows-in-floridas-vegetable-fields/2017/02/25/1539c4be-f915-11e6-be05-1a3817ac21a5_story.html?hpid=hp_rhp-top-table-main_scaredtown902pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.de5872cc78b6

San Francisco Chronicle: Immigration courts clogged with two-year backlog

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that with many more foreigners now facing possible deportation, immigration judges are likely to become overwhelmed with cases. Immigration courts, an arm of the Justice Department, have a nationwide backlog of 542,000 cases. In the San Francisco court, one of four in California, the backlog is more than 39,000. Immigrants free on bond, the practice in most cases, typically wait more than two years for a hearing on whether they will be deported. That’s nearly double the waiting time in 2008. Under the Trump administration, the wait times are about to grow substantially longer for an already overburdened immigration court system. While President Barack Obama’s administration reached near-record levels of deportations by focusing on what it said were immigrants who had committed serious crimes, new Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly has ordered removal of immigrants suspected of any crimes.

Read more: http://www.sfchronicle.com/nation/article/Immigration-courts-clogged-with-2-year-backlog-10959762.php

Columbus Dispatch: Replacement chemical for C8 raises health concerns

The Columbus Dispatch reports that scientists and activists who fought DuPont to stop the use of C8 sense deja vu with the spinoff company, Chemours, and GenX, a chemical that replaced C8. European officials announced that they will begin an intensive investigation of the compound next month. Since 2012, DuPont, and now Chemours, has been using GenX at plants in the United States and elsewhere to make non-stick Teflon and other products. Critics say GenX is no safer than C8 — also known as perfluorooctanoic acid or PFOA — which DuPont used for decades before investigations and lawsuits involving the chemical forced the company to halt production. The company lost four jury verdicts in federal court in Columbus and agreed this month to pay nearly $671 million to settle 3,500 lawsuits. Mid-Ohio Valley residents said they developed cancer and other ailments by drinking water contaminated with C8 that had been dumped in the Ohio River and spewed from smokestacks at DuPont's plant south of Parkersburg, West Virginia.

Read more: http://www.dispatch.com/news/20170225/replacement-chemical-for-c8-being-studied-amid-similar-health-concerns

Arizona Republic: Arizona may face new schools lawsuit over spending cuts

The Arizona Republic reports that less than a year after voters passed Proposition 123 to resolve a $1.6 billion lawsuit over school funding, a new, even larger education lawsuit looms — and almost nobody is talking about it. While the first lawsuit focused on underfunding per-student payments to schools for operational costs such as teacher salaries, this latest dispute centers on nearly a decade of cuts to capital funding for textbooks, technology, buses and building maintenance. Attorneys have warned of a lawsuit for years. Now, they say they could file one within the next month. Gov. Doug Ducey in his budget proposal included an additional $17 million to the School Facilities Board for building maintenance, but he continued hundreds of millions of dollars in annual cuts directly to schools for other school maintenance and soft capital such as technology. Since 2009, ongoing cuts in this area have topped $2 billion.

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/politics/arizona-education/2017/02/26/arizona-lawsuit-education-capital-funding-building-maintenance-technology-school-buses/98328544/

Toledo Blade: Asian carp continue push towards the Great Lakes

The Toledo Blade reports from Romeoville, Illinois, that while the battle to keep invasive Asian carp from entering the Great Lakes is more than four decades old and the front lines have continued to change, the enemy has not. These aggressive and prolific fish, first brought to this country under the premise that they would be a beneficial ally in efforts to control vegetation in the ponds used for raising native fishes, eventually escaped via flood waters and made their way into the Mississippi River system. On other occasions, Asian carp were likely unintentionally stocked in lakes and ponds, disguised in a shipment of what was believed to be fingerling catfish. Since reaching the Mississippi, Asian carp — primarily the most destructive silver and bighead species — have surged in every direction. Bighead and/or silver carp are now found throughout the Mississippi from New Orleans to Minnesota, and they have spread in the Missouri River system into the Dakotas and on the Ohio River as far upstream as Pittsburg.

Read more: http://www.toledoblade.com/Toledo-Magazine/2017/02/26/The-Outdoors-Page-Invasive-Asian-carp-continue-push-toward-the-Great-Lakes-Toledo-Magazine.html

Houston Chronicle: Texas builders fear fall out of immigration crackdown

The Houston Chronicle reports that at construction sites across Houston many of the tens of thousands of laborers building or rebuilding the sprawling metro region are immigrants in the country illegally. In Texas, an estimated 400,000 construction workers reside illegally, according to one study. If they were forced to leave the country, contractors say, state construction companies would face a difficult fallout, including higher labor costs, construction delays, and some projects canceled altogether. "Texas lives on immigrant labor," said Jeff Nielsen, executive vice president of the Houston Contractors Association. "Our economy is the way it is partly because cost of living is cheap and the reason for that is labor is cheap." Throughout his presidential campaign, Donald Trump advocated a "deportation force" to track down and remove millions of immigrants here illegally. This week, he moved closer to that goal with a memo instructing federal authorities to broaden the scope of targeted deportations.

Read more: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Texas-builders-fear-fallout-of-immigration-10959823.php

Arizona Daily Star: Trump border orders raise questions for Arizona sheriffs

The Arizona Daily Star reports that new federal directives aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration and border-related crime may appear straightforward, but how they are received by local law enforcement is far from simple. The sheriffs of Cochise, Pima and Yuma counties generally support the Trump administration’s evolving border policy, which took a leap forward last week with a memorandum from Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly. The sheriff of Santa Cruz County, on the other hand, has a more critical view of the policy. Although all four sheriffs support Kelly’s plan to fight cross-border criminal networks, they all balk at the idea of enforcing immigration laws. And various directives in the memo give the border sheriffs pause. Kelly ordered the hiring of 5,000 more Border Patrol agents, spurring Santa Cruz County Sheriff Antonio Estrada to ask: Why isn’t the federal government hiring more customs officers to catch hard drugs smuggled through ports of entry?

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/local/border/new-trump-border-orders-raise-questions-for-arizona-sheriffs/article_630d3787-a420-5807-9c10-062376f43ac2.html

Indianapolis Star: Last bitter days of an Indianapolis ball bearing plant

The Indianapolis Star reports John Feltner is about to lose his job as a machinist at Rexnord Corp., the ball bearings manufacturer that’s about to move work done for generations on Indianapolis’ west side to a new plant in Monterrey, Mexico. The phrase “shipping jobs to Mexico” has become rhetorical gold for politicians, but at Rexnord it's distastefully real. Of late, Feltner and his 350-plus co-workers at the Rockville Road plant have been boxing up machinery and shipping it to Mexico. Workers from Mexico are looking over their shoulders, trying to glean the skills Feltner and his union brothers have accumulated over years, even decades. Skills they’ve used to cut steel with precision and turn it into the mechanisms that turn axles on industrial machines and run conveyor belts for the mining industry and for firms like FedEx. Soon, the workers from Mexico will take what they’ve learned back to Monterrey and apply it to their new jobs. Jobs that union officials say will pay $3 an hour.

Read more: http://www.indystar.com/story/news/2017/02/24/m-scared-death-last-bitter-days-rexnord/98072314/

Minneapolis Star Tribune: Toxic vapors contaminate properties across state

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports toxic vapor rising from soils contaminated decades ago by industrial solvents is creating new and expensive headaches for property owners across Minnesota. Pollution officials have identified hundreds of sites across the state that are contaminated by “vapor intrusion,” and this month they began rolling out a new set of rules requiring property owners to test for vapors and address them before transferring property. Even as state officials scramble to understand the scope of the problem, business owners are facing millions of dollars in new costs to make their buildings — and their neighbors’ buildings — safe from the carcinogenic fumes that collect inside from widely used solvents long since discarded.

Read more: http://www.startribune.com/silent-but-toxic-chemical-vapors-contaminate-hundreds-of-properties-across-minnesota/414787933/

Democrat and Chronicle: Critics seek overhaul of police conduct review

The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle reports that Rochester's system for reviewing misconduct allegations against police officers remains heavily tilted toward the police and needs a complete overhaul to create a truly civilian-managed review board, according to a new report from some local civil rights organizations. "Our research indicates a lack of accountability and transparency within the RPD (Rochester Police Department), resulting in continued occurrences of police officer misconduct," states the report, The Case for an Independent Police Accountability System: Transforming the Civilian Review Process in Rochester, New YorkThe department's internal affairs process "involves the police investigating themselves, and there is no independent review of police misconduct that calls officers to account for their actions or enacts appropriate discipline that would deter the misconduct."

Read more: http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/2017/02/25/critics-seek-overhaul-police-conduct-review/98245834/

Philadelphia Inquirer: More murders in Philadelphia going unsolved

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports the city’s homicide clearance rate in 2016 dropped below 50 percent -- the lowest the city has seen in at least 15 years, and the third consecutive year that the rate has decreased, according to police statistics. While the Homicide Unit posted a clearance rate above 70 percent as recently as 2012 and 2013 -- nearly 10 points higher than the national average -- last year, when there were 277 murders, the rate was just 45.4 percent, meaning police arrested dozens fewer murder suspects than they had just a few years earlier. Theories for the downturn vary, from a slowly shrinking pool of homicide detectives, to a belief that media coverage of allegations of police brutality has fueled distrust in minority communities, worsening the decades-old challenge of finding cooperating witnesses.

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/news/crime/Philly-Police-clearing-fewer-murder-cases-2016-philadelphia-clearance-rate.htm

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Feb. 22, 2017

AP: Drugs vanish at some VA hospitals

The Associated Press reported federal authorities are stepping up investigations at Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers due to a sharp increase in opioid theft, missing prescriptions or unauthorized drug use by VA employees since 2009, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press. Doctors, nurses or pharmacy staff at federal hospitals — the vast majority within the VA system — siphoned away controlled substances for their own use or street sales, or drugs intended for patients simply disappeared. Aggravating the problem is that some VA hospitals have been lax in tracking drug supplies. Congressional auditors said spot checks found four VA hospitals skipped monthly inspections of drug stocks or missed other requirements. Investigators said that signals problems for VA's entire network of more than 160 medical centers and 1,000 clinics, coming after auditor warnings about lax oversight dating back to at least 2009.

Read more: http://www.expressnews.com/news/medical/article/AP-Exclusive-Drugs-vanish-at-some-VA-hospitals-10945197.php

AP: Hundreds of Texans may have voted improperly

The Associated Press reports Texas election officials have acknowledged that hundreds of people were allowed to bypass the state's toughest-in-the-nation voter ID law and improperly cast ballots in the November presidential election by signing a sworn statement instead of showing a photo ID. The chief election officers in two of the state's largest counties are now considering whether to refer cases to local prosecutors for potential perjury charges or violations of election law. Officials in many other areas say they will simply let the mistakes go, citing widespread confusion among poll workers and voters.  The Texas law requires voters to show one of seven approved forms of identification to cast ballots. It was softened in August to allow people without a driver's license or other photo ID to sign an affidavit declaring that they have an impediment to obtaining required identification.

Read more:  http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/texas/article/AP-Exclusive-Hundreds-of-Texans-may-have-voted-10942511.php

AP: DHS weighed National Guard for immigration roundups

The Associated Press reported the White House has distanced itself from a Department of Homeland Security draft proposal to use the National Guard to round up unauthorized immigrants, but lawmakers said the document offers insight into the Trump administration's internal efforts to enact its promised crackdown on illegal immigration. Administration officials said Feb. 17 the proposal, which called for mobilizing up to 100,000 troops in 11 states, was rejected, and would not be part of plans to carry out President Donald Trump's aggressive immigration policy. If implemented, the National Guard idea, contained in an 11-page memo obtained by The Associated Press, could have led to enforcement action against millions of immigrants living nowhere near the Mexican border. Four states that border on Mexico were included in the proposal — California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas — but it also encompassed seven states contiguous to those four — Oregon, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-trump-national-guard-immigration-20170217-story.html

AP Exclusive: If California dam failed, people likely stuck

The Associated Press reported communities immediately downstream of California's Lake Oroville dam would not receive adequate warning or time for evacuations if the 770-foot-tall dam itself — rather than its spillways — were to abruptly fail, the state water agency that operates the nation's tallest dam repeatedly advised federal regulators a half-decade ago. Regulators at the time recommended that state officials implement more public-warning systems, carry out annual public education campaigns and work to improve early detection of any problems at the dam. Six years later, state and local officials have adopted some of the recommendations, including automated warnings via reverse 911 calls to residents. But local officials say the state hasn't tackled other steps that could improve residents' response, such as providing routine community briefings and improving escape routes.

Read more: http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/ap-exclusive-warning-escape-route-lack-california-dam-45556795

Santa Fe New Mexican: Complaints of overcrowding plague women’s prison

The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that in October, the state moved more than half of New Mexico’s 750 female prison inmates from a privately operated prison near Grants to the Springer Correctional Center, a former boys’ school on 40 acres along the Cimarron River in Colfax County. Prison officials said the campus-style setting — featuring more than 30 buildings, including a gymnasium, dining hall and chapel — would allow the state to better accommodate a growing number of female inmates and was a more conducive place to provide minimum-security prisoners with programs that would help prevent them from returning to prison after their release. But prisoner advocates say the Springer facility is already dangerously overcrowded and understaffed, and many of the prisoners there — most of whom were convicted of drug-related crimes — should already have been released on parole and be reintegrating into their home communities.

Read more: http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/local_news/complaints-of-overcrowding-plague-springer-women-s-prison/article_f66c13a5-2b5a-5661-ab17-057f9d9d0ad6.html

Sun Sentinel: Being “under observation” in hospital can cost seniors

The Fort Lauderdale Sun Sentinel reports that if you’re a senior on Medicare, and you stay at a hospital under “observation status,” you may end up with serious financial pain. That’s because Medicare may not cover some benefits — including post-hospital rehabilitation care in a nursing home — if a hospitalized patient is classified as being under observation vs. being admitted as an inpatient. Medicare Part A, which pays hospital costs, requires beneficiaries to have three consecutive inpatient hospital days to qualify for nursing home care. Observation days don’t count toward that total. It’s a big concern in Florida, where state advocacy groups and health coalitions have pushed for observation status reform.

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/fl-medicare-hospital-observation-stays-limit-coverage-20170214-story.html

Washington Post: Sweeping new guidelines for deporting illegal immigrants

The Washington Post reports Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly has signed sweeping new guidelines not released publicly that empower federal authorities to more aggressively detain and deport illegal immigrants inside the United States and at the border. In a pair of memos, Kelly offered more detail on plans for the agency to hire thousands of additional enforcement agents, expand the pool of immigrants who are prioritized for removal, speed up deportation hearings and enlist local law enforcement to help make arrests. The new directives would supersede nearly all of those issued under previous administrations, Kelly said, including measures from President Barack Obama aimed at focusing deportations exclusively on hardened criminals and those with terrorist ties.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/memos-signed-by-dhs-secretary-describe-sweeping-new-guidelines-for-deporting-illegal-immigrants/2017/02/18/7538c072-f62c-11e6-8d72-263470bf0401_story.html?utm_term=.bf842e530a49

Minneapolis Star Tribune: Health regulators can’t keep up with abuse reports

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports that nearly two years after launching a statewide abuse reporting hot line, Minnesota regulators are overwhelmed by a deluge of new reports alleging abuse and neglect of vulnerable adults in nursing homes, hospitals and other state-licensed facilities. The hot line has produced a surge in maltreatment complaints that far exceeds the investigative resources of the Minnesota Department of Health. As a result, thousands of injuries, assaults, thefts and medical errors alleged by friends and relatives are going uninvestigated — depriving families and facility managers of vital evidence that could be used to improve care. Health investigators have fallen so far behind that Minnesota is running afoul of state and federal laws requiring prompt reviews. In 85 percent of the cases, the agency is failing to complete its investigations within statutory time frames, state data shows.

Read more: http://www.startribune.com/minnesota-health-regulators-can-t-keep-up-with-abuse-reports/414169273/

New York Times: A peak at the exclusive members list at Mar-a-Lago

The New York Times reports that virtually overnight, Mar-a-Lago, President Donald Trump’s members-only Palm Beach, Florida, club, has been transformed into the part-time capital of American government, a so-called winter White House where  Trump has entertained a foreign head of state, health care industry executives and other presidential guests. Trump’s gatherings at Mar-a-Lago have also created an arena for potential political influence rarely seen in American history: a kind of Washington steakhouse on steroids, situated in a sunny playground of the rich and powerful, where members and their guests enjoy a level of access that could elude even the best-connected of lobbyists. Membership lists reviewed by The New York Times show that the club’s nearly 500 paying members include dozens of real estate developers, Wall Street financiers, energy executives and others whose businesses could be affected by Trump’s policies.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/18/us/mar-a-lago-trump-ethics-winter-white-house.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=b-lede-package-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Chemicals left in barrels leave workers at risk

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports a group of industrial drum reconditioning plants owned in part by Greif Inc., a $3.3 billion industrial packaging company that entered the business of reconditioning plastic containers and 55-gallon steel drums in 2010, has disregarded safe practices for handling hazardous materials, harming workers and endangering those who live nearby, as well as the environment. The newspaper said its investigation found practices at the six facilities have resulted in workers suffering chemical and heat-related burns, injuries from exploding barrels, breathing difficulties and other health problems. The operations have caused at least one big fire — heavily damaging an Indianapolis facility, endangering nearby residents and firefighters.  The plants have been cited repeatedly by regulators for dumping too much mercury in the wastewater and toxic emissions into the neighborhood air.

Read more: http://projects.jsonline.com/news/2017/2/15/chemicals-left-in-barrels-leave-many-at-risk.html

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Guard watched as inmate killed himself

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that officer John Calhoun was on duty in the isolation-segregation unit at Smith State Prison in South Georgia late on a Sunday night when he witnessed a disturbing sight. Inside Cell J1-124, Richard Tavera, a 24-year-old inmate with a history of mental problems, was looping one end of a bedsheet around a sprinkler on the ceiling and the other end around his neck. Calhoun immediately recognized that he was dealing with a life-or-death situation, but he chose not to enter the cell. Instead, following regulations, he called for help. Then he watched and waited as Tavera hanged himself. The state’s lawyers wrote in court filings that the officers did nothing wrong and were only following protocol designed to protect prison staff from inmates who fake illness for nefarious purposes.

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/public-affairs/guards-stood-and-watched-georgia-inmate-hanged-himself/8X0qFoSVGeGrNdLy3j0yfK/

Arizona Republic: No more “courtesy holds” for federal immigration agents.

The Arizona Republic reports that not long ago Arizona’s Maricopa County was regarded as the country’s most hostile locality for those living in the United States illegally. With a combination of anti-immigration state laws and a sheriff to enforce them zealously, the county became a deportation machine, its jails accounting for more immigration holds than anywhere else in the country. But less than two months into his tenure as Maricopa County sheriff, Paul Penzone, has unveiled his first major policy change: MCSO jails no longer would detain individuals for Immigration and Customs Enforcement. All inmates, legal residents or not, will be released from jail when the period of time for detention authorized under Arizona state law is up. Until Feb. 17, the jail would issue courtesy “detainers” for the federal government, jailing individuals for up to 48 hours longer than they would otherwise be held for their criminal case, and setting in motion deportation proceedings.

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/phoenix/2017/02/18/ice-calls-sheriff-paul-penzone-new-maricopa-county-jail-policy-immediate-dangerous-change/98101514/

Montgomery Advertiser: Alabama has biggest dam problem in U.S.

The Montgomery Advertiser reports Alabama is the only state without a dam safety program, a program that requires not only annual maintenance and inspection, but crucial record keeping on dams' conditions and how heavily a breach would affect residents downstream. The recent collapse of the Oroville Dam spillway in California aside, Alabama may have the biggest dam problem in the country. After the catastrophe in Oroville, where 200,000 people below the dam were evacuated as a precaution due to a combination of high water level and damage to the spillway, Diana Enright with the Oregon Water Resources Department did something Alabama has no ability to do: She checked her state's dam data. Of Oregon’s 15,000 dams, Enright said 75 are classified as high-hazard — dams that would most likely kill people after a failure. Of those, seven are currently in "unsatisfactory" condition. “Those are more closely inspected,” Enright said. Alabama is the only state in the country that can't check those numbers.

Read more: http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/local/community/2017/02/17/alabama-has-biggest-dam-problem-us/97945728/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Feb. 15, 2017

Santa Fe New Mexican: County not utilizing 7-year-old ethics board

The Santa Fe New Mexican reports it hardly mattered when Santa Fe County commissioners in January appointed two new members to the county’s ethics board, filling vacancies that had been open for months. The board was established in 2010 in response to a bribery scandal involving a road-paving firm and a former county official that led to criminal convictions. But county attorneys have never asked the board to investigate a complaint about a potential ethics violation by an appointed or elected official or volunteer. Also tasked with recommending changes to the county’s code of conduct, board members had proposed measures to put more teeth into the rules they’re charged with enforcing. The effort proved fruitless. The terms for two more unpaid volunteers on the five-member watchdog body will expire at the end of February. One of those outgoing board members told The New Mexican that the panel stopped holding regular meetings in the spring of 2016.

Read more: http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/local_news/county-not-utilizing--year-old-ethics-board/article_f95534b2-cd71-555f-a575-426e9d8f5234.html

Sacramento Bee: Hiring spree in California as pension reform looms

The Sacramento Bee reports that on the eve of major pension changes that would crimp retirement benefits for new hires, a handful of California government agencies went on a holiday hiring spree. Their timing was fortuitous. By beginning work in the waning days of 2012, the employees enrolled in the California Public Employees’ Retirement System just in time to gain a generous pension formula adopted during the dot-com boom of 1999 that allowed most public workers to retire at age 55. By contrast, most employees hired after Jan. 1, 2013, would have to work until age 67 to gain their full benefits. Across the state, 707 people started work at local governments and state departments that participated in CalPERS during the last week of 2012. Another 64 employees from the city of Coalinga joined CalPERS that week, meaning 771 public workers entered the network just in time to become eligible for the expiring benefits.

Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/news/investigations/the-public-eye/article132104954.html

Sun Sentinel: High price for eye-catching Fort Lauderdale parking garage

The Sun sentinel reports an eye-catching parking garage planned on the beach comes with an eye-catching price. The five-level structure at the base of the Las Olas Boulevard bridge will cost almost $21 million, or $31,460 per parking space. By comparison, the 2016 Miami-area average is $16,600 a space, according to national parking consultant Carl Walker Inc. The Broward County Courthouse garage came in at around $18,487 a space, and a 1,000-space Rick Case dealership garage in Davie cost about $17,155 a space, said Paul Kissinger, who heads up the EDSA architectural firm team of Fort Lauderdale, which designed the new beach garage.

Kissinger said the city's garage, which will begin construction in March, will be dramatically different from those two. It will be part of a growing urban trend of turning traditionally drab parking places into stunning architectural statements.

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fort-lauderdale/fl-fort-lauderdale-beach-parking-garage-cost-20170211-story.html

Miami Herald: CIA files show psychics used in hostage crisis to spy on Iran 

The Miami Herald reports that U.S. intelligence agencies had a squad of military-trained psychics using ESP to watch the dozens of American diplomats taken hostage by revolutionary students who seized the U.S. Embassy in Iran in 1979, according to declassified documents in a newly available CIA database. Whether the psychics provided any useful intelligence was the subject of a debate among intelligence officials as heated as it was secret. In an operation code-named Grill Flame, half a dozen psychics working inside a dimly lit room in an ancient building in Fort Meade, Maryland, on more than 200 occasions tried to peer through the ether to see where the hostages were being held, how closely they were guarded and the state of their health. Officially, the psychics worked for U.S. Army intelligence. But the documents in the CIA database make it clear their efforts were monitored — and supported — by a wide array of government intelligence agencies as well as top commanders at the Pentagon.

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/national/article131827589.html

Orlando Sentinel: Florida school districts wrestle with teacher shortage

The Orlando Sentinel reports a billboard on the busy street just off campus calls out to students unsure about life after college:  “Become a Hero,” it reads. “Teachers Needed.” The giant orange message is one of two put up near the University of Central Florida by the Orange County school district, literal signs of how eager the region’s largest school district is to recruit more teachers. In the past two years, Orange schools added at least 10,000 new students, more than any other district in Florida. The district hired more than 1,800 new teachers for the current school year and expects to need more by summer, as it opens six new schools. It now has nearly 80 teacher vacancies. Orange administrators and their counterparts across the region and the state face a teacher shortage, one that has prompted them to ramp up recruitment strategies ahead of the 2017-18 school year.

Read more: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/education/school-zone/os-florida-schools-teacher-shortages-universities-20170203-story.html

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Georgia PTA split by race and rivalry

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports the staid reputation of the Georgia PTA is being riven by allegations of strong-arm politics and toxic rivalries that are pushing members away. The board of directors, which is supposed to represent the interests of parents, teachers and children, staged what vanquished former members describe as a hostile takeover with racial overtones. In recent months, a controlling faction of the board voted off several peers, black and white. There are questions about an election where more ballots were counted than there were delegates voting, plus claims that clever alterations to policies and procedures allowed the faction to hijack the organization. It peaked last month when the board removed its president, a white woman who led the PTA to a prominent political victory that earned a national award for advocacy.

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/local-education/race-and-rivalry-splits-georgia-pta/2bToSGL0eivpUWOKQOWG1O/

Chicago Tribune: Juries may punish officers, but penalties often negotiable

The Chicago Tribune reports its analysis of court records has found that in case after case  the state law that requires police officers to pay punitive damages in civil lawsuits is routinely undercut by negotiations absolving them of the penalties. Of the nearly $1.1 million in punitive damages awarded in police misconduct verdicts the city has paid to resolve since 2009, the Tribune found that Chicago police officers were ultimately responsible for nearly $285,000, an analysis of court records shows. To legal experts, that only undermines the law's intent, which is not only to punish individual officers but also to deter their peers from engaging in similar misconduct. To officers, the fact that some of the awards do stand shows that they can be exposed financially.  The fear of having to pay, they say, can have a crippling effect on their willingness to do police work.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-police-punitive-damages-met-20170212-story.html

Des Moines Register: Iowa’s rising child homicides raising concern

The Des Moines Register reports that a rising number of Iowa children have been victims of homicide the past three years — from abuse, shootings and unsupervised accidents. At least 20 Iowa children died last year, including 11 from suspected abuse, a Reader's Watchdog probe of cases statewide found. The children included Natalie Finn, the West Des Moines 16-year-old who was tortured and starved to death in October. But they also included six children who drowned, four who were fatally shot, one who died when his father crashed and another who was left in a sweltering vehicle. The review of 2016 deaths, culled from media reports across the state, underscores what Iowa's Child Death Review Team noticed after completing research on child deaths from 2013 and 2014. "It's safe to say homicide deaths are on the increase," said John Kraemer, coordinator of the volunteer team, which operates out of the State Medical Examiner's Office.

Read more: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/investigations/readers-watchdog/2017/02/11/iowas-rising-child-homicides-heighten-concerns-over-youth-deaths/97464656/

Baltimore Sun: Carjacking becoming a “youth sport” as numbers climb

The Baltimore Sun reports carjackings in Baltimore have more than tripled since 2013, and the number has continued to climb in the first weeks of 2017, at a rate that has far outpaced other auto thefts. Some other U.S. cities are also seeing increases. Law enforcement officers and analysts see several reasons for the spike. Police in Baltimore note that the overwhelming majority of suspects are young men or juveniles, emboldened by the relative ease of the crime, and a belief that if they're caught, the courts will not treat them harshly. Some see the increase as an unintended consequence of better antitheft security. Electronic key fobs and codes, required to start newer-model cars, have made them more difficult to steal — unless the driver is present. And it's easier to resell a car that has been driven away with its keys than one that's been hotwired, its windows smashed and its steering column busted.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/bs-md-ci-carjack-20170211-story.html

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Lawmakers benefit from a push to limit lawsuits

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports Missouri state Sen. Gary Romine, sponsor of a bill that seeks to make it harder to sue businesses for racial discrimination, says the measure will improve “Missouri’s legal climate.” It also could improve Romine’s personal legal climate, making it less likely that his “rent-to-own” furniture business will face any more racial discrimination lawsuits like the one it has been embroiled in for almost two years. Romine, R-Farmington, isn’t the only lawmaker in Jefferson City who is trying to change the law to protect businesses from lawsuits in ways that could theoretically protect his own bottom line as well. Another Republican senator, who is a veterinarian, is sponsoring legislation to put new limits on malpractice suits against veterinarians. And the Senate’s top Republican is trying to change a state consumer-protection law that is currently being used to sue one of his biggest campaign contributors.

Read more: http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/missouri-republicans-push-to-limit-lawsuits-could-have-unexpected-beneficiaries/article_74be21d5-7860-5223-8431-3fb6e10a6602.html

New York Times: Federal civil servants shaken by Trump transition

The New York Times reports Donald J. Trump’s arrival in the White House has spread anxiety, frustration, fear and resistance among many of the two million nonpolitical civil servants who say they work for the public, not a particular president. At the Environmental Protection Agency, a group of scientists strategized this past week about how to slow-walk President Trump’s environmental orders without being fired. At the Treasury Department, civil servants are quietly gathering information about whistle-blower protections as they polish their résumés. At the United States Digital Service — the youthful cadre of employees who left jobs at Google, Facebook or Microsoft to join the Obama administration — workers are debating how to stop Mr. Trump should he want to use the databases they made more efficient to target specific immigrant groups.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/11/us/politics/a-sense-of-dread-for-civil-servants-shaken-by-trump-transition.html?_r=0

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Rental inspections could displace poor families

The Cleveland Plain Dealer reports that if an ethical or moral standard were applied to inspecting Cleveland's low-income rental homes for safety, Mayor Frank Jackson says about three quarters of them would be "closed up." Jackson made the comment last week when discussing the city's long awaited and soon-to-be implemented plan to start citywide inspections of rental units in response to its ongoing lead poisoning crisis. That crisis was revealed in 2015 by The Plain Dealer's Toxic Neglect series, which brought to light serious failings in how the city responded to cases of childhood lead poisoning. The dilemma, as Jackson explained it: if the city too quickly or too aggressively inspects rental properties for health hazards and safety violations such as peeling paint, mold and broken toilets, families may be put out of their homes and landlords unable to rent their properties.

Read more: http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2017/02/cleveland_mayor_frank_jackson.html

Oregonian: Nine myths about Oregon’s pension fund

The Oregonian reports the growing deficit in the public pension fund is a massive overhang on Oregon's budget and its future. Government employers - and ultimately taxpayers - will see their required contributions soar over the next six years, sucking some $12 billion out of public coffers to mostly pay for legacy costs tied to older members and retirees. That's about double what the bill would be at current rates. At least that's the scenario if the pension fund's investments perform as expected. If they don't, the deficit and contributions could get even bigger. As lawmakers meet this session to determine what can be done to reduce the Public Employee Retirement System's funding deficit, there is misunderstanding and misinformation about the topic and options for dealing with it. Here are some of the common myths around PERS, as well as some areas of debate.

Read more: http://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2017/02/pers_9_myths_about_oregons_pub.html

Philadelphia Inquirer: Public schools fight to win back charter school students

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports Quakertown Community spends about $2 million each year on students who choose to attend charters rather than their public schools. As tuition payments to charters bite ever deeper into the budgets of virtually every district in the region, some are beginning aggressive campaigns to win kids back. Their strategies range from direct-mail marketing, to boisterous “back-to-school” rallies with bouncy castles, to pricey new programs such as all-day kindergarten. The drive to woo students away from charters, or persuade them not to enroll in the first place, is high-stakes. At the start of the 2015-16 school year in New Jersey, an estimated 42,000 attended charters. In Pennsylvania, there were nearly 135,000, or 65,000 more than in 2007-08. Much of that 97 percent increase occurred in the Philadelphia region.

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/education/Schools-step-up-fight-to-win-back-charter-students.html

Austin American-Statesman: FAA missed chance to ground balloon pilot

The Austin American-Statesman reports Alfred “Skip” Nichols, the chief pilot and owner of the Heart of Texas Balloon Rides, shouldn’t have been flying on the morning of July 30, 2016, when he crashed and died along with 15 passengers. Two years earlier, the Federal Aviation Administration had learned of his lengthy criminal record of alcohol-related driving offenses. Nichols had violated FAA rules by not voluntarily disclosing any of the five incidents, any one of which could have led to the loss of his license. But, in a move that aviation attorneys and experts say is highly unusual, the FAA investigators chose to take no action. Instead of suspending or revoking his pilot’s license, they sent him a warning letter.

Read more: http://www.mystatesman.com/news/local/faa-missed-chance-ground-balloon-pilot-before-deadly-lockhart-crash/0GAh2aFwMRafTRPNvL8wxH/

Houston Chronicle: Oppositions solidifies against concrete batch plants

The Houston Chronicle reports that for the past year noise from the Integrity Ready Mix plant has plagued residents of Lindale Farms, a neighborhood north of Houston where beauty shops and garages are wedged between rows of homes. Operations like these - called concrete batch plants - play a vital role in Houston by producing the ready-mix concrete used for new buildings and roads. They are given license, by the state, to operate around-the-clock and, by the city, to locate in residential areas. But the plants can be a nuisance for people who live next to them, and they tend to cluster in working-class, minority neighborhoods like Lindale Farms. In south Houston, for example, 18 concrete batch plants sit within a 4-mile radius. A Houston Chronicle analysis shows that Harris County has 188 concrete batch plants, more than any county in Texas and twice the number in Dallas County. Industry officials predict that number will increase over the coming decade as Houston grows.

Read more: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Opposition-solidifies-against-Houston-s-concrete-10925815.php

Seattle Times: The O.R. factory: High volume, big dollars, rising tension

The Seattle Times reports Swedish-Cherry Hill, one of Seattle’s esteemed medical institutions, has seen its neuroscience unit become a hub for the treatment of debilitating conditions of the brain and spine. Ruptured aneurysms. Brain tumors. Mangled spines. The unit’s star surgeons attract patients from all over the Pacific Northwest. But there’s another story behind that sterling reputation. In recent years, a chorus of staff members has warned about issues of patient safety, of concerning practices, of a culture that has gone astray.  Patients may never notice the turmoil going on behind the scenes or the issues that have raised so much concern unless things go wrong. In some cases, things have.  

Read more: https://projects.seattletimes.com/2017/quantity-of-care/hospital/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Feb. 8, 2017

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Man not guilty on gun charges still sent to prison

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports a jury found Damien Payne not guilty of being a felon in possession of a firearm and of carrying a concealed weapon, but he was still sent to prison for more than three years. That’s because Payne, who got out of prison in 2010, was being supervised by the Department of Corrections at the time. As a result, he was subject to a little-known department rule that says it doesn’t matter if ex-offenders on probation or parole are acquitted — they can be sent back to prison based on the same allegations. Payne, 35, said he didn’t know his girlfriend’s gun was in the glove compartment of his car when he was pulled over in July. The jury believed him. His probation and parole agent didn’t.

Read more: http://www.jsonline.com/story/news/investigations/2017/02/04/man-not-guilty-gun-charges-trial-but-still-sent-prison-wisconsin/97359244/

American-Statesman: Why teachers accused of improprieties aren’t charged

The American Statesman reports that hundreds of Texas primary and secondary teachers lost or surrendered their teaching licenses since 2010 after being investigated for improper relationships with a student. More than half were never criminally charged. In all of those cases, information about the alleged misconduct isn’t easily accessible from the Texas Education Agency and in many instances is kept secret by school districts, allowing those teachers to move on to other teaching jobs or jobs involving contact with children. The American-Statesman reviewed the cases of 686 teachers who surrendered their teaching licenses or whose teaching licenses were revoked by the Texas Education Agency between 2010 and 2016, after the TEA launched investigations for possible improper teacher-student relationships.

Read more: http://www.statesman.com/news/why-many-texas-teachers-accused-improprieties-are-never-charged/TfA3pzNAhEzlpld2Qc48BL/

Philadelphia Inquirer: Parking authority brass padded salaries 

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that three months after Vincent Fenerty Jr. lost his $223,000-a-year job as executive director of the Philadelphia Parking Authority, he pocketed a $227,000 check for nearly 2,000 hours of vacation time, paid leave, and comp time. But Fenerty, forced out of the agency in September amid sexual-harassment complaints, isn’t the only PPA boss who stashed away comp time. Records show that more than a dozen senior PPA staffers at the longtime patronage haven accumulated significant amounts of comp time – in some cases hundreds of hours – while earning six-figure salaries to run agency departments or oversee its finances. Last month, the PPA responded to a Right-to-Know request filed by the Inquirer and Daily News by claiming the agency “does not have records of comp time” and how it was used by Fenerty or “any other” senior staffers. When pressed, PPA officials reversed course and produced a list showing that, in fact, most senior staffers have a running balance of comp time, some of it going back years.

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/news/pennsylvania/Parking_authority_brass_padded_salaries_with_comp_time.html

Toledo Blade: Overtime puts sheriff’s deputy at top of payroll

The Toledo Blade reports Eric Grace, a sheriff’s office employee who works at the Lucas County jail, racked up nearly $79,000 in overtime on top of his $49,000 salary in 2016. His total paycheck last year was more than $132,000. The 280 eight-hour overtime shifts worked by Deputy Grace were the most logged by any of the sheriff office’s nearly 500 unionized employees. Sheriff’s office overtime, especially that paid to jail correction officers, is under scrutiny as county officials are looking to reduce spending to offset a projected $10-million revenue loss in state funds next year. Cost-cutting efforts are occurring at the same time that county commissioners are sharing their vision on the model of a future jail to the union representing correction officers. That plan would require using about half the present work force.

Overall compensation for jail employees has edged up 19 percent since 2013, when Sheriff John Tharp was elected.

Read more: https://www.toledoblade.com/Police-Fire/2017/02/05/Mountain-of-overtime-hours-puts-deputy-at-top-of-payroll.html

Washington Post: Documents show Trump still benefitting from his business

The Washington Post reports that before taking office, President Trump promised to place his assets in a trust designed to erect a wall between him and the businesses that made him wealthy. But newly released documents show that Trump himself is the sole beneficiary of the trust and that it is legally controlled by his oldest son and a longtime employee. The documents, obtained through a public records request by the investigative news service ProPublica and first reported by the New York Times, also show that Trump retains the legal power to revoke the trust at any time. The documents were filed to the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board in Washington to alert the board that oversees liquor licenses at Trump’s D.C. hotel of the change in the business. The documents show that Donald Trump Jr., the president’s eldest son, and Allen Weisselberg, the Trump Organization’s chief financial officer, were placed in legal control of the trust on Jan. 19, one day before Trump took office.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/documents-confirm-trump-still-benefiting-from-his-business/2017/02/04/848fdd5a-eae0-11e6-bf6f-301b6b443624_story.html?utm_term=.92288760e2b1

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Why does city pay $84,000 a year for vacant land?

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that for nearly eight years, the city of Chesterfield has made an annual expenditure of roughly $84,000 that even some of the city’s highest-ranking officials can’t explain. “There was never a discussion, to my knowledge, about how this property would be used,” said Chesterfield City Administrator Mike Geisel. The property is a 1.4-acre vacant gravel lot that sits next to old train tracks. Chesterfield has leased the former brickyard since 2009. The city must keep making the $6,500-a-month rent payments until the 10-year lease ends in March 2019. The agreement also obligates the city to pay the property taxes, which were $7,458 last year. In all, Chesterfield taxpayers will spend roughly $850,000 and receive no discernible benefit.

Read more: http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/why-does-chesterfield-spend-a-year-on-a-piece-of/article_f55f78cf-1f7c-58ed-80be-0c7d993fd6e1.html

Courier-Journal: Beef prices stay high but cattle farmers take hit

The Courier-Journal reports that beef, one of the most valuable farm crops from the bluegrass state, used to generate $1 billion in sales annually. Now Kentucky cattle farmers are barely breaking even or losing money for the 1 million young cows, steer or calves sold each year to fatten in feedlots out west. While cattle farmers lose about half of their income, supermarket beef prices have barely budged, edging downward about 10 percent, according to CattleFax, a beef industry analyst firm. The bottom line? Just because the price of a calf sold to a feedlot for fattening and slaughter has tumbled doesn't mean the consumer can find a bargain filet at the supermarket. Beef cost an average $6 per pound in 2015. That historic high slipped to only $5.74 in 2016, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Like the oil industry, the food industry is highly segmented by middlemen and driven by huge corporate players and volatile trading markets.

Read only: http://www.courier-journal.com/story/life/food/farm-to-table/2017/02/03/beef-prices-dont-budge-while-kentucky-farmers-take-hit/96120414/

Des Moines Register: Sex abusers escape prison time in Iowa

The Des Moines Register reports that since 2007, 17 Iowans working in professions that required them to report suspected child abuse were themselves convicted of sex crimes against children that should have sent them to prison. Instead, they received suspended prison sentences or had their conviction removed from their record in violation of state law. Last year, the Register first reported on seven of the 17 cases involving educators convicted of sex crimes, part of a five-year review that ended in 2016. The Register's latest investigation examined more than 7,800 defendants charged with sex crimes since 2007, finding 75 who were specifically identified as counselors, therapists or school employees. The examination found 10 additional defendants who were convicted of sex crimes with juveniles but received suspended sentences or deferred judgments, even though that's prohibited by Iowa law.

Read more: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/investigations/2017/02/04/iowa-sex-abusers-escape-mandatory-prison-time-how-possible/96214678/

Miami Herald: Is Florida moving too slow to save the Everglades?

The Miami Herald reports that when you’re zooming over the vast Everglades in a helicopter, it’s easy to see how much work is being done to revive the wilted watershed. But at ground level, the view is far different, with sides squared off in bitter fight over just how much remains to be done, and at what pace. For the second year in a row, a proposed $2.4 billion reservoir included in original plans and envisioned somewhere in the sugar fields that now dominate the landscape south of the lake is taking center stage. State Senate President Joe Negron, his Treasure Coast constituents repeatedly hammered by dirty water from Lake Okeechobee, and environmentalists want to speed up its construction by years. Gov. Rick Scott and farmers, however, see the reservoir as a job-killing land grab and say efforts should focus north of the lake, where water storage projects are already underway. The National Academies of Sciences also issued a dismal assessment earlier this year, citing problems that have dogged the $16.4 billion state-federal restoration project almost since its inception in 2000: bureaucratic creep and chronic underfunding.
Read more:
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/environment/article130702984.html

Sun Sentinel: Airport gun procedures unchanged at Fort Lauderdale

The Sun Sentinel reports month after five tourists were shot and killed at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, the procedures for handling guns have not changed and tougher regulations appear unlikely. Broward County, which owns the airport, can't stop people from flying with checked guns or ammunition; legislators in the past have been reluctant to restrict guns; police don't know who's flying in with weapons; and only airlines can control how people pick up those firearms. The best the county can do is ask the sheriff to assign more deputies to the airport, officials said. Broward Mayor Barbara Sharief said she's frustrated that the Jan. 6 shooting hasn't led to a firm proposal for change. "I'm tired of talking. I feel very frustrated about the talking and grandstanding," Sharief said. "Five people lost their lives very senselessly. We need to find a way to prevent that from happening ever again in the United States."

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/fort-lauderdale-hollywood-airport-shooting/fl-fll-florida-airport-gun-laws-20170205-story.html

San Diego Union-Tribune: Nuclear plant power players still fighting

The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that it’s been five years since the San Onofre nuclear plant closed amid billowing steam and leaking radiation. A $680 million steam generator replacement that was supposed to add 40 years of life to the aging plant instead brought its premature demise. Now the twin reactors on the north San Diego County coast generate drama and political intrigue instead of electricity to serve millions of Southern Californians. The failures that led to the premature closing of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station prompted a swarm of investigations, lawsuits and legislation that continues to unfold from here to Sacramento. Much of the scrutiny has centered on the relationship between majority owner Southern California Edison in Rosemead and state regulators at the California Public Utilities Commission in San Francisco.

Read more: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/watchdog/sd-me-san-onofre-indepth-20170202-story.html

Modesto Bee: Modesto braces for spike in pension costs

The Modesto Bee reports Modesto has done the math to gauge the impact of a recent decision that will require it and thousands of other public sector agencies across California to pay more for employee and retiree pensions. The numbers are not pretty. Modesto could be paying as much as $13.5 million more to the California Public Employees’ Retirement System in several years. As a point of reference, the city expects to pay CalPERS $23.3 million in its current budget year. The public sector agencies will pay more because the CalPERS board voted in December to lower its discount rate from 7.5 percent to 7 percent. The rate is what CalPERS expects to earn on its investments. Lower investment earnings mean larger contributions from the roughly 3,000 agencies that belong to CalPERS. Public employees also contribute to the pension system, and newer employees will see their contributions rise.

Read more: http://www.modbee.com/news/article130812734.html

Santa Fe New Mexican: Courts feel crunch amid economic scarcity 

The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that every year, legislators descend on the Roundhouse clutching fistfuls of tough-on-crime bills aimed at keeping New Mexicans safe, and, cynics might say, helping themselves to get re-elected. Right behind them come officials from the state judiciary and related agencies, hats in hand, begging for more money with which to prosecute, defend and incarcerate the state’s defendants. This year, with the state mired in a fiscal crisis and the courts and public defenders warning that they may soon be unable to pay juries or defend the indigent, the pleas have reached piercing levels, pitting court officials against the governor and unleashing partisan bickering in the Legislature. The latest skirmish came when Gov. Susana Martinez used her line-item veto power to excise $800,000 in emergency funding for the courts from a routine bill passed by lawmakers to pay for the 60-day legislative session.

Read more: http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/legislature/courts-feel-crunch-amid-economic-scarcity/article_a6d41550-4c27-54b2-8e40-67e1968c5162.html

Los Angeles Times: An Apache reservation’s toxic legacy

The Los Angeles Times reports how planes delivered a chemical cocktail with components similar to Agent Orange known as Silvex as part of a little-known test effort from 1961 to 1972 to wipe out water-hungry vegetation on the San Carlos Apache Reservation. It was part of a larger effort by the federal government to protect scarce groundwater in the newly booming city of Phoenix. The dioxin-laden herbicide was spread over a population of 10,000 for more than a decade. Now, half a century later, the federal Environmental Protection Agency is sending investigators to the reservation this month to find out exactly what was sprayed and what lingering effects it may have on one of the nation’s poorest Native American reservations. “It’s in our air, our streams, our livestock,” said Charles Vargas, an activist on the reservation, 90 miles northeast of Phoenix.  “This is fundamentally a crime, perpetrated on our people by the government, and no one’s ever had to answer for it.”

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-agent-orange-arizona-2017-story.html

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Feb. 1, 2017

AP: US military flailing in online fight against Islamic State

The Associated Press reports a counter-propaganda program aimed at thwarting Islamic State recruiting over social media is plagued by incompetence, cronyism and skewed data, an AP investigation has found. Known as "WebOps," the program was launched several years ago by a small group of civilian contractors and military officers assigned to the information operations division at U.S. Central Command's headquarters in Tampa. But internal documents and interviews with more than a dozen people knowledgeable about WebOps suggest a program that appears aimed more at enriching contractors than thwarting terrorism. The people interviewed by AP requested anonymity because they are prohibited from speaking publicly about WebOps due to the sensitive nature of the work and they fear professional repercussions.

Read more: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/us-bid-to-counter-isis-online-recruiting-webops-inept-ap-finds/

Oregonian: Lawmakers pay their business with campaign funds. It’s legal.

The Oregonian reports that 18 times in the last decade Oregon state Sen. Kim Thatcher’s campaign account has written checks to businesses she owns. It's all perfectly legal, and Thatcher, a Republican from Keizer, says she was given approval by elections officials to make the payments. But the transactions raise questions about how the campaign accounts of state lawmakers intersect with their private businesses. Campaign donors expect their money to be spent getting candidates elected. The wrinkle is, it's unusual for candidates to pay themselves in the process. "Are there ethical flags raised? All over the place," said Jim Moore, professor and director of Pacific University's Tom McCall Center for Policy Innovation. He characterized lawmakers hiring their own businesses with campaign funds as "something akin to money laundering." Thatcher isn't the only Oregon legislator who has tapped campaign funds to pay their business or nonprofit. At least 10 others have made such payments in the last decade, records show.

Read more: http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/01/oregon_lawmakers_pay_their_businesses.html

Albuquerque Journal: People leaving New Mexico in unprecedented numbers 

The Albuquerque Journal reports that since 2010, the number of people living in New Mexico has remained virtually stagnant, compared with significant population increases in neighboring states, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. From 2010 to 2016, New Mexico registered total population growth of just 1.1 percent, compared with 10 percent in Colorado and Utah, nearly 11 percent in Texas and 8 percent in Arizona, according to the Census Bureau. Brian Sanderoff, president of Research & Polling Inc., analyzed the census numbers for the Journal and concluded that the population stagnation is unprecedented in New Mexico history. Sanderoff and a University of New Mexico population expert attributed the lack of population growth to a faltering economy – one hit by a national recession, federal spending cuts and, more recently, a crash in prices of oil and natural gas.

Read more: https://www.abqjournal.com/938035/exodus.html

Sunday Star Ledger: Fentanyl’s OD deaths could top heroin’s

The Sunday Star Ledger reports that for law enforcement fighting fatal overdoses in New Jersey’s Middlesex County it seems like one step forward and two steps back.  Despite the recent decline in fatal heroin overdoses, the overall number of total drug deaths hasn't changed much year-over-year. Fentanyl, a drug 50 times strong than heroin, has been moving into the county at an alarming rate, slowing local agencies' progress in combatting the statewide overdose epidemic, authorities told NJ Advance Media. In 2012, the synthetic opioid accounted for only three deaths in the county and 42 statewide, according to data from New Jersey's Attorney General's Office. By the end of 2015, Middlesex had credited 30 of its 106 fatal overdoses to fentanyl.

Read more: http://www.nj.com/middlesex/index.ssf/2017/01/fentanyl_could_replace_heroin_as_leading_cause_in.html

Kansas City Star: Election board’s relocation delay costs county double rent

The Kansas City Star reports that when the county executive’s office announced last year that the St. Louis County Election Board headquarters would relocate to the refurbished Northwest Plaza, the timeline put the move after the November general election. January is now nearly gone, and election workers are preparing for the April municipal elections in the space the agency has occupied for better than two decades. The county, as a consequence, is on the hook for two monthly rent payments in excess of $119,000 through April — $58,000 at the Maplewood address and nearly $61,000 for 50,000 square feet where the election board will share space with two other county departments at the Crossings at Northwest, the site of the former Northwest Plaza. “We’re using taxpayer money, for crying out loud,” said Rick Stream, who began his term as the Republican elections director on Jan. 9. “We should be cognizant of that.” The election authority requested the delay to avoid a move that threatened to slow preparations for the April elections.

Read more: http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/metro/questions-resurface-as-st-louis-county-elections-office-postpones-move/article_dc02d37c-bd4f-5c9f-9193-5899e9e162f3.html

Boston Globe: Law firms profited from county treasurer’s ties 

The Boston Globe reports Plymouth County treasurer Thomas J. O’Brien is an unlikely magnet for campaign contributions from high-powered attorneys in Manhattan and downtown Boston. Yet, since 2007, lawyers from the Thornton Law Firm in Boston and Labaton Sucharow of New York City have given $100,000 to O’Brien’s political campaigns, accounting for almost half of all the donations he’s received over the decade. O’Brien’s popularity with the firms can be traced directly to the small retirement fund that, as county treasurer, he oversees. Fourteen times in the past decade, the Plymouth County retirement system has filed lawsuits on the advice of the lawyers from Labaton and Thornton, charging one corporation after another with misconduct that reduced the value of the retirement system’s investments. Court records show that the retirement fund has collected a grand total of $40,035 from all the lawsuits combined while the lawyers have received 1,000 times that amount: $41.4 million.

Read more: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/01/28/prim-and-proper-statehouse-leader-law-firm-profited-from-ties-public-retirement-funds/YKWbyFzQb6Li2VNTjbu18O/story.html

Baltimore Sun: Can police address violence and reform simultaneously

The Baltimore Sun reports that days into 2017, as Baltimore's historic spike in homicides stretched into a third calendar year, Mayor Catherine Pugh and Police Commissioner Kevin Davis announced the latest approach to violence. They would reassign 100 officers from mostly administrative posts to join street patrols. They did not say where they would find the officers. But according to transfer documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun, nearly half were members of the Police Department's Community Collaboration Division — the unit that was expanded after the unrest of 2015 to rebuild relations with the community. The reassignments slashed the unit by more than 80 percent. A week later, Pugh and Davis appeared again in the same ornate room in City Hall to announce the agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice to reform the department. Caught between crime and the consent decree, Baltimore must now disrupt historic levels of violence while remaking the culture of the Police Department.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/sun-investigates/bs-md-ci-crime-and-reform-20170128-story.html

Des Moines Register: Rising home values left behind some neighborhoods

The Des Moines Register reports home prices have reached record highs, and Polk County's median home value has climbed to nearly $150,000. A wave of new homebuyers has prompted fast-paced sales. Bidding wars have broken out for homes in popular neighborhoods, where prices have surged more than 10 percent since the housing crash in 2008. But Des Moines' housing surge has left behind thousands of homeowners in poorer neighborhoods that have seen their home values fall as much as 13 percent — even as the economy rebounded, The Des Moines Register's exclusive analysis of Polk County assessment data shows. The Register found that in the five Polk County census tracts where house values rose the most from 2011 to 2015, a typical home increased about $25,000. But in the five tracts where assessed values fell the most, a typical home dropped by more than $5,000. Declining home equity puts poorer homeowners at an even greater disadvantage and widens the wealth gap, affordable housing advocates say.

Read more: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/money/business/development/2017/01/28/widening-gap-how-dms-rising-home-values-left-behind-some-neighborhoods/96373234/

Indianapolis Star: Elusive funding for Pence’s bicentennial projects dogs state 

The Indianapolis Star reports Vice President Mike Pence has a new home in Washington, D.C., and an office in the White House, but back in Indiana, state officials are still scrambling to figure out how to pay for several bicentennial construction projects Pence initiated as governor without a solid financing plan. At issue are $53.5 million in new projects Pence sought as part of the state’s 200th birthday celebration last year. They included a new $2 million Bicentennial Plaza at the Indiana Statehouse, a $2.5 million education center at the neighboring State Library, a new $25 million state archives building and a $24 million inn at Potato Creek State Park in St. Joseph County. Skeptical lawmakers allowed Pence to spend taxpayer money on the projects as part of the state's 200th birthday celebration after he assured them he could pay for projects by leasing excess space on the Indiana's 340 state-owned cell towers. But two years after those assurances were made, a cell tower deal has yet to materialize.

Read more: http://www.indystar.com/story/news/politics/2017/01/29/elusive-funding-pences-bicentennial-projects-dogs-state/97056482/

Chicago Tribune: Bonds raised for gun crimes but suspects getting out faster

The Chicago Tribune reports that since Chicago's violence rate began to spike in 2012, Cook County judges have doubled the amount of bond set for people charged with felony gun crimes. If judges hoped the increase would keep armed gang members off the streets until their cases were decided, that did not happen. Despite increasingly high bonds, the opposite has happened — the same group of those charged with gun crimes is getting out of jail more than twice as fast as they were four years ago, according to a Tribune analysis of jail data of arrests and bonds. At the same time, the Chicago Police Department is making fewer gun arrests and recovering fewer guns. From 2012 through the end of last year, the number of guns recovered fell by 33 percent and the number of arrests dropped by nearly 9 percent overall despite a recent uptick, according to department figures.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-chicago-guns-cook-county-bonds-20170127-story.html

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: City blocks release of records in bribery probe

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports the administration of Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed has put a lock on public documents that could shed light on the bribery scandal enveloping City Hall — a move that First Amendment experts say stonewalls the public’s right to know about city operations, and could violate the state’s sunshine laws. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and Channel 2 Action News have been denied numerous requests for information about Elvin “E.R.” Mitchell Jr., a prominent Atlanta construction contractor who federal prosecutors say is the central figure in the million-dollar corruption scheme. The city’s law department has cited the on-going federal investigation as its reason for withholding the records, which include emails between city officials that mention Mitchell or his companies, and contracts awarded to his companies. Experts say the city’s position seems to conflict with the state’s sunshine law, which does not allow governments to withhold records from the public just because they may be related to an investigation.

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/local-govt--politics/atlanta-blocks-release-records-bribery-probe-city-officials/M7OWi4ysCg5YNZunhOJJuL/

Sun Sentinel: Bus driver in tragedy back behind wheel 

The Sun Sentinel reports a Broward County bus driver has been returned to his job, despite his bosses' conclusion that he broke safety laws, ignored horrified screams from bus passengers, and left a 14-year-old boy permanently injured. Reinaldo Soto, 59, drives a Broward County Transit bus on Powerline Road's Route 14, county transit officials said. He was removed from the job after the high-profile tragedy nearly four years ago. But records released to the Sun Sentinel this week reveal an arbitrator's decision to return him to the roads in 2014. The Soto case highlights a bus system criticized as being too forgiving to drivers involved in accidents. A Sun Sentinel investigation in December 2013 found that Broward County Transit repeatedly allowed drivers with troubled histories to remain on the roads. The county auditor also found serious flaws in driver discipline and the tracking of bus accidents.

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fl-bus-runs-over-teen-folo-20170127-story.html

New Haven Register: Connecticut sees rise in pedestrian deaths

The New Haven Register reports more than 50 people were reportedly killed last year in Connecticut as a result of a pedestrian-involved motor vehicle crash, the highest number of pedestrian fatalities related to motor vehicle accidents since 1995, according to the University of Connecticut’s Crash Data Repository. There were 1,402 pedestrian-involved motor vehicle crashes reported to the research center from local police departments last year, said Eric Jackson, director of the Connecticut Transportation Safety Research Center, which runs the crash data repository at UConn. Data is still being compiled and updated, Jackson said, but a search on the repository this week revealed that there were 54 pedestrian fatalities from motor vehicle crashes already reported for last year. Nationally, the numbers are high as well, based on information from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. While 2016 data is not yet available, the agency reported that in 2015 there were 5,376 pedestrian deaths nationwide as a result of motor vehicle crashes — the highest number of deaths since 1996.

Read more: http://www.nhregister.com/general-news/20170128/connecticut-sees-rise-in-pedestrian-deaths-new-haven-continues-to-work-on-traffic-calming

San Francisco Chronicle: Aid to homeless reveals extent of heroin use

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that Oakland leaders had ambitious goals three months ago when they sought to bring basic services and help to a squalid, needle-strewn homeless camp at 35th and Magnolia streets. The idea, they said, was to offer a humane alternative to sending in cleanup crews and clearing the 39 homeless people out. Instead, city employees hosed off the sidewalks, added portable toilets and trash bins, and provided counselors to help get the campers into housing. They installed concrete barricades to prevent the camp from growing and set a March 31 deadline to get everyone housed. Halfway through the effort, officials are finding out just how difficult it is to follow through with their bighearted intentions. And the city’s involvement has stirred controversy, with some neighbors applauding the efforts and others denouncing them.  Perhaps the most entrenched problem facing the city is that many of the homeless people at 35th and Magnolia streets are addicted to heroin.

Read more: http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/Oakland-s-aid-to-homeless-camps-reveals-extent-10891626.php

New York Times: Troops who cleaned up radioactive islands can’t get care

The New York Times reports roughly 4,000 troops helped clean up fallout from dozens of nuclear tests on the ring of coral islands known as Enewetak Atoll in the middle of the Pacific Ocean between 1977 and 1980. Hundreds say they are now plagued by health problems, including brittle bones, cancer and birth defects in their children. Many are already dead. Others are too sick to work. The military says there is no connection between these illnesses and the cleanup. Radiation exposure during the work fell well below recommended thresholds, it says, and safety precautions were top notch. So the government refuses to pay for the veterans’ medical care. Congress long ago recognized that troops were harmed by radiation on Enewetak during the original atomic tests, which occurred in the 1950s, and should be cared for and compensated. Still, it has failed to do the same for the men who cleaned up the toxic debris 20 years later.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/28/us/troops-radioactive-islands-medical-care.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=second-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

Seattle Times: Washington’s 30-year earthquake drill for the “Big One”

The Seattle Times reports Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee has ordered a new report on seismic danger, adding to a paper trail of recommendations that have largely been ignored for decades. On Jan. 17, Inslee strode into an auditorium in Olympia with a message for the new subcabinet he formed to help prepare the state for a catastrophic earthquake and tsunami. “The science is clear that we have in our future a megaquake,” Inslee said. “The establishment of the subcabinet is our attempt to marshal the resources of the state to have a coordinated resilience plan.”

But the governor’s rhetoric gave way to some familiar realities in Washington state. The subcabinet has no budget, staff or regulatory authority — and simply creating it took more than three years, internal records show. The dozen state officials assembled onstage were on loan from their day jobs. And the members are responsible for delivering just one product: a draft of their findings by July.

Read more: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/northwest/washington-30-year-earthquake-drill-for-big-one-order-studies-ignore-them-repeat/

Tennessean: The power of the lobbyist

The Tennessean reports it's no surprise that in Tennessee politics, some companies use lobbyists and the power of the purse to have legislative sway. A Tennessean analysis of lobbyist compensation, expenses, campaign expenditures and legislative registration in recent years shows millions of dollars spent by hundreds of organizations every year to become power players at the statehouse. Lobbyists routinely meet with legislators, create client strategies and often write the actual language in a bill on behalf of a lawmaker. A winning strategy doesn't always mean passing a new law. Many times a win means killing legislation or orchestrating a public campaign to educate key lawmakers. Some say this gives a handful of people too much influence on Capitol Hill. Lobbyists, however, say they merely represent the interests of a broad swath of constituents and do much more than try to win for their client.

Read more: http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/politics/2017/01/28/analysis-power-tennessee-lobbyists/96951312/

Philadelphia Inquirer: Region has hundreds of problem bridges.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports the Delaware River Bridge was not one inspectors thought they had to worry about.  The steel-truss bridge was in fact undergoing a $61 million upgrade. Evaluated in 2014 on its three key components -- deck, substructure, and superstructure -- the 60-year-old bridge got passing marks in all three.  Yet last week a worker on a painting crew happened to spot, by chance, something so alarming, authorities rushed to close the bridge to the 42,000 cars that cross it each day: a beam beneath the bridge’s deck split in two.  "It was absolutely amazing to see a crack like this," said Henry Berman, chief PennDot engineer for the district. The 1.2-mile bridge remains closed and, if inspected today, would be labeled "structurally deficient," a designation that describes nearly one in five bridges in Pennsylvania, the second-worst ranking in the country. An Inquirer analysis of federal and state transportation data identified the 30 poorest-rated bridges in the Philadelphia area that are heavily traveled and also designated as “structurally deficient.”

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/business/transportation/delaware-river-bridge-closure-infrastructure-region.html

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Jan. 26, 2017

Toledo Blade: University athletics audit chronicles disarray

The Toledo Blade reports an internal audit of the University of Toledo’s department of athletics found thousands of dollars in discrepancies, improper cash handling, irregular and incomplete record keeping, missing funds, and no oversight from the head of the department. The audit, obtained by The Blade through a public records request, led UT to fire Anthony Zaworski, the associate director of athletics for finance, in October. Dated Aug. 25, 2016, the audit concluded that Mr. Zaworski had unchecked control over the athletic department’s money as well as funds from the university’s Rocky’s Locker merchandise stores, which has locations at Savage Arena and Franklin Park Mall. The report showed a minimum of $9,083 was missing in the fiscal year 2016. The university said a deeper review dating back to 2013 revealed a discrepancy of “approximately $12,000.” The missing funds have not been recovered, UT said.

Read more: http://www.bcsn.tv/news_article/show/748401

Northwest Indiana Times: Why do so many babies die in Indiana?

The Northwest Indiana Times reports that in 2013, the Indiana State Department of Health declared that reducing infant deaths would be its top priority. The Indiana Legislature has since allocated more than $17 million to fight infant mortality. That money has gone toward grants to nonprofits, the development of a mobile app for pregnant women and a marketing campaign that focused on safe sleep practices and the importance of prenatal care. Despite these efforts, Indiana's infant death rate per 1,000 live births actually rose to 7.3 in 2015 from 7.1 in 2013. The health department contends that the rate is down from 7.7 in 2011, and its work has helped reduce the African-American infant death rate, the percentage of women who smoke during pregnancy and the number of preterm births, said spokeswoman Jennifer O'Malley. Babies die for any number of complex reasons. Many were delivered prematurely or low weight. Poverty, stress, nutrition, pollution and access to health care can all be contributing factors.

Read more: http://www.nwitimes.com/news/special-section/infant-mortality/introduction/

Arizona Republic: Why are children taken by the state? Often, no one knows

When Arizona workers refused to let Maribel Ontiveros see her son Christopher at the hospital, then came to her house three days later at 3:30 in the morning to take away her other two children, she kept asking what seemed a simple question: Why?
More than a year later, she’s still asking. Over the past decade, only tiny Wyoming and West Virginia may have removed children at a higher rate than Arizona. Arizona has seen easily the steepest increase of any state in how many kids it removes from their families. Since 2005, as the number of children in the foster-care system declined in most states, it climbed in Arizona, nearly tripling to peak at more than 19,000 children at the end of February. That surge overwhelmed the Department of Economic Security’s Child Protective Services division. By late 2013, CPS faced a still-rising backlog of more than 14,000 inactive, uninvestigated reports of child abuse or neglect.

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2017/01/22/arizona-department-child-safety-why-kids-taken-away-too-often-answer-unknown/96539080/

Sun Sentinel: Co-workers: “Officer should have worn police vest to ID himself”

The Sun Sentinel reports that before shooting stranded motorist Corey Jones in 2015, then-Officer Nouman Raja failed to do something that his fellow officers say is a requirement to avoid confusion on late-night, plainclothes patrols. When Raja — wearing jeans, a T-shirt and a ball cap — approached Jones' broken-down SUV, he left behind a police vest intended to show the public that he was a police officer emerging from the unmarked van used for surveillance. The encounter left Jones, 31, dead and Raja facing charges of culpable negligence and attempted first-degree murder. Newly released records reveal more details about Raja's actions that night as well as the practices of the police department that sent him on patrol wearing plain clothes and driving a white cargo van. That is raising more questions, from Jones' family and law enforcement experts alike, about Raja's tactics that night, as well as the way the police department used its unmarked patrols.

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/palm-beach/fl-nouman-raja-folo-20170121-story.html

Miami Herald: This prison is by far the deadliest in Florida

The Miami Herald reports that three years after Dade Correctional Institution was thrust into the national spotlight for the death of an inmate locked in a boiling shower in its mental health unit, deaths at the prison have soared to unprecedented heights. In 2016, 13 inmates died at Dade Correctional, including four from hanging. That’s twice as many deaths as any other state prison, with the exception of Charlotte Correctional (which tallied 7) and prison hospitals and compounds catering to the sick or elderly. Three of those who apparently killed themselves were 30 or younger, two of them men with mental illnesses. Another inmate was killed by his cellmate and seven died of various medical ailments, ranging from heart disease to lymphoma. They are among the record number of inmates who died in Florida state prisons in 2016.

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/special-reports/florida-prisons/article127340579.html#storylink=cpy

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Georgia argues its laws immune from challenges

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports Georgia’s legislators may pass any law they wish — a ban on interracial marriage, for example, or a law against gun ownership, or a prohibition against Christians holding office — and no one may challenge them in any state court. The state Attorney General’s Office is taking that surprising argument before the Georgia Supreme Court in a hearing on the state’s “fetal pain” law. Citizens, the attorney general says, may challenge such laws in state court only if the Legislature has specifically granted them permission to do so. The dispute over the controversial “fetal pain” statute which bans almost all abortions after 20 weeks has implications far beyond abortion law and could result in one of the most consequential decisions by the state’s highest court in decades. At issue is the doctrine of sovereign immunity, rooted in the centuries-old English principle that “the king can do no wrong.”

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/local/state-contends-its-laws-are-immune-court-challenges/awczOs3lh7m11AJcGIpE2H/

Honolulu Star Advertiser: Prison officials seek $1 million for fruitless master plan

The Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports that more than 13 years ago, the state mapped out an ambitious 10-year plan for the Hawaii prison system that included almost $1 billion in construction. That master plan called for new jails on Oahu, Maui, Kauai and in Kona, and a major expansion of the state’s largest prison at Halawa. None of those major prison or jail projects ever happened. The official “10-Year Corrections Master Plan Update” was never implemented, and this year prison officials are back at the state legislature asking lawmakers for $1 million to update the 2003 plan. Despite chronic overcrowding in the correctional system, the state hasn’t built and opened a new prison or jail in Hawaii since 1987, although prison officials have spent tens of millions trying.    

Read more: http://www.staradvertiser.com/2017/01/22/hawaii-news/corrections-officials-seek-1m-to-update-fruitless-master-plan/

Maine Sunday Telegram: Maine’s rural hospitals dread repeal of Obamacare

The Maine Sunday Telegram reports that love it or hate it, the Affordable Care Act has helped Maine’s hospitals stay solvent, and experts fear its repeal could make it hard for some of them to avoid cutbacks and even closure. President Trump and the Republican-controlled Congress have vowed to repeal the law, also known as Obamacare, but it’s unclear whether they will replace it with a viable and comparable alternative. Maine’s senior U.S. senator, Susan Collins, will reintroduce an alternative plan she co-sponsored in 2015 that would allow states to opt for other solutions, but its prospects are unclear. Absent a comparable alternative, an ACA repeal would leave 80,000 Mainers who receive health insurance through its exchange without coverage. Some would presumably find alternate coverage, but tens of thousands would not be able to afford it, meaning big losses for Maine’s hospitals and clinics, which are obligated by state law to provide “medically necessary” care to those unable to pay.

Read more: http://www.pressherald.com/2017/01/22/maines-rural-hospitals-fear-crisis-if-obamacare-is-repealed-without-comparable-replacement/

Baltimore Sun: Casinos pump out millions for schools, so why budget deficits?

The Baltimore Sun reports that in the seven years since the first of Maryland's six casinos opened, they have pumped $1.7 billion into the state's Education Trust Fund — the financial windfall that advocates for gambling promised would go to the state's public schools. But over that time, state funding for public schools has increased by less than half that amount — and some jurisdictions, including Baltimore, have suffered funding cuts. That's because the state officials who approved casino gambling in 2008 — Gov. Martin O'Malley and his Democratic allies in the General Assembly — didn't require that school aid keep pace with the growth in gambling. State budget analysts say the money from the casino-fueled Education Trust Fund is, in fact, going to schools. But that stream has allowed the governor and lawmakers to take money that once went to schools and redirect it to pay salaries, fund roadwork and support other government programs and services.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/bs-md-casino-education-20170121-story.html

Baltimore Sun: Shootings by police languish on prosecutors’ desks

The Baltimore Sun reports that within hours after a fatal police shooting during an armed robbery nine months ago police brass were commending the detective for doing "the absolute right thing." Surveillance cameras captured him holding a gun at his side. Nine months later, the case remains under review by the Baltimore state's attorney's office. The detective has been neither cleared nor charged in the shooting, leaving both the detective and the family of 44-year-old Robert Jerome Howard in limbo. The experience is common: Eleven out of the 17 police shootings in Baltimore during the past 16 months languish with prosecutors. That's in sharp contrast to the case against the officers in the April 2015 arrest and death of Freddie Gray, when State's Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby decided to bring charges within weeks, and in shootings among civilians, when prosecutors typically are quick to make such a determination.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/topic/crime-law-justice/crime/theft/02001003-topic.html

Kansas City Star: Child deaths in Kansas shrouded by secrecy

The Kansas City Star reports dozens of Kansas children have died of abuse and neglect over the years, others have been seriously injured, and many were already known to social workers. Yet, in most cases, the public still doesn’t know what — if anything — the Kansas Department for Children and Families did or could have done to protect the children, or whether the department took any steps after a tragedy to improve the system. The Kansas Legislature in 2004 passed a disclosure law meant to provide transparency after a child’s death or serious injury. But a Kansas City Star investigation has found that the law is largely ineffective, allowing the department to operate in a cloud of secrecy. “The law is there to protect children,” said Rep. Jim Ward, a Wichita Democrat and attorney who has worked in family court. “But the current DCF administration is using it as a shield right now to prevent people from investigating or shining the light on what’s going on there.

Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/news/politics-government/article128058569.html#storylink=cpy

American-Statesman: Doubts raised as early as 2009 about Austin’s DNA lab

The American-Statesman reports that long before the Austin Police Department’s DNA crime lab was shuttered, prosecutors and defense lawyers were second-guessing its work. In 2009, prosecutors raised red flags about DNA results in a rape case, later dismissed the charges against the suspect and eventually hired two private labs to double check the department’s results before re-filing them. In 2015, a rape suspect’s trial expert said the lab’s results were so riddled with corrections and bad math that the defense should order new tests. And in early 2016, prosecutors hired an expert to review 17 criminal cases for potential problems. That expert found mistakes in all of them. Multiple cases identified by the American-Statesman through court records provide insight into how problems are beginning to play out — including suspicion of the wrong person in a sexual assault case — and provide a hint at what the future may hold in the Travis County criminal justice system.

Read more: http://www.statesman.com/news/lawyers-raised-doubts-about-austin-dna-lab-work-early-2009/3XPHeUDcTLYMWt9DGu7LGN/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Jan. 17, 2017

AP: Lie detectors trip applicants at border agency

The Associated Press reported that two out of three applicants to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection fail its polygraph, according to the agency — more than double the average rate of eight law enforcement agencies that provided data to The Associated Press under open-records requests. It's a big reason approximately 2,000 jobs at the nation's largest law enforcement agency are empty, with the Border Patrol, a part of CBP, recently slipping below 20,000 agents for the first time since 2009. And it has raised questions of whether the lie detector tests are being properly administered. CBP Commissioner Gil Kerlikowske said the failure rate is too high, but that it's largely because the agency hasn't attracted the applicants it wants. He and other law enforcement experts contend the polygraphs are generally working as intended at the agency, which has been trying to root out bribery and other corruption.

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/national/ap-exclusive-lie-detectors-trip-applicants-at-border-agency/article_a9875d31-aa35-5f72-a731-0d8b6f12975a.html

Los Angeles Times: California bullet train hurtling towards huge cost overrun

The Los Angeles Times reports California’s bullet train could cost taxpayers 50 percent more than estimated — as much as $3.6 billion more. And that’s just for the first 118 miles through the Central Valley, which was supposed to be the easiest part of the route between Los Angeles and San Francisco. A confidential Federal Railroad Administration risk analysis, obtained by The Times, projects that building bridges, viaducts, trenches and track from Merced to Shafter, just north of Bakersfield,  could cost $9.5 billion to $10 billion, compared with the original budget of $6.4 billion. The federal document outlines far-reaching management problems: significant delays in environmental planning, lags in processing invoices for federal grants and continuing failures to acquire needed property. The California High-Speed Rail Authority originally anticipated completing the Central Valley track by this year, but the federal risk analysis estimates that that won’t happen until 2024, placing the project seven years behind schedule.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-bullet-cost-overruns-20170106-story.html

Washington Post: Tiny ethics office takes on Trump’s business ties

The Washington Post reports President-elect Donald Trump’s refusal to divest from his global business empire has provoked a showdown in Washington over government ethics, pitting a small federal agency tasked with preventing conflicts of interest against the incoming administration and its Republican allies on Capitol Hill. The dispute erupted Friday, Jan. 13, after a top House Republican demanded to question the director of the independent Office of Government Ethics, who took the unusual step this week of denouncing Trump for retaining ownership of his businesses while transferring management to his sons. With Republicans and Democrats weighing in, the episode has brought unprecedented attention to a usually obscure office and its director, Walter Shaub Jr., who became an instant sensation on Twitter and in news headlines this week. He blasted Trump’s plan as “meaningless” and said the president-elect is not meeting the standards set by “the best of his nominees.”

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/powerpost/trumps-business-ties-prompt-a-showdown-between-a-tiny-ethics-office-and-the-gop/2017/01/13/0dc1b500-d9c8-11e6-b8b2-cb5164beba6b_story.html?utm_term=.ec251c628ef2

Boston Globe: Climate change is biggest threat to Trump’s Mar-a-Lago

The Boston Globe reports that few places are as vulnerable to the rising seas as this tony barrier island, a narrow, 16-mile strip of sprawling estates and pampered gardens between the Atlantic Ocean and Lake Worth. The advancing ocean has already cost residents here millions of dollars, and will probably exact a far greater toll in the years to come, town officials say. An overwhelming majority of scientists attribute sea level rise to climate change, and they warn that the oceans could rise substantially in the coming decades. Yet the most influential of the island’s 8,100 residents — President-elect Donald Trump — has dismissed the threat of global warming, calling it “a hoax.” Around Mar-a-Lago, Trump’s opulent estate here, rising sea levels are largely seen as a present danger, not a distant risk.

Read more: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/01/13/rising-seas-threaten-jewel-trump-real-estate-empire/bsleB73TesDoLcVxJBK9LP/story.html

Star Tribune; Food stamp enrollment swells among elderly Minnesotans

The Star Tribune reports the U.S. food-stamp program, created five decades ago to stave off hunger among impoverished families, is undergoing a remarkable resurgence among a generation of older Minnesotans. Squeezed by rising living costs and depleted retirement funds, people who are 65 and older now represent the fastest-growing segment of food stamp recipients in Minnesota. Their numbers have nearly doubled since the Great Recession ended in 2009, forcing the state to explore new ways to reach an often isolated population of seniors. Once derided as “welfare,” food stamps no longer carry the same stigma, particularly among the growing numbers of baby boomers entering retirement. The benefit has become so popular that, in some Twin Cities senior complexes, it is almost as ubiquitous as Social Security and Medicare benefits, social workers say.

Read more: http://www.startribune.com/food-stamp-enrollment-swells-among-elderly-minnesotans/410735335/

New York Times: Trump’s E.P.A. pick backed industry donors over regulators

The New York Times reports a legal fight to clean up tons of chicken manure fouling the waters of Oklahoma’s bucolic northeastern corner — much of it from neighboring Arkansas — was in full swing six years ago when the conservative lawyer Scott Pruitt took office as Oklahoma’s attorney general. His response: Put on the brakes. Rather than push for a federal judge to punish the companies by extracting perhaps tens of millions of dollars in damages, Oklahoma’s new chief law enforcement officer quietly negotiated a deal to simply study the problem further. The move came after he had taken tens of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from executives and lawyers for the poultry industry. It was one of a series of instances in which Mr. Pruitt put cooperation with industry before confrontation as he sought to blunt the impact of federal environmental policies in his state — against oil, gas, agriculture and other interests.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/14/us/scott-pruitt-trump-epa-pick.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=first-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

Columbus Dispatch: Narcotic pain pills still plentiful in Ohio

The Columbus Dispatch reports heroin and fentanyl grab the headlines, but narcotic painkillers still fill Ohio medicine cabinets. Drug-overdose deaths in Ohio continue to soar, with the 2016 toll expected to far exceed the record 3,050 in 2015. Increasingly, heroin and fentanyl are responsible for overdose deaths. But narcotic pain pills such as OxyContin continue to be a problem. Records show that many Ohioans get dozens of pills a year. Significantly, that’s usually the starting point for people who later become addicted to heroin and other hard drugs. Almost no one goes directly to heroin, experts say. The Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System, the computer system that tracks how drugs are prescribed and dispensed, shows that 2.6 million people received 11.2 million prescriptions for opioid pills in 2015, the last full year for which statistics are available. There were 684.2 million pills dispensed in 2015, an 11.3 percent drop from 2010.

Read more: http://workplace.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2017/01/15/addictive-narcotic-pain-pills-still-plentiful-in-ohio.html

Austin American-Statesman: Texas A-F grades give boost to charter schools

The Austin American-Statesman reports critics of the new A-F grading system for Texas schools have long warned that the state’s letter grades would give an undeserved boost to charter schools. An American-Statesman analysis of the advisory A-F grades issued this month shows that charter schools did fare better compared with their traditional public school peers under the letter grade system than they did under the state’s old ratings. The advisory grades show how schools and districts would have performed for the 2015-16 school year if the A-F rating system already had been in place. Under the existing accountability system, charter schools that year were slightly more likely to have at least one failing mark than traditional public schools. But traditional schools — not charters — were more likely to fail under the new letter grades, even though data from the same year were used to calculate them, the Statesman analysis shows.

Read more: http://www.statesman.com/news/local/statesman-analysis-texas-school-grades-give-boost-charters/jwBq7PbNX3vzksOcH3HvDM/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Jan. 12, 2017

AP: Trump has taken few steps to disentangle from private empire

The Associated Press reported that while President-elect Donald Trump pledged to step away from his family-owned international real estate development, property management and licensing business before taking office Jan. 20, with less than two weeks until his inauguration, he hasn't stepped very far. Trump has canceled a handful of international deals and dissolved a few shell companies created for prospective investments. Still, he continues to own or control some 500 companies that make up the Trump Organization, creating a tangle of potential conflicts of interest without precedent in modern U.S. history. The president-elect is expected to give an update on his effort to distance himself from his business at a Wednesday, Jan. 11, news conference. He told The Associated Press on Friday, Jan. 6, that he would be announcing a "very simple solution." Ethics experts have called for Trump to sell off his assets and place his investments in a blind trust, which means something his family would not control. That's what previous presidents have done.

Read more: http://bigstory.ap.org/article/bdd6cc9566a648e0b4d49c6d8808cccd/trump-has-taken-few-steps-disentangle-private-empire

Oregonian: “Escaped” GMO grass defies eradication, divides seed industry

The Oregonian reports that after more than a decade of unsuccessful efforts to eradicate the genetically modified grass it created and allowed to escape, lawn and garden giant Scotts Miracle-Gro now wants to step back and shift the burden to Oregonians. The federal government is poised to allow that to happen by relinquishing its oversight, even as an unlikely coalition of farmers, seed dealers, environmentalists, scientists and regulators cry foul. The altered grass has taken root in Oregon, of all places, the self-professed grass seed capital of the world with a billion-dollar-a-year industry at stake. The grass has proven hard to kill because it's been modified to be resistant to Roundup, the ubiquitous, all-purpose herbicide. The situation is particularly tense in Malheur County, where Scotts' altered grass has taken root after somehow jumping the Snake River from test beds in Idaho.

Read more: http://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2017/01/grass_seed_industry_fearful_ab.html#incart_target2box_default_#incart_target2box_targeted_

Des Moines Register: Penny sales tax funds athletic, extra school projects

The Des Moines Register reported that a rural school district in northern Iowa opened a $3.1 million gym in December complete with indoor track, weight room, treadmills and elliptical machines. Plans call for adding televisions and weekend yoga classes. West Fork Schools hired a full-time attendant to oversee gym memberships, which families can purchase for $300 a year, and classes such as Zumba and aerobics. During school hours, it's closed to the public. The project was largely paid for with revenue generated by a statewide penny sales tax originally intended to finance school infrastructure upgrades such as replacing aging roofs and windows. It's among dozens of athletic or extracurricular spending projects The Des Moines Register found after surveying more than 50 of Iowa's 333 school districts. The sample represented various sizes and geographies, and asked how the schools spent tax revenue.

Read more: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/education/2017/01/06/survey-penny-sales-tax-funds-athletic-extra-school-projects/95488686/

Louisville Courier-Journal: Child abuse findings voided secretly in Kentucky

The Louisville Courier-Journal reports that after grabbing the teenage girl from behind, Kevin Watson, a security monitor for Jefferson County Public Schools, slammed her head to the table, opening a gash that splashed blood on the girl's clothes, the table and the floor, according to accounts of witnesses at Breckinridge Metropolitan High School. Yet, despite a state Child Protective Services investigation that substantiated the incident as child abuse, Watson has a clean record with the state Cabinet for Health and Family Services. Using a secret process, Watson, exercising his right to a confidential appeal, was able to overturn the cabinet's child abuse finding against him. That kept his name from being added to an official list — also confidential — known as the state Child Abuse and Neglect Registry that can restrict adults from some occupations or activities, such as child care, working or volunteering with youths or serving as foster parents. And data obtained from the cabinet by the Courier-Journal show Watson's case is not unique.

Read more: http://www.courier-journal.com/story/news/politics/2017/01/07/child-abuse-findings-voided-secretly-kentucky/95925102/

Times Picayune: Children of incarcerated parents are forgotten victims

The Times Picayune reports that thousands of children in Louisiana, although they have done no wrong and committed no crimes, are being punished for their parents' mistakes. They are the hidden casualties of the state's world-leading mass incarceration rate, and, beginning Monday, Jan. 9, The Times-Picayune plans to explore the damage done to children when a parent is sent to prison. The multi-part series exposes how law enforcement and the courts don't always recognize that the people they arrest, prosecute and sentence are more than just suspects: often they are mothers and fathers. And their imprisonment will affect children, households and entire communities. The series will show how parents charged with nonviolent offenses are held for months -- sometimes years -- as they await trial simply because they are too poor to pay bail and how this practice can leave children teetering on the edge of homelessness or falling into the foster care system.


Read more: http://www.nola.com/crime/index.ssf/2017/01/parental_incarceration_family.html

Austin American-Statesman: Bad grades, hiring practices doom lab leader

The Austin American-Statesman reports that when Austin police embarked on hiring a new chief forensics officer a few months ago, officials said they wanted a top-flight scientist to resurrect their shuttered DNA lab and restore confidence in its work. Their pick was Scott Milne, who has worked in both law enforcement and private forensics labs in Arizona and Colorado, for the $111,000 position. Today, Milne is being paid to stay home. No one — not human resources staff, not an interview panel, not department brass — noticed or flagged a less-than-stellar college transcript Milne gave them with his application. Had they, they would have seen that Milne’s academic history was pockmarked with failing grades, including many courses directly related to his career, according to records obtained by the American-Statesman.

Read more: http://www.statesman.com/news/bad-grades-lapses-hiring-process-doomed-austin-crime-lab-leader/gvLo3UwqnxAV60et7RpOiM/

New York Times: Kushner, Trump in-law and adviser, chases a Chinese deal

The New York Times reports that on the night of Nov. 16, a group of executives gathered in a private dining room of the restaurant La Chine at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in Midtown Manhattan. The table was laden with Chinese delicacies and $2,100 bottles of Château Lafite Rothschild. At one end sat Wu Xiaohui, the chairman of the Waldorf’s owner, Anbang Insurance Group, a Chinese financial behemoth with estimated assets of $285 billion and an ownership structure shrouded in mystery. Close by sat Jared Kushner, a major New York real estate investor whose father-in-law, Donald J. Trump, had just been elected president of the United States. Since the election, intense scrutiny has been trained on Mr. Trump’s company and the potential conflicts of interest he will face. But with Mr. Kushner laying the groundwork for his own White House role, the meeting at the Waldorf shines a light on his family’s multibillion-dollar business, Kushner Companies, and on the ethical thicket he would have to navigate while advising his father-in-law on policy that could affect his bottom line.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/07/us/politics/jared-kushner-trump-business.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=first-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

Arizona Republic: Pattern of political donations raises concerns

The Arizona Republic reports that most top campaign donors in Phoenix city elections are well-known figures — developers, sports team owners and political consultants. But one major donor is a mystery to many candidates who benefited from the thousands of dollars he gave over the past five years: Bishop Monty Moody. He leads a church in a building behind his Peoria home. Moody, his family and associates have become one of the largest sources of individual contributions to candidates running for office in Phoenix. A review of public records shows little obvious interest in Phoenix politics for Moody save one thing: his longstanding and close relationship with political consultant Joe Villasenor, a former city staffer who works with developers that have business at City Hall. Contributors tied to the church gave another nearly $8,000 in Glendale, where Villasenor has done work.

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/phoenix/2017/01/08/phoenix-campaign-donors-peoria-church-monty-moody/93974820/

Seattle Times: How Washington state education system hurts poor schools

The Seattle Times reports that this year’s legislative session in Olympia will be an 11th-hour culmination of the puzzle handed down to lawmakers by Washington state’s highest court, which said in an 2012 decision that Washington chronically underfunds public schools. By 2018, the court ruled, legislators need to find billions of new dollars for education. Many onlookers see this moment as an unusual opportunity not only to increase overall investment in schools, but also to shift the way Washington allocates education funding. Simply injecting more money into a system that distributes it haphazardly, or inequitably, they point out, could deepen imbalances that already exist.. Without a new model, resolving the McCleary school-funding lawsuit may answer the court’s mandate, but not the question of what to do about hundreds of thousands of kids who start out behind and remain there.

Read more: http://www.seattletimes.com/education-lab/stealth-inequities-how-washington-education-system-hurts-poor-schools/

New York Times: Confirmation hearings begin without all background checks

The New York Times reports that as Senate Republicans embark on a flurry of confirmation hearings this week, several of Donald J. Trump’s appointees have yet to complete the background checks and ethics clearances customarily required before the Senate begins to consider cabinet-level nominees. Republicans, who are expected to hold up to five hearings on Wednesday, Jan. 11, alone, say they simply want to ensure that the new president has a team in place as soon as possible. “I believe all the president-elect’s cabinet appointments will be confirmed,” Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, said. But Democrats are calling for the process to be slowed and for the hearings to be spread out. That, they say, would allow more time to vet the nominees. “Our first overarching focus is getting tax returns and ethics forms,” said Senator Amy Klobuchar, Democrat of Minnesota.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/07/us/politics/senate-confirmation-hearings-background-checks.html?_r=0

San Francisco Chronicle: Emergency dispatchers fall behind

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that national guidelines say that 90 percent of 911 calls should be answered within 10 seconds, a standard San Francisco has not met since early 2012. The state standard says 95 percent of calls should be picked up within 15 seconds. At San Francisco’s 911 call center — where hiring freezes have left staffing short and emergency call volume has surged — only about 79 percent of the 1.27 million emergency calls received in 2015, the latest year for which data are available, were answered within the 10-second standard, a Chronicle analysis shows. Nonemergency calls trended lower, with an average of 57 percent of calls answered within the recommended one-minute mark. The number of calls to San Francisco’s call center jumped from 919,908 in 2007 to 1.26 million in 2015, paralleling a swell in the city’s population.

Read more: http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/Every-second-counts-SF-emergency-dispatchers-10839076.php

Los Angeles Times: Pay raise comes with loss of cheap childcare for some

The Los Angeles Times reports hen the minimum wage in California rose to $10.50 an hour Jan. 1, more than a million people got a raise. But for an untold number of families across the state, that pay bump could price them out of child care. It’s an unintended consequence that was never part of the plan,” says Rich Winefield, the former executive director of Bananas, a day-care and preschool referral agency in Oakland. “It’s unbelievable that we have policy that creates this.” This year, for the first time, two parents working full time at minimum-wage jobs, with one child, will be considered too well off to qualify for state subsidies for day care and preschool. It’s been 10 years since the state set the threshold for who is poor enough to get the benefit, which is pegged to 2005 income levels. That’s just one of the likely ripple effects a rising wage will have for California businesses, their employees and their customers.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-minimum-wage-childcare-20170106-story.html

Washington Post: Makers of gun silencers want restrictions lifted

The Washington Post reports the federal government has strictly limited the sale of firearm silencers for as long as James Bond and big-screen gangsters have used them to discreetly shoot enemies between the eyes. Now the gun industry, which for decades has complained about the restrictions, is pursuing new legislation to make silencers easier to buy, and a key backer is Donald Trump Jr., an avid hunter and the oldest son of the president-elect, who campaigned as a friend of the gun industry.

They hope to position the bill not as a Second Amendment issue, but as a public-health effort to safeguard the eardrums of the nation’s 55 million gun owners. They even named it the Hearing Protection Act. It would end treating silencers as the same category as machine guns and grenades, thus eliminating a $200 tax and a nine-month approval process.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/gun-silencers-are-hard-to-buy-donald-trump-jr-and-silencer-makers-want-to-change-that/2017/01/07/0764ab4c-d2d2-11e6-9cb0-54ab630851e8_story.html?utm_term=.0e640920daaa

Dallas Morning News: Child abuse deaths on rise despite governor’s efforts

The Dallas Morning News reports that shortly after Gov. Greg Abbott took office in 2015, he promised to overhaul the state’s child welfare system and made an ambitious goal: no more child deaths. To that end, Abbott placed the Department of Family and Protective Services under his thumb. But despite Abbott’s heavy hand, Child Protective Services has been in a state of perpetual crisis under his watch and, by nearly every metric, has gotten worse at protecting children. Data obtained through an open records request shows that more Texas children died of abuse and neglect since the governor's office began applying pressure on the agency to improve last year. In fiscal year 2016, at least 202 Texas children died because of maltreatment, compared with 173 the year before. That toll will probably rise as the state reviews 123 more fatalities.

Read more: http://www.dallasnews.com/news/child-protective-services/2016/12/22/child-abuse-deaths-rose-cps-crisis-worsened-despite-gov-greg-abbotts-pressure-reform-broken-system

Atlanta Journal-Constitution:  Convicted kingpin left trail of blighted houses

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports Elgin DeMarco Jordan may have been dealing cocaine and heroin, but he was an Atlanta businessman just the same. And when the suspected head of a major area drug-trafficking organization had money to spare, he did just what amateur investors, venture capitalists and other businessmen tend to do in Atlanta nowadays. He snapped up blighted, cut-rate real estate in the city’s struggling Westside neighborhoods, looking to cash in on the intown boom. “I got so many properties, I can’t think sometimes,” Jordan, 42, told an undercover agent, a federal court filing states. Owners in Atlanta’s blighted neighborhoods often remain hidden behind shell companies and non-existent addresses, but Jordan’s criminal prosecution for drug dealing lifts the veil on how a single owner can impact a community.

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/local/convicted-kingpin-left-trail-blighted-houses-atlanta-westside/ArwM4rXz57COvNdVhXbCmO/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK

Arizona Daily Star: Penalties for workplace safety violations cut in Arizona

The Arizona Daily Star reports Phoenix roofers labored 20 feet above the ground without guardrails or fall-protection gear. In Tempe, workers were exposed to hazardous chemicals, including chlorine gas, without an adequate safety plan. An untrained Mesa worker was injured using a machine that didn’t guard human limbs from moving parts. After all three workplace safety violations this year, officials from the cited businesses showed up at an Industrial Commission of Arizona meeting, asked for a reduction in the penalties proposed by occupational safety inspectors — and got it. Now, federal officials are scrutinizing the unusual practices of the governor-appointed commission. In Arizona, civil penalties imposed for hazardous working conditions aren’t only subject to reductions during settlement conferences or formal appeals with employers. Unlike in all other states, penalties here can also undergo an early round of cuts that are largely unaccounted for because they happen before the penalties are even issued

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/local/penalties-for-workplace-safety-violations-get-extra-cuts-in-arizona/article_ff2970a8-0220-50d6-8cd3-90de46c7d944.html

Los Angeles Times: OxyContin goes global and is “just getting started”

The Los Angeles Times, exploring the role of OxyContin in the nation’s opioid epidemic, reports the drug is a dying business in America. With the nation in the grip of an opioid epidemic that has claimed more than 200,000 lives, the U.S. medical establishment is turning away from painkillers. Top health officials are discouraging primary care doctors from prescribing them for chronic pain, saying there is no proof they work long-term and substantial evidence they put patients at risk. Prescriptions for OxyContin have fallen nearly 40 percent since 2010, meaning billions in lost revenue for its Connecticut manufacturer, Purdue Pharma. So the company’s owners, the Sackler family, are pursuing a new strategy: A network of international companies owned by the family is moving rapidly into Latin America, Asia, the Middle East, Africa and other regions, and pushing for broad use of painkillers in places ill-prepared to deal with the ravages of opioid abuse and addiction.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-me-oxycontin-part3/

Chicago Tribune: Pharmacies miss half of dangerous drug combinations

The Chicago Tribune , in the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind, tested 255 pharmacies to see how often stores would dispense dangerous drug pairs without warning patients. Fifty-two percent of the pharmacies sold the medications without mentioning the potential interaction, striking evidence of an industry wide failure that places millions of consumers at risk. CVS, the nation's largest pharmacy retailer by store count, had the highest failure rate of any chain in the Tribune tests, dispensing the medications with no warning 63 percent of the time. Walgreens, one of CVS' main competitors, had the lowest failure rate at 30 percent — but that's still missing nearly 1 in 3 interactions. In response to the Tribune tests, CVS, Walgreens and Wal-Mart each vowed to take significant steps to improve patient safety at its stores nationwide. Combined, the actions affect 22,000 drugstores and involve additional training for 123,000 pharmacists and technicians.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/watchdog/druginteractions/ct-drug-interactions-pharmacy-met-20161214-story.html

Baltimore Sun: Young women treated more harshly in justice system

The Baltimore Sun reports young women are disproportionately locked up for misdemeanors, which are low-level offenses, in Maryland’s juvenile justice system. And they are more likely than boys to be taken before a judge for probation offenses such as running away, breaking curfew and defying their parents. Once in the system, they are often detained longer. At the state’s most secure facilities, they are committed 25 percent longer, on average, than boys, even though girls are less likely to be there for felonies or violent offenses. There are racial disparities as well. African-American girls in Maryland are nearly five times more likely to be referred to the juvenile justice system than white girls. That’s twice the national disparity.

Moreover, juvenile advocates and public defenders say facilities for girls are dilapidated or unsafe. They also offer fewer vocational and treatment options, compared with the facilities for young men.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/investigations/bal-juvenile-justice-gender-gap-20161216-story.html

New York Times: How Russian cyberpower invaded the U.S.

The New York Times reports that when Special Agent Adrian Hawkins of the Federal Bureau of Investigation called the Democratic National Committee in September 2015 to pass along some troubling news about its computer network, he was transferred, naturally, to the help desk. His message was brief, if alarming. At least one computer system belonging to the D.N.C. had been compromised by hackers federal investigators had named “the Dukes,” a cyberespionage team linked to the Russian government. It was the cryptic first sign of a cyberespionage and information-warfare campaign devised to disrupt the 2016 presidential election, the first such attempt by a foreign power in American history. What started as an information-gathering operation, intelligence officials believe, ultimately morphed into an effort to harm one candidate, Hillary Clinton, and tip the election to her opponent, Donald J. Trump.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/13/us/politics/russia-hack-election-dnc.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=a-lede-package-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel: States fail to meet newborn screening goals

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports most states have not met federal benchmarks to screen newborns in a timely manner for serious yet treatable genetic disorders, according to a new report released by the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Although progress has been made, no states met a goal to have 95 percent of results reported to pediatricians within five days of birth for babies with the most time-sensitive conditions. And no states had 95 percent of samples reach their state lab within 24 hours of being collected. As part of a bill signed by President Barack Obama in 2014, the report was required in response to a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel investigation that found infants have died and suffered permanent disabilities because of screening delays by hospitals and state labs. The investigation was triggered by a Wisconsin baby who nearly died and was left brain damaged due to a delayed screening in 2012.

Read more: http://www.jsonline.com/story/news/investigations/2016/12/17/deadly-delays-states-fail-meet-newborn-screening-goals/95482932/

Seattle Times: Earthquake insurances prices soar in Washington  

The Seattle Times reported State Farm filed documents in 2014 with Washington state’s insurance regulator seeking approval to raise earthquake rates around the state, including by 39 percent for commercial property in King County and by 117 percent for Grays Harbor and Pacific counties. A state insurance official called State Farm’s proposed profit “absurdly high” and objected to any rate increase, according to state records. But the regulator, negotiating on the public’s behalf, was at a disadvantage: Insurers in Washington don’t have to offer earthquake insurance if they dislike the terms, and State Farm is the state’s largest licensed provider of quake coverage. When the company refused to back down, Washington’s insurance regulator approved the rate hike, as requested. That lopsided negotiation is typical in Washington, where companies almost always get the earthquake rates they ask for, an examination by The Seattle Times has found.

Read more: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/earthquake-insurance-prices-soar-in-washington-companies-hold-all-power/

Houston Chronicle: No officers indicted in over 200 shootings since 2012

The Houston Chronicle reports prosecutors in all but one of Texas' biggest counties have launched a spate of police officer prosecutions in the shootings of unarmed or mentally ill people over the past three years that parallels a similar rise in police prosecutions nationwide. Harris County, which leads the state in police shootings by a wide margin, is the exception. Prosecutors have presented evidence in more than 200 officer-involved shootings to grand juries here since 2012. One of every five individuals shot by police was unarmed. But in every case, the officer was not indicted, records show. In an interview, newly elected Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg said she will attempt to make videotapes of shootings by officers available first to families and then to the public "as soon as possible" to boost transparency and public confidence of shooting reviews.

Read more: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-prosecutors-pursue-a-spate-of-police-10803724.php

Austin American-Statesman: Officials get $25,000 bonus, no questions asked

The Austin American-Statesman reports a little-known state program that allows the most powerful county officials in Texas to goose their annual salaries by as much as 50 percent operates with no oversight and is being exploited by some, wasting hundreds of thousands of dollars in taxpayer money. Despite their title, constitutional county judges are the top administrative officers in Texas counties, elected to oversee budgets and preside over commissioners courts. They are often compared to city mayors. Yet the state constitution also empowers them to perform many courtroom functions. In smaller or isolated counties lacking law-school-trained judges, especially, the work is essential. For the past 20 years Texas legislators have offered a bonus: County judges who spend at least 40 percent of their time managing court cases can earn a perk on top of their salaries. A Statesman analysis shows some appear to do little for the extra pay. Others perform it more as a lucrative side gig than as a government necessity.

Read more:http://www.statesman.com/news/for-texas-county-judges-000-bonus-with-questions-asked/atRAwtxC6WgaqJXLmWl2OK/

Oregonian: How justice system in Oregon treats trooper who slapped son

The Oregonian reports former state Trooper James Duncan slapped his 11-year-old son so hard across the face that it knocked him down. Duncan could have faced a felony charge and permanently lost the right to have a gun. But that's not what happened. He made a deal to plead guilty to a misdemeanor -- and then went back to court for a do-over when it turned out the first arrangement wasn't as favorable as he had thought. He kept his police certification. And he won special permission to carry a gun for work -- twice. Along the way, Duncan got the benefit of the doubt from the district attorney in Washington County, a trial judge, a retired Oregon Supreme Court justice and the guardians of Oregon's police standards. Even so, he lost his job last month when Oregon State Police decided he couldn't be trusted. But he's already trying to get it back. Duncan's case shows how an elite police officer with powerful friends can negotiate out from under mandatory gun prohibitions.

Read more: http://www.oregonlive.com/washingtoncounty/index.ssf/2016/12/when_a_state_trooper_slaps_his.html#incart_2box

Columbus Dispatch: Ohio’s messy lame duck sessions generate oponents

The Columbus Dispatch reports that to taste the craziness of the Ohio legislature’s lame-duck session it tracked what happened with the most recent concealed-carry legislation. More than two dozen opponents showed up at the Statehouse on Nov. 30 to testify against legislation to expand Ohio’s concealed-carry law — and they talked to mostly empty chairs. Most Senate committee members were elsewhere, including at other committee meetings that were stacked up on the calendar as bills were being rushed into hearings. One witness chastised the panel because only three of 12 senators were present to listen. Two of the three senators then announced that they had to leave for other matters. House Bill 48, which allows concealed carry on college campuses and day-care centers as long as trustees or business owners agree, was amended and passed out of committee. The next day, it was amended again on the Senate floor to alter language involving carrying guns in public buildings, and it was passed. But it became even more complicated.

Read more: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/12/18/ohio-legislatures-rushed-messy-lame-duck-sessions-generate-opponents.html

Kansas City Star: How detectives “dropped ball” in child abuse cases

The Kansas City Star reports a look into the troubled Kansas City Police Department’s Crimes Against Children unit found what one police commander called the biggest systemic failure he had ever seen. The problems were so deep that the Police Department launched an internal affairs investigation and in January suspended seven of the unit’s eight detectives entrusted to seek justice for raped, molested or otherwise abused children. The Smith case is one of scores touched by those detectives winding through the courts, warts and all. Between those cases, and ones never charged, obstacles abound in obtaining justice, The Star found in a new analysis of the fallout of the unit’s failures. The Star first revealed the severity of the unit’s problems three months ago, showing that the department in late 2015 identified nearly 150 “severely mishandled” cases, including “gross negligence” and even possible police deceit.

Read more:http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/crime/article121466762.html

Arizona Republic: $1 billion went to Navajos. So where did it go?

The Arizona Republic reports the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act, or NAHASDA, took effect in 1998 to ease housing shortages in Indian country. The Navajo Nation, the country’s largest tribe and whose reservation is one of the poorest places in America, gets the biggest share — $1.66 billion since it was enacted. Despite that, an Arizona Republic investigation found the Navajo Housing Authority, the agency responsible for that money, has failed in ways almost too numerous to count. Among them, more than $100 million has been squandered on projects that never housed anyone. Some housing developments sit empty years after they were built. In the northern Arizona community of Tolani Lake, nearly $7 million was wasted on igloo-shaped fourplexes that still sit empty.

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/12/14/navajo-housing-federal-funds/94563354/

Minneapolis Star Tribune: Checks on Uber and Lyft drivers “hit or miss”

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports Minneapolis and St. Paul have made it easy for people with criminal records or bad driving histories to work for Uber and rival Lyft by enacting the least restrictive rules of any of the nation’s top 25 metro areas. A Star Tribune review of local laws found the standards that exist are mostly self-enforced by the companies, and drivers who shouldn’t qualify can find ways around the rules. Among those approved to drive here: convicted felons, drivers with as many as four drunken driving convictions and men convicted of crimes related to assaulting their wives and girlfriends. Most continue to drive for the companies, which now provide more rides in the Twin Cities than traditional taxis. When Uber and Lyft came to the Twin Cities in 2013, the companies convinced local officials that tough regulations would make it hard to sign up enough drivers. As a result, the standards are either identical to those Uber and Lyft proposed or, in some cases, more flexible.

Read more: http://www.startribune.com/uber-driver-checks-appear-to-be-hit-or-miss/407231936/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Dec. 13, 2016

Sarasota Herald Tribune: Florida’s broken sentencing system

The Sarasota Herald Tribune reports justice has never been blind when it comes to race in Florida. Blacks were first at the mercy of slave masters. Then came Jim Crow segregation and the Ku Klux Klan. Now, prejudice wears a black robe. Half a century after the civil rights movement, trial judges throughout Florida sentence blacks to harsher punishment than whites, a Herald-Tribune investigation found. They offer blacks fewer chances to avoid jail or scrub away felonies. They give blacks more time behind bars — sometimes double the sentences of whites accused of the same crimes under identical circumstances.

Read more: www.heraldtribune.com/bias

Montgomery Advertiser: Alabama’s “huge shift” in sentencing guidelines,

The Montgomery Advertiser reports the criminal justice system has historically relied on human judgment for sentencing, but Alabama’s recent criminal justice reforms are attempting to equate human error to a quantifiable number. Crimes now equal a score that effectively decides an offender’s punishment. A similar score sheet labels parolees as high, medium or low risk. Alabama is a bit of a trendsetter — for better or for worse — on the criminal justice front, said Bennet Wright, executive director of the Alabama Sentencing Commission tasked with both implementing the 2013 and 2015 reforms as well as crunching the data. “With the passage of the 2015 reforms, I think you’re seeing Alabama acknowledge for the first time that data driven decisions need to be the driving force of all criminal justice policy,” Wright said. “That’s a huge shift in policy.”

 Read more: http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/crime/2016/12/09/how-has-prison-reform-impacted-alabama/95100682/

Arizona Republic: What happened to the investigations into Tom Horne?

The Arizona Repubic reports that more than two years have passed since then-Attorney General Tom Horne, seeking re-election beneath a cloud of controversy, lost the Republican primary to Mark Brnovich. A former employee turned whistleblower came forward claiming Horne was using the Attorney General's Office as a de facto campaign headquarters, with his employees planning events, contacting donors and doing other work related to the race on state time. Horne denied the allegations and called them politically motivated. But no fewer than two separate investigations were launched: one commissioned by the state Solicitor General, and another by the Maricopa County Attorney's Office.  The allegations contributed to Horne's defeat. But since his loss, there has been radio silence about the investigations which helped push him from power.

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/politics/arizona/2016/12/08/whatever-happened-investigations-into-tom-horne-arizona-attorney-general/94072014/

Los Angeles Times: How free coupons help drugmakers hike prices 1,000%

The Los Angeles Times reports Horizon Pharma charges more than $2,000 for a month’s supply of a prescription pain reliever that is the combination of two cheap drugs available separately over the counter. Another company, Novum, sells a small tube of a prescription skin rash cream, containing two inexpensive decades-old medicines, for nearly $8,000. What is key to the companies’ business plan of raising prices by 1,000% or more?  The answer: coupons that deliver Horizon’s pain reliever Vimovo and Novum’s skin cream Alcortin A for as little as nothing to the patient, while leaving America’s health system to pick up much of the rest of the price. Experts warn that the coupons, increasingly being used by dozens of companies, are sharply adding to the nation’s medicine bill. That cost is passed along to most Americans through higher insurance premiums and taxes needed to pay for government health programs.

 Read more: http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-prescription-drug-coupons-20161204-story.html

Denver Post: Only one conviction after thousands of complaints of abuse

The Denver Post reports residents at a state-run center in Pueblo for the severely intellectually disabled were subjected to sexual assaults and ongoing physical abuse and neglect from 2012 to early 2016. Incidents ranging from patient discomfort to more severe allegations of abuse were reported at a rate of about 150 each month to the center’s staff during that time, according to federal records. In the end, just two staff members were charged criminally and only one was convicted, for the petty offense of making too much noise. At least 12 cases were investigated by the Pueblo County Sheriff’s Office. Eight employees were fired. The reasons that so few faced criminal sanctions range from difficulty prosecuting cases in which the victims are mute and incapacitated to a reluctance on the part of co-workers to testify against one another. But a review by The Denver Post also found significant miscues in how police work initially was handled.

Read more: http://www.denverpost.com/2016/12/09/pueblo-regional-center-disabled-neglect-abuse-complaints/

Miami Herald: Suspected of corruption at home, powerful foreigners to U.S.

The Miami Herald reports wealthy politicians and businessmen suspected of corruption in their native lands are fleeing to a safe haven where their wealth and influence shield them from arrest. They have entered this country on a variety of visas, including one designed to encourage investment. Some have applied for asylum, which is intended to protect people fleeing oppression and political persecution. The increasingly popular destination for people avoiding criminal charges is no pariah nation. It’s the United States. An investigation by ProPublica, in conjunction with the Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism at Columbia University, has revealed that officials fleeing prosecution in Colombia, China, South Korea, Bolivia and Panama have found refuge for themselves and their wealth in this country, taking advantage of lax enforcement of U.S. laws and gaps in immigration and financial regulations.

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article119785488.html

Chicago Tribune: Lottery didn’t award 40% of grand prizes

The Chicago Tribune investigation found the Illinois Lottery collected hundreds of millions of dollars from selling tickets to instant games in which it did not hand out all of the life-changing grand prizes — sometimes awarding no grand prizes before ending a game. For the biggest instant games, beginning in 2011 and ending in 2015, the lottery did not award 23 grand prizes, or more than 40 percent of those designed into the games, the Tribune found. While lotteries across the country sometimes do not hand out all grand prizes in every game, Illinois' rate of awarding the top prizes in these games was significantly lower than any state studied by the Tribune. The Tribune also found that, because of how the games ended, the lottery often paid a lower percentage of revenue than the games were designed to pay. While fluctuations are common in the industry, Illinois' results were lower than found elsewhere — keeping millions of dollars from players' pockets.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-illinois-lottery-payout-met-20161209-story.html

Oregonian: National Guard inaction exposes communities to lead

The Oregonian reports an 18-month investigation has found hundreds of armories across the United States have been contaminated by dangerous amounts of lead dust. The Defense Department and state National Guard officials knew about these toxic armories for nearly two decades but moved slowly to address the problem, leaving soldiers, civilian employees and children exposed, records and interviews show. In Oregon alone, tens of thousands of people have spent time in armories covered in lead. Armories in big cities and small towns have housed tearful deployments, joyful reunions and thousands of community events. They're civic landmarks, where part-time soldiers drilled one weekend a month and fired weapons at indoor shooting ranges. But the firearms emitted an insidious form of lead every time a bullet left the chamber.

Read more: http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/page/visitors_soldiers_children_exposed_to_lead_dust_in_armories.html

Austin American-Statesman: DNA gaffes could cost taxpayers up to $14 million

The Austin American-Statesman reports it has learned Travis County and the city of Austin will be forced to spend up to $14 million, according to some estimates, to review and reopen thousands of DNA samples from the shuttered Austin police crime lab — an unexpected cost so high it could result in a significant hike to taxpayers. Officials are still trying to estimate how much it will take to ensure that faulty lab work has not resulted in wrongful convictions and that forensic analysis in pending cases is accurate. The revelations about the expenses are the latest unwelcome surprise concerning the lab that centers on its troubled DNA unit. Those issues have ranged from lab staff not using commonly accepted national practices to a supervisor’s decision to keep mum about a freezer housing hundreds of vials of DNA evidence that sat broken for eight days, potentially damaging the samples. The lab closed six months ago and its future remains uncertain.

Read more: http://www.statesman.com/news/gaffes-austin-dna-lab-could-cost-taxpayers-million/b1fw0GMQT31XvMUp5RWFGJ/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Dec. 8, 2016

Santa Fe New Mexican: Case highlights flaws in investigating police shootings

The Santa Fe News Mexican reports the killing of James Boyd, a mentally ill homeless man, by Albuquerque police in 2014 ignited the city’s largest street protests in a generation and fueled criticism of a department with a record of using excessive force. Capping the furor was the three-week murder trial against the two officers whose bullets felled the 38-year-old man who was camping illegally and occasionally flashed two pocketknives while surrounded by nearly 20 police officers. The trial ended in a hung jury in October after jurors could not reach a unanimous verdict. Lawyers for the officers called the outcome justice, noting that nine of the jurors voted to acquit. But a close examination of the proceedings and interviews with legal experts and the special prosecutor reveal a system that is fraught with conflicts of interest and ultimately ill-equipped to determine whether a police shooting has veered from negligent to criminal.

Read more: http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/local_news/boyd-case-highlights-flaws-in-system-for-investigating-police-shootings/article_cc8960f0-8562-58c7-b60e-8c93b8f0aa85.html

San Francisco Chronicle: A fashionable San Francisco charity’s ugly reality

The San Francisco Chronicle reports an examination of the public financial records of Helpers Community Inc. — known until 2015 as Helpers of the Mentally Retarded — shows the $6 million charity appears to have strayed from its cause, pursuing questionable practices with scant oversight from a small board that includes its director, Joy Venturini Bianchi, and her longtime friend. Over the last decade, filings to the Internal Revenue Service reveal the nonprofit has done little charitable work while amassing millions of dollars in assets and donations and generously compensating Bianchi, as she travels to red-carpet galas from Beverly Hills to Manhattan, appearing alongside celebrities such as Demi Moore, Gwyneth Paltrow and Katy Perry. Helpers’ mission statement defines its “most pressing and important goal” as supporting quality residential care for the developmentally disabled. But in the past 13 years, the charity has given nothing to residential programs.

Read more: http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/A-fashionable-San-Francisco-charity-s-ugly-10657999.php

San Diego Union Tribune: Police have paid nothing in excessive force cases

The San Diego Union Tribune reports the city of El Cajon, thrust into the national spotlight in September when police shot and killed Alfred Olango, an unarmed black man, has had a spotless record the past five years defending its police over claims of excessive force or civil-rights violations. A review of the legal claims filed against the Police Department during that time shows the city has not paid out any money to claimants or plaintiffs. The largest expense has come in legal costs to the city for handling the claims. That totals $438,836. The only significant police-related payout in recent years was made to one of the department’s own employees. Officer Christine Greer settled a sexual harassment lawsuit filed against Sgt. Richard Gonsalves for $90,000 last year.

Read more: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/public-safety/sd-me-elcajon-claims-20161201-story.html

Washington Post: “Second chance” law puts violent criminals back on streets

The Washington Post reports that hundreds of criminals sentenced by D.C. judges under an obscure local law crafted to give second chances to young adult offenders have gone on to rob, rape or kill residents of the nation’s capital. The original intent of the law was to rehabilitate inexperienced criminals under the age of 22. The District’s Youth Rehabilitation Act allows for shorter sentences for some crimes and an opportunity for offenders to emerge with no criminal record. But a Washington Post investigation has found a pattern of violent offenders returning rapidly to the streets and committing more crimes. Hundreds have been sentenced under the act multiple times. In dozens of cases, D.C. judges were able to hand down Youth Act sentences shorter than those called for under mandatory minimum laws designed to deter armed robberies and other violent crimes. The criminals have often repaid that leniency by escalating their crimes of violence upon release.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/second-chance-law-for-young-criminals-puts-violent-offenders-back-on-dc-streets/2016/12/02/fcb56c74-8bc1-11e6-875e-2c1bfe943b66_story.html?utm_term=.1dc91743350a

Sun Sentinel: Death on their watch

The Sun Sentinel reports that Armor Correctional Health Services of Miami, the private company paid to handle jail health care, has failed to protect some Broward inmates endangered by their mental illnesses -- with deadly consequences. Among other finding, a Sun Sentinel examination of inmate deaths since 2010 and a review of thousands of pages of court, medical and jail records showed:

• Armor left severely mentally ill inmates unmedicated and malnourished, despite having the authority to help them. Lack of medication can worsen mental health symptoms, leading mentally ill people to not eat and to harm themselves.

• Despite longstanding concerns about the impact of isolation on mentally ill inmates, seven killed themselves or suffered dramatic weight loss while being held alone in cells.

• Armor staff acknowledged mishandling the care of at least four mentally ill inmates before their deaths.

Read more: http://projects.sun-sentinel.com/projects/jaildeath/

Chicago Tribune: Local taxpayers paying more for schools in Illinois

The Chicago Tribune reports local taxes and school fees in Illinois now make up 67.4 percent of revenue for school districts statewide — the highest percentage in at least 15 years, according to the most recent state finance data. The state contributes 24.9 percent — one of the lowest shares in the country — and the federal government 7.7 percent. The local portion for education has slowly climbed since 2001, when local dollars covered, on average, 61.9 percent of K-12 public school expenses in Illinois. A confluence of factors affects the figures, including rising and falling levels of state aid. Some school administrators say local tax dollars are making up for what they say is a lack of funding from the state. At the same time, some districts are leaning on local taxpayers to make a steeper investment in education. The reliance on local dollars also has exacerbated the unequal funding for schools, as wealthy districts pump in local revenue to spend more on students, while less affluent districts can't keep up.

Read more:http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-school-finances-met-20161202-story.html

Maine Sunday Telegram: Safety net is failing in Maine

The Maine Sunday Telegram reports that when Pineland Center closed in April 1996, advocates and state officials considered it a major victory for adults with intellectual disabilities. Maine emerged as a national leader in how to provide quality care for this population in community group homes, rather than large institutions. But since the late 2000s, Maine has been turning the clock back on these adult services, advocates say, leaving thousands of adults with autism, brain damage, Down syndrome, and other intellectual developmental disorders vulnerable. Leaders of nonprofits say the system of community-based services is on the verge of collapse. Currently, about 1,200 developmentally challenged adults are on a waiting list – or about one of every four to five people who qualify for the service, according to state statistics. That’s a tenfold increase since 2008, when the waiting list stood at 111.

Read more: http://www.pressherald.com/2016/12/04/we-are-not-a-thing-that-can-be-put-in-a-box-advocates-for-adults-with-intellectual-disabilities-decry-cuts-to-system/

Minneapolis Star Tribune: Extreme isolation scars state inmates

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports thousands of inmates in Minnesota are punished with solitary confinement — which inmates call “seg,” for segregation, or the “hole” — for long periods of time, frequently for just minor infractions, and often with no regard for their mental illnesses. An examination of state Department of Corrections records from the past decade shows more than 1,600 inmates in Minnesota have been held in such isolation for at least six months. Four hundred and thirty-seven have endured stays of a year or longer. One man spent more than seven consecutive years in solitary. Another spent longer than 10 years. Across the country, states are taking new steps to either curtail or review solitary confinement, and the federal government also has cut the use of solitary confinement in its detention facilities by 25 percent in recent years. But in Minnesota, the state’s prisons continue to rely on the use of solitary confinement.

Read more:http://www.startribune.com/excessive-solitary-confinement-scars-minnesota-prison-inmates/396197801/

New York Times: The scourge of racial bias in New York state prisons

The New York Times reports its review of tens of thousands of disciplinary cases against prison inmates in 2015, hundreds of pages of internal reports and three years of parole decisions found that racial disparities were embedded in the prison experience in New York. In most prisons, blacks and Latinos were disciplined at higher rates than whites — in some cases twice as often, the analysis found. They were also sent to solitary confinement more frequently and for longer durations. At Clinton, a prison near the Canadian border where only one of the 998 guards is African-American, black inmates were nearly four times as likely to be sent to isolation as whites, and they were held there for an average of 125 days, compared with 90 days for whites. A greater share of black inmates are in prison for violent offenses, and minority inmates are disproportionately younger, factors that could explain why an inmate would be more likely to break prison rules, state officials said. But even after accounting for these elements, the disparities in discipline persisted, The Times found.

Read more:http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/03/nyregion/new-york-state-prisons-inmates-racial-bias.html

Cleveland Plain Dealer: All ticket costs are not equal in northeast Ohio

The Cleveland Plain Dealer reports speeding in Northeast Ohio could cost you $100 in one spot and $200 on the other side of the street, according to a cleveland.com analysis. It all depends on where you're stopped - how much the fine is in that town, what it costs to run the court and what special fees are tacked on top. Cleveland.com collected the costs of speeding tickets in 69 mayor's and municipal courts in 195 communities across six Northeast Ohio counties. The total cost for driving 50 mph in a 35 mph zone? It ranged from $81 in Lagrange in Lorain County to $222 in East Cleveland. Get busted for disorderly conduct and you're looking at fines from $114 (Seven Hills) to $283 (Rocky River). And for driving with a license that expired a month before, $87 to $272 (Lagrange and East Cleveland, again.)

Read more:http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2016/11/how_much_will_your_speeding_ti.html

Dallas Morning News: How a hospital died under the care of a Texas doctor

The Dallas Morning News reports the only hospital in Tonopah, Neveda, shut down in August of 2015 leaving the only major town between Las Vegas and Reno without an emergency room or clinic. A raft of residents, local officials and health-care experts say they know who is to blame for the hospital's demise: a Texas doctor and businessman who drained it of millions of dollars while splurging on fancy hotels, lavish meals and a 100-acre Hill Country ranch. Under a fragmented and often toothless regulatory system, no one stepped in to stop him despite years of red flags. The doctor, Vincent F. Scoccia, did not respond to repeated interview requests or written questions about the hospital. The Dallas Morning News pieced together the sometimes bizarre tale through dozens of interviews and a review of thousands of pages of hospital records and court filings. Scoccia has not been charged with any crimes.

Read more:http://interactives.dallasnews.com/2016/hospital-wreckers/

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Landlords keep identities secret

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that Elijah Mohammad Rashaed, a major central city-landlord with a trail of code violations, court fines and lawsuits, has long frustrated Milwaukee building inspectors and creditors with a dizzying array of companies created to run some 180 rental properties. Rashaed and other landlords are routinely using LLCs to avoid paying fines incurred for renting out substandard, unsafe housing or for violating ordinances aimed at preserving neighborhoods. In all, LLCs owed the city nearly $3 million in past due fines for building code violations, as of Nov. 7. At least $9 million more is owed in delinquent property taxes. The fines, involving 777 LLCs, were imposed in 1,927 court cases dating to 2004. Yet the city does not go after Rashaed — or those behind other LLCs that own problem-plagued housing — personally to collect the money. City and court officials say it's difficult to determine true ownership and, if they could, those behind the LLCs are protected by law.

Read more:http://www.jsonline.com/story/news/investigations/2016/12/03/landlords-try-keep-identities-secret-cat-and-mouse-game/93925898/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM THE PAST WEEK • Nov. 30

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Doctors and sex abuse: a nationwide study

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports a 50-state examination found that only one – Delaware -- has anything close to a comprehensive set of laws protecting patients from doctors who commit acts of sexual abuse. “Instead of looking out for victims or possible victims or protecting our society, we’re protecting doctors,” said Rep. Kimberly Williams, a member of the Delaware General Assembly who sponsored a patient-protection bill last year. As part of its ongoing “Doctors & Sex Abuse” series, the AJC studied five categories of laws in every state to determine the best and worst at shielding patients from sexually abusive doctors. Not a single state met the highest bar in every category the newspaper examined, although Delaware came the closest. Meanwhile, in 49 states and the District of Columbia, multiple gaps in laws can leave patients vulnerable to abusive physicians, according to the newspaper.

Read more: http://www.ajc.com/news/national/state-review-uncovers-how-patients-are-vulnerable-abusive-physicians/MrE462LHAPKilYj3SA2crN/

Arizona Daily Star: Critics decry tax breaks for Monsanto

The Arizona Daily Star reports the Pima County Board of Supervisors expects to hear hours of objections to a 7-acre greenhouse that global biotech giant Monsanto Co. wants to put in rural Avra Valley, northwest of Tucson. Critics are upset not just about Monsanto’s plans to operate here, but also about County Administrator Chuck Huckelberry’s support of incentives that would reduce the company’s property taxes by two-thirds. The company promises $95 million to $105 million in investments, 40 to 60 jobs paying an average of $44,000 a year and an emphasis on sustainability. The greenhouse will turn out a new generation of corn seed varieties, both conventional and genetically modified, that will help farmers around the world have more productive and resilient crops, Monsanto says. But critics — who have organized rallies and circulated petitions against the deal — say Monsanto’s presence would seriously damage Tucson’s burgeoning reputation as an international City of Gastronomy. UNESCO bestowed the title last December.

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/local/critics-decry-tax-breaks-as-monsanto-plans--acre-greehouse/article_fc68f09d-51cc-5b2d-999c-620da6c0912d.html

Los Angeles Times: Breitbart News, fiery and conservative, plans to go global

The Los Angeles Times reports that as Donald Trump prepares to take office as president, the Breitbart News Network stands poised to become one of the most influential conservative media companies in the country. Stephen K. Bannon, the site’s controversial executive chairman, was a key figure in Trump’s campaign and has been named chief White House strategist. For Breitbart, this could mean a direct line to the West Wing, a level of media access unprecedented in modern times, according to experts. While some believe this will turn the outlet into an extension of the Trump administration, leaders at Breitbart see it as an opportunity that will allow them to compete not only with conservative rivals like Fox News, but the entire media firmament, which it sees as dishonest about its left-leaning bias.

Read More: http://www.latimes.com/business/hollywood/la-fi-ct-breitbart-news-20161116-story.html

San Diego Union Tribune: Affordable housing additions don’t keep up

The San Diego Union Tribune reports that despite billions of taxpayer dollars spent to provide affordable housing, San Diego is apparently losing ground — opening up fewer low-income units than the ones that are shutting down. The newspaper says that a review of  public meeting minutes and property and financial records, city officials agreed to remove 10,000 affordable dwellings from the rolls over the past six years — the same number the San Diego Housing Commission has opened since its inception in 1979. The city’s affordable housing laws generally require that the homes demolished, converted or otherwise removed from low-income housing stock be replaced. But in many cases, projects were granted waivers or found to be exempt from rules that would force developers to either pay a fee or set aside some percentage of new housing units as affordable.

Read more: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/data-watch/sd-me-affordable-housing-20161115-story.html

Washington Post: Zuckerberg outlines Facebook’s ideas to battle fake news

The Washington Post reports that a week after trying to reassure the public that it was “extremely unlikely hoaxes changed the outcome of this election,” Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg outlined several ways the company might try to stop the spread of fake news on the platform in the future. “We’ve been working on this problem for a long time and we take this responsibility seriously. We’ve made significant progress, but there is more work to be done,” Zuckerberg wrote in a post on his own Facebook page He then named seven approaches the company was considering to address the issue, including warning labels on false stories, easier user reporting methods and the integration of third-party verification. “The problems here are complex, both technically and philosophically,” he cautioned, repeating the company’s long-standing aversion to becoming the “arbiters of truth” — instead preferring to rely on third parties and users to make those distinctions.

“We need to be careful not to discourage sharing of opinions or mistakenly restricting accurate content,” he said.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-intersect/wp/2016/11/19/mark-zuckerberg-outlines-facebooks-ideas-to-battle-fake-news/

Stamford Advocate: Schools demand more from next building contractor

The Stamford Advocate reports that on the night before the long Veterans Day weekend, school officials quietly released a document that could wean the district from its powerful, controversial contractor.. The document, a request for proposals, lays out everything the district wants from the next contractor it hires to manage school buildings. It will demand from any future company more than was demanded from its 16-year facilities director, AFB Construction Management. The document illustrates what the district should have asked from AFB all along. The Board of Education has a history of not questioning AFB but, eight months ago, the FBI began investigating whether the company used its position to solicit payments from another municipal contractor. The city was ordered to turn over all records pertaining to AFB to a federal grand jury in New Haven.

Read more:http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/news/article/Stamford-schools-demand-more-from-next-building-10624371.php

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Housing agency skirts salary cap for top execs

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that the Atlanta Housing Authority’s publicly paid executives have evaded federal rules that were put in place to crack down on extravagant pay. An Atlanta Constitution-Journal investigation found that since 2012, the authority has supplemented six-figure salaries paid to its top executives by $4 million, using money from a little-known nonprofit that shares revenues with AHA and other Georgia housing authorities. The money could have been spent on housing services for the poor — that’s what some other housing agencies have done — but Atlanta officials elected to devote it to salaries instead.

Revenue AHA receives from National Housing Compliance in Tucker has kept top Atlanta authority salaries at levels higher than almost every other public housing authority in the nation — and well above the $158,700 annual cap on federal housing money that can be spent on those salaries.

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/news/local-govt-politics/atlanta-housing-agency-skirts-salary-cap-for-top-e/ns9yG/

Chicago Tribune: Illinois hides abuse and neglect of adults with disabilities

The Chicago Tribune reports that as Illinois steers thousands of low-income adults with disabilities into private group homes, the newspaper has found many casualties in a botched strategy to save money and give some of the state's poorest and most vulnerable residents a better life. In the first comprehensive accounting of mistreatment inside Illinois' taxpayer-funded group homes and their day programs, the Tribune uncovered a system where caregivers often failed to provide basic care while regulators cloaked harm and death with secrecy and silence. The Tribune identified 1,311 cases of documented harm since July 2011 — hundreds more cases than publicly reported by the Illinois Department of Human Services. Confronted with those findings, Human Services officials retracted five years of erroneous reports and said the department had launched reforms to ensure accurate reporting. To circumvent state secrecy, the Tribune filed more than 100 public records requests with government agencies.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/test/mike/chi-test-mike-story-16-htmlstory.html

Des Moines Register: Speed cameras sang thousands from out of state

The Des Moines Register reports tens of thousands of out-of-state motorists were snagged last year by automated traffic enforcement speed cameras in Des Moines, Cedar Rapids and Sioux City. The three are the only U.S. cities that have speed enforcement cameras monitoring interstates, according to the Iowa Department of Transportation. Speed cameras in those three cities issued more than 200,000 speeding tickets in 2015 to motorists traveling on interstates, generating more than $13 million in revenue, according to a Des Moines Register review of data obtained through public-records requests. Two of every five citations, 78,228 in all, were sent to out-of-state motorists. And a majority of citations were issued to people who weren't residents of the city where they were ticketed.

Read more: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/crime-and-courts/2016/11/19/automated-traffic-enforcement-cameras/92676970/

Minneapolis Star Tribune: Rule breakers bring dark side to ride-share culture

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports Uber and the rival service Lyft now provide more car rides than traditional taxicabs in the Twin Cities.  Operating with little city oversight and less stringent rules than taxis, an informal and dangerous ride-sharing culture has emerged in which people casually hail unmarked cars and barter for rides. Uber and Lyft both tell customers they shouldn’t get in vehicles unless they first book their ride through the companies’ phone apps. But many people ignore the warnings, accepting rides from strangers who sometimes turn out to be predators. At least five women in the Twin Cities have been abducted or assaulted by men who presented themselves as Uber drivers in the past two years, police reports show. In Atlanta, Los Angeles and other cities, men pretending to work for Uber have been charged with attacking women after luring them into their cars. Chicago police warned last year of robbers posing as Uber drivers.

Read more: http://m.startribune.com/rule-breakers-bring-dark-side-to-ride-share-culture/402072965/

Houston Chronicle: Mentally ill lose out as special ed declines

The Houston Chronicle reports the Texas Education Agency's decision to set an 8.5 percent target for special education enrollment has led schools to cut services for children with all types of disabilities, but mentally ill students have been disproportionately affected, the Houston Chronicle has found. Federal law requires schools to provide counseling, therapy, protection from discipline and other support to children with "emotional disturbances," including severe anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. Today, however, Texas schools serve 42 percent fewer of those students relative to overall enrollment, than when TEA set the benchmark in 2004. It is a bigger drop than has occurred in almost any other disability category. In all, an estimated 500,000 school-age children in Texas have a serious mental illness that interferes with their functioning in family, school or community activities, according to the state Health and Human Services Commission.

Read more: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/article/Mentally-ill-lose-out-as-special-ed-declines-10623706.php

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • NOV. 16

Houston Chronicle: Bad mix: Risky cargo in dense areas

The Houston Chronicle reports back in 1976 a tractor-trailer on Interstate 610 struck a bridge rail, rolled over the edge and fell about 15 feet onto the Southwest Freeway below. The tractor separated from the trailer, and its tank exploded, spewing 7,509 gallons of anhydrous ammonia. The toxic fog killed six people and injured 178. Afterward, the National Transportation Safety Board praised the city of Houston for having designated the 610 Loop as the official route for hazardous materials, keeping trucks from more populous areas. Forty years later, that route snakes through a city that has doubled in size, leaving Houston vulnerable to a catastrophic accident. About 400 trucks a day loaded with tons of hazardous chemicals, such as chlorine, butadiene and formaldehyde, inch along 610 in bumper-to-bumper traffic and pass within a mile of NRG Stadium, Memorial Park and the Galleria shopping center.

Read more: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/chemical-breakdown/7/

Austin American-Statesman: Feds shield employers who violated rights of vets

The Austin American-Statesman reports that as waves of National Guard reservists answered the call to serve in Iraq and Afghanistan over the past decade, they were protected by a 1994 law that required their employers to hold their jobs until they returned. But records show that hundreds of employers have been found to have violated the rights of veterans by firing them because of their military responsibilities, or failing to hire them back after their service ended, or denying them promotions. Some of those employers are government agencies. Yet the Department of Labor, which investigates potential USERRA violations on behalf of service members, refuses to disclose the identities of even the most frequent offenders, shielding the companies from public scrutiny despite repeated complaints and findings of fault. The department also shielded the identities of taxpayer-supported state, local and federal agencies that ran afoul of the law.

Read more: http://www.statesman.com/news/federal-agency-shields-employers-that-violate-the-rights-veterans/twmwggTzVraYq3jDZT0RXL/

Columbus Dispatch: More “elder orphans” without family near needing help.

The Columbus Dispatch reports nearly a quarter of Americans older than 65 are — or are at risk of becoming — what some experts call “elder orphans.” They are people who are getting older without a spouse, partner or adult children — or at least any who live nearby. With an aging baby boomer population and a third of Americans ages 45 to 60 either choosing to be or finding themselves single, the number of seniors living alone will only grow, experts say. Many will need extra help with health care and household tasks as they age or their health deteriorates. “Most of us will have caregiving needs at one time or other,” said Dr. Maria Carney, a New York geriatrician. “Our goal is to highlight that this is a vulnerable population that’s likely to increase.” She’d like officials to determine what community, social services, emergency response and educational resources are needed to help, particularly as more people with multiple chronic diseases remain at home.

Read more: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/11/13/1-vulnerable-elder-orphan-population-growing.html

Democrat and Chronicle: Lead tainting Geneva’s soil kept hidden for 30 years

The Democrat and Chronicle reports New York state officials first uncovered evidence 30 years ago that toxic metals from an old foundry in the historic Finger Lakes city of Geneva had contaminated an adjoining neighborhood. A state environmental health expert concluded then that people were at risk of lead poisoning and neighbors should be warned. A decade later, consultants presented additional evidence to state and city and recommended that the lead-laden soil in yards be removed. But state and city officials never warned residents and the decision to clean it up was deferred 16 more years, a Democrat and Chronicle investigation has found. The silence ended only in early October, when state environmental officials mailed letters to nearly 100 properties near the former Geneva Foundry site, informing the owners their soil contained lead or arsenic in concentrations that are considered unsafe.

Read more: http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/2016/11/13/lead-tainting-genevas-soil-kept-hidden-30-years/92896708/

New York Times: Your cellphone is a 10-digit key code to your private life

The New York Times reports that the next time someone asks you for your cellphone number, you may want to think twice about giving it. The cellphone number is more than just a bunch of digits. It is increasingly used as a link to private information maintained by all sorts of companies, including moneylenders and social networks. It can be used to monitor and predict what you buy, look for online or even watch on television. It has become “kind of a key into the room of your life and information about you,” said Edward M. Stroz, a former high-tech crime agent for the F.B.I. who is co-president of Stroz Friedberg, a private investigator. Yet the cellphone number is not a legally regulated piece of information like a Social Security number, which companies are required to keep private. That is a growing issue for young people, since two sets of digits may well be with them for life: their Social Security number and their cellphone number.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/13/business/cellphone-number-social-security-number-10-digit-key-code-to-private-life.html

Newark Star Ledger: Lobbyists reviled by Trump in campaign join transition

The Newark Star Ledger reports Donald Trump, who promised to "take our country back from the special interests," is staffing his presidential transition team with lobbyists and fundraisers. "It certainly veers drastically from the campaign rhetoric," said David Vance, a spokesman for Common Cause, which supports stronger ethics laws. "It's business as usual in Washington. He's gathering the same old guard around him. It hardly rings of change." Trump had called for new ethics rules, including limits on lobbyists and term limits for members of Congress. "My contract with the American voter begins with a plan to end government corruption – and to take our country back from the special interests," Trump said in Minnesota on Sunday. Trump's proposed ethics legislation doesn't fix the problem and likely won't pass, experts say.

Read more: http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2016/11/lobbyists_and_big_donors_reviled_by_trump_in_campa.html

Boston Globe: Organic farmers fight USDA to defend their turf

The Boston Globe reports that for the past 36 years Dave Chapman has dug his hands into the soil to plant, then pick, organic tomatoes from his fields and greenhouses in rural Vermont. His love of organics is rooted in a simple motto: “Feed the soil, not the plant.” So when he heard that hydroponic growers were starting to obtain USDA certification that declared their crops organic, Chapman was incensed. What is organic, he wondered, without the marvel of microbes inherent in dirt? “They try to pretend that they’re me,” he said. “They aren’t. It’s a lie.” Now Chapman is digging in his heels against what he calls the invasive growth of organic hydroponics, grown by farmers who use extensive watering systems and chemical nutrients. He’s pushing the USDA to, as he puts it, “keep the soil in organic” and prevent hydroponic farmers from gaining a designation that’s become both on-trend and remarkably lucrative.

Read more: https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2016/11/12/organic-farmers-fight-usda-defend-their-turf/hatKOH0ClfmbqyMMwemHBJ/story.html

Baltimore Sun: Few doctors sign on to recommend marijuana in Maryland

The Baltimore Sun reports just 1 percent of the 16,000 doctors who treat patients in Maryland have signed up for the state's medical marijuana program, and two of the largest hospital systems in the state have banned their physicians from participating. The lack of enthusiasm threatens to undermine the fledgling program by limiting access to the drug that has shown promise in easing pain and other severe conditions. "Clearly there are not going to be enough physicians, given the level of demand anticipated," said Gene Ransom, CEO of MedChi, the state's professional association for physicians, which hasn't taken a position on medical marijuana. "That's going to create a problem."

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/bs-hs-marijuana-doctors-20161112-story.html

Maine Sunday Telegram: Jacket sales at L.L. Bean indicate warmer winters

The Maine Sunday Telegram reports that just like shrinking Arctic sea ice, sales of jackets at L.L. Bean are an indicator of warming winters. Ten years ago, the best-selling jacket at Maine’s flagship outdoors retailer was a heavily insulated parka rated for temperatures between 10 degrees and minus 40. Today, the top seller is an ultralight down jacket rated between 25 and minus 25. Coming on strong is a down sweater that weighs almost nothing and is rated between 30 and minus 20. A warming climate might be hotly contested by some, but the appeal of a lighter winter jacket isn’t. It’s an industry-wide trend driven by consumer demand, not science or ideology. “It has been the biggest shift in the outerwear business in the past five years,” said A.J. Curran, product director for outerwear at L.L. Bean. “We call it seasonal versatility. People can use (these jackets) through a normal winter day, what has become the new normal.”

Read more: http://www.pressherald.com/2016/11/13/as-climate-shifts-beans-customers-warm-to-lighter-jackets/

Courier-Journal: Diabetes a scourge in Kentucky

The Courier Journal reports that from Louisville to Pikeville, Paducah to Ashland, diabetes ravages Kentucky, striking more than one in nine adults — a statistic that has skyrocketed in the last two decades and shows no sign of slowing. Kentucky’s rate of diagnosed diabetes shot up from 4.3 percent in 1994 to 11.3 percent in 2014, ranking the state sixth-worst in a nation that has seen diabetes double over that time. That's according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey, which ranks neighboring Indiana 18th with 9.7 percent, slightly above the national average. Diabetes takes thousands of lives each year and the American Diabetes Association estimates related medical costs and lost productivity total around $3.85 billion in Kentucky, $6.6 billion in Indiana, and $245 billion nationally.  Kentucky is also plagued by all the social ills that cause diabetes to fester. Chief among them is poverty, which makes it tough to eat well, find safe places to exercise or get to the doctor and avoid complications such as blindness and amputations.

Read more: http://www.courier-journal.com/story/life/wellness/health/2016/11/12/diabetes-scourge-kentucky/89529048/

Des Moines Register: Iowa police killings prompt look at tougher penalties

The des Moines Register reports the recent ambush slayings of two Iowa police officers has pulled the state into a national debate on whether law enforcement officers need extra legal protections. Support is growing for an Iowa lawmaker’s proposal that would slap stiffer penalties on those who seriously injure or kill officers. And some in the state say they would not oppose reinstating the death penalty for cop killers. Iowa hasn't allowed capital punishment since 1965. At the federal level, momentum may grow to make attacks on law enforcement officers a hate crime, potentially boosted by last week’s election results, giving Republicans control of Congress and the Oval Office. President-elect Donald Trump billed himself as a "law and order" candidate and has been an ardent supporter of the Blue Lives Matter movement.

Read more: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/politics/2016/11/11/blue-lives-matter-legislation/93600380/

Sun Sentinel: A din of health concerns from courthouse employees

The Sun Sentinel reports that in dozens of emails sent to Broward County, courthouse prosecutors and judges say the building they work in is making them sick. They report rashes, hives, coughs that won't go away, migraine headaches, itchy eyes, sore throats, nosebleeds and cancer. While a new courthouse has been under construction next door, the county has quietly settled —while "expressly denying" liability — 13 lawsuits during the past two years filed by employees, according to public records examined by the Sun Sentinel. Each fell under the $15,000 threshold that requires a County Commission vote at a public meeting. Now that the new tower is more than a year behind schedule, the steady din of health grievances in the old courthouse is growing louder. In emails to county hall, 120 employees, some of them judges, many of them prosecutors, described health problems they said appear or worsen when they're at work.

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fl-courthouse-judges-ill-20161113-story.html

Washington Post: Parents insisting on doctors who insist on vaccinations

The Washington Post reports that pediatricians around the country, faced with persistent opposition to childhood vaccinations, are increasingly grappling with the difficult decision of whether to dismiss those families from their practices to protect their other patients. Doctors say they are more willing to take this last-resort step because the anti-vaccine movement in recent years has contributed to a resurgence of preventable childhood diseases such as measles, mumps and whooping cough. Their practices also have been emboldened by families who say they will only choose physicians who require other families to vaccinate. But the decision is ethically fraught. Doctors must balance their obligation to care for individual children against the potential harm to other patients. They must respect parents’ right to make their own medical decisions. And they need to consider the public health consequences of a refusal to treat, which could result in non-vaccinating families clustered in certain practices, raising the risk of disease outbreaks.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/parents-are-insisting-on-doctors-who-insist-on-vaccinations/2016/11/12/81c1a684-a202-11e6-8d63-3e0a660f1f04_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories-2_vaccine-610pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

Sacramento Bee: Is reservoir a savior for the Sacramento Valley?

The Sacramento Bee reports that an hour north of Sacramento, in a ghost town tucked into a remote mountain valley, California is poised to build a massive new reservoir – a water project of a size that hasn’t been undertaken since Jerry Brown’s first stint as governor in the 1970s. Sites Reservoir, all $4.4 billion of it, represents an about-face in a state where drought has become the norm and water users are told to scrimp and save. Promoters of Sites say the reservoir would significantly enhance water supplies for the rice farms of the Sacramento Valley as well as the cities of Southern California. The fact that it would be built just outside tiny Maxwell, in a poor and often-overlooked area of the state, has become a point of fierce regional pride. “Instead of the water going out to sea, the water will remain here,” said state Sen. Jim Nielsen, R-Gerber, during a recent media event at the Sites operations office a few miles east of the reservoir location. “That is a significant policy change.”

Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/news/state/california/water-and-drought/article114201138.html

Arizona Daily Star: Pharmacy spending soars in Tucson area under Cenpatico

The Arizona Daily Star reports that Tucson behavioral-health providers say they have seen surging pharmacy spending since Cenpatico Integrated Care took over Southern Arizona’s public behavioral-health care system. At the same time, the number of prescriptions written for behavioral-health patients appears to have declined in the past year. Three local behavioral-health agency leaders say the limited pharmacy data they have from Cenpatico indicate average monthly pharmacy spending on their patients soared by 53 to 83 percent this year. “I’ve never seen anything like that level of increase in that short a period of time,” said Rod Cook, chief financial officer at COPE Community Services, where pharmacy spending has gone up 74 percent. Cenpatico and AHCCCS, the state’s Medicaid agency, attribute the spending rise to a drug-company rebate program that has resulted in more brand-name prescribing this year.

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/pharmacy-costs-soar-under-cenpatico/article_2671dc4d-289b-559d-b488-69c1fead6187.html

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM THE PAST WEEK • NOV. 8

AP: Trump-Pence campaign aide stays on Indiana payroll
The Associated Press reported that a key aide to Donald Trump's vice presidential nominee, Gov. Mike Pence, continues to earn $23,000 a month as Indiana's sole Washington lobbyist even as he has taken a paid position with the Republican presidential campaign and regularly travels with Pence to political rallies across the country during working hours. The dual, simultaneous employment of Joshua Pitcock is unusual. Legal and ethics experts contacted by The Associated Press said the government lobbyist should be subject to the same ethics rules as rank-and-file state employees, which generally prohibit such double-dipping. A separate prohibition against moonlighting bans Indiana state employees from accepting outside employment or undertaking activities that are not compatible with their public duties, would impair their independence or judgment, or pose a likely conflict of interest.

Read more: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/politics-government/national-politics/article112225502.html

Sacramento Bee: Home for sex victims closed but non-profit still raised funds

The Sacramento Bee reports Courage House got the good news from the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services on June 17: a $60,808 grant had been approved to help fund services at the Northern California home for young sex-trafficking victims. What the state agency didn’t know at the time was that the Courage House outside Sacramento had closed three days earlier, shuttling the four remaining girls off to other providers amid a rash of citations from regulators, including allegations of inadequate staffing and repeat violations of clients’ rights. Over the summer, Courage Worldwide Inc. emailed OES at least eight times without divulging the local facility’s status. While the Rocklin-based nonprofit was laying off much of its staff, a remaining worker was asking OES for advice on the forms and submitting documents for reimbursement, according to emails provided by OES.

Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/news/investigations/article112839713.html

New Haven Register: Police build voluntary DNA database; ACLU objects

The New Haven Register reports that four years ago the Branford Police Department started collecting voluntary cheek swabs from people suspected of a crime prior to arrest to build its own private DNA database of offenders. Five hundred and sixty-five samples have since been collected, and the department has been able to tie suspects to property crimes that would otherwise go unsolved. But the practice has drawn criticism from the American Civil Liberties Union’s Connecticut chapter about whether it violates a person’s constitutional rights and creates an unconscious racial bias. Collecting a person’s DNA is far more invasive than the search of a backpack or the taking of a fingerprint, said David McGuire, interim executive director of the ACLU’s Connecticut chapter.

Read more: http://www.nhregister.com/general-news/20161105/branford-police-build-voluntary-dna-database-but-aclu-says-its-bad-public-policy

Washington Post: Killings surge but Chicago police solve fewer homicides

The Washington Post reports Chicago’s growing body count of unsolved homicides puts it on pace to have one of its deadliest years in two decades, and some residents blame police for perpetuating the violence by leaving killers on the streets. Last year, Chicago police cleared homicides at one-third the rate they did 25 years ago — a time when they faced twice as many killings, according to a Washington Post analysis of police data obtained through a public records request. The department has gone from having one of the best clearance rates nationwide to one of the worst. In 1991, Chicago police solved about 80 percent of all homicides in the city, compared with about 62 percent by police nationwide, according to data from the FBI and Chicago police. Since then, the national rate has remained fairly constant, but Chicago’s dropped below 26 percent last year, the worst clearance rate for police in any large city in the country, The Post analysis shows.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/as-killings-surge-chicago-police-solve-fewer-homicides/2016/11/05/55e5af84-8c0d-11e6-875e-2c1bfe943b66_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories-2_chicagohomicides-610pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

Sun Sentinel: Flood, mold hit new courthouse

The Sun Sentinel reports that meld, the very courthouse menace that prompted construction of a new, 20-story court tower, is now delaying its opening. In documents and interviews provided in response to a public records request, Broward officials revealed a stunning series of events that soaked the new $197 million tower with rainwater, and then toilet water, and provided the wet conditions for mold and other contaminants to grow. Walls, floors and ceilings were ripped out, repairs made, and independent tests showed air quality returned to normal, top county officials say. But the county’s worries linger. County officials haven’t publicly discussed the floods or mold, but said in an interview that they won’t open the new courthouse until their air quality concerns are put to rest.

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fl-new-courthouse-flood-20161106-story,amp.html

Baltimore Sun: Schools not told bus driver in fatal crash lost driving privileges

The Baltimore Sun reports the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration informed Glenn Chappell in early September that he was "no longer authorized" to drive a school bus and could lose his license unless he provided documentation that a doctor had cleared him to be behind the wheel. But the state agency didn't inform the Baltimore school system that his driving privileges had been suspended. For 40 school days, Chappell continued to ferry 17 homeless and special-needs students across the city. Then this week, Chappell drove his school bus into a transit bus, killing himself and five other adults. The state did not revoke Chappell's commercial driver's license, which prompted an alert to the school system, until Wednesday — the day after the crash. That lag in flagging a potential safety risk has raised questions about how closely authorities monitor drivers of school buses and other commercial vehicles. It was not the first time Chappell's commercial driving privileges had lapsed for lacking proof of good health.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/bs-md-bus-driver-safety-20161105-story.html

Philadelphia Inquirer: No candy-coating lack of charity at Hershey school

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports the charitable Milton Hershey School, gushing with cash, has amassed more assets than every elite private college-prep school in the nation. Its endowment is about 25 percent larger than the University of Pennsylvania's and surpasses all but a half dozen of the country's best-endowed colleges. But few know about this rich school on Homestead Lane that has a one-of-a-kind dilemma: how to spend a $12.5 billion fortune on at-risk children in an isolated campus in central Pennsylvania? The Hershey School's answer: Expend only a tiny fraction of the charity's assets each year and do it lavishly on 2,000 students. The Hershey School's per-student expenditures of $118,400 a year are roughly double the tuition and room and board for Harvard University and nine times the per-pupil expenditures at the Philadelphia School District. Yet even this level of spending fails to dent the school's coffers,.

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/business/Milton_Hershey_Schools_lack_of_charity_isnt_candy-coated.html

Dallas Morning News: Tough-love rehab for poor addicts

The Dallas Morning News reports that when Irving police raided a rundown rental house crammed with dozens of men, they first thought smugglers must be hiding illegal immigrants. After all, some of the residents said they were being held captive, tied up, even beaten. But the site on Penn Street was in fact a shoestring “sober house” for Spanish-speakers seeking help with alcoholism and drug addiction, according to interviews and police records obtained by The Dallas Morning News. At least three unlicensed rehab operations have been investigated recently by officers in Irving and Fort Worth; at two, residents complained of being held against their will. All three offered a cheap place to sleep and 12-step-style treatment, according to police records. Such unlicensed rehabs have long existed in poor neighborhoods but “are surfacing more often,” said Fred Dandoval, executive director for the National Latinio Behavioural Health Association.

Read more: http://www.dallasnews.com/news/irving/2016/11/04/raid-on-overcrowded-irving-house-opens-window-on-tough-love-rehab-for-poor-addicts-1

 

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK  NOV. 1, 2016

 

AP: Trump University staff included drug trafficker, child molester 

 

 The Associated Press reports that while Donald Trump says he hand-picked only the best to teach success at Trump University, dozens of those hired by the company had checkered pasts — including serious financial problems and even convictions for cocaine trafficking or child molestation. An Associated Press investigation identified 107 people listed as speakers and staff on more than 21,000 pages of customer-satisfaction surveys the Republican presidential nominee has released as part of his defense against three lawsuits. Trump and his attorneys have said repeatedly that the surveys show the overwhelming majority of participants were satisfied. However, the suits allege his namesake real-estate seminars were a massive fraud designed to upsell students into buying course packages costing as much as $35,000.

 

Read more: http://nypost.com/2016/10/27/trump-university-staff-included-a-drug-trafficker-child-molester/

 

Los Angeles Times: Top politicians. Unlikely donors. 

 

An investigation by The Los Angeles Times has found more than 100 campaign contributors with a direct or indirect connection to Samuel Leung, a Torrance-based developer who was lobbying public officials to approve a 352-unit apartment complex. Those donors gave more than $600,000 to support U.S. Rep. Janice Hahn (D-Los Angeles), Mayor Eric Garcetti and other L.A.-area politicians between 2008 and 2015, as Leung was seeking city approval for the $72-million development in L.A.’s Harbor Gateway neighborhood, north of the Port of Los Angeles, The Times found. The fundraising effort is a case study in the myriad ways money can flow to City Hall when developers seek changes to local planning rules. The pattern of donations from unlikely sources, some of whom profess to have no knowledge of contributions made in their name, suggests an effort to bypass campaign finance laws designed to make political giving transparent to the public.

 

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-me-seabreeze/#nt=oft12aH-1la1

 

New York Times: Justice Department discouraged move on Clinton e-mail case 

 

The day before FBI director James B. Comey sent a letter to Congress announcing that new evidence had been discovered that might be related to the completed Hillary Clinton email investigation, the Justice Department strongly discouraged the step and told him that he would be breaking with longstanding policy, three law enforcement officials told The New York Times. Senior Justice Department officials did not move to stop him from sending the letter, officials said, but they did everything short of it, pointing to policies against talking about current criminal investigations or being seen as meddling in elections. That Mr. Comey moved ahead despite those protestations underscores the unusual nature of Friday’s revelations, which added a dramatic twist to the final days of the presidential campaign. 

 

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/30/us/politics/comey-clinton-email-justice.html

 

San Diego Union-Tribune: In failing homeless, San Diego stands apart 

 

The San Diego Union-Tribune reports the soaring population of homeless people in San Diego represents a genuine crisis, yet most of the suffering is unnecessary. Far from being a hopeless cause, reducing or even ending homelessness seems quite possible, at least outside of San Diego. Federal statistics tell a story of abject local failure. From 2007 (when counting methods were standardized) to 2015, the nation’s overall number of unsheltered homeless people fell 32 percent to 173,268 people. Over the same eight years, the number increased 24 percent in San Diego County to 4,156. In San Diego, the number of chronically homeless soared 77 percent (to 1,249), while nationwide they fell 30 percent. 

 

Read more:  http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/homelessness/sd-me-homeless-crisis-20161029-htmlstory.html

 

Sun Sentinel: Plan for traffic -- 'Make them suffer' 

 

South Florida's public officials, faced with ever-increasing traffic jams,  have come up with a plan: Make it worse, according to The Sun Sentinel. "Until you make it so painful that people want to come out of their cars, they're not going to come out of their cars," Anne Castro, chair of the Broward County Planning Council, said during a meeting last year. "We're going to make them suffer first, and then we're going to figure out ways to move them after that because they're going to scream at us to help them move." A Sun-Sentinel analysis of South Florida's roads and development plans reveals how planners are creating neighborhoods in urban areas where gridlock is the norm.

 

Read more:  http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fl-traffic-gridlock-20161028-story,amp.html

 

Maine Sunday Telegram: Maine a source for ‘crime guns'

 

The Maine Sunday Telegram says that every year, about 90 guns purchased in Maine turn up at crime scenes, are abandoned or get confiscated by police in Massachusetts. Those guns account for 8 or 9 percent of all “crime guns” recovered by police in Massachusetts – a figure that has held steady for the past decade amid rising and falling crime rates. Gun trafficking from Maine to other states is often cited by backers of Ballot Question 3 as a chief reason to require background checks prior to all private gun sales. Yet advocates on both sides of Question 3 acknowledge that tackling gun trafficking – which is intimately linked with drug trafficking – will require enforcing existing federal laws as well as better educating Maine gun sellers. 

 

Read more: http://www.pressherald.com/2016/10/30/maine-a-source-state-for-crime-guns/

 

Baltimore Sun: Independent voters on rise in Maryland 

 

Maryland's independent voters are the fastest-growing political bloc in the state, a trend expected to accelerate after a polarizing contest between two of the most unpopular presidential candidates in U.S. history, The Baltimore Sun reports. Voters across the country, especially millennials, have increasingly opted out of the two-party system. Maryland has twice as many unaffiliated voters as it did 15 years ago, and the rate of attrition from major parties is growing. Democrats on voter rolls still dwarf Republicans and independents in Maryland, outnumbering each by more than 2-1. But since 2008, the legion of unaffiliated voters has grown 46 percent, a rate more than three times that of either major political party.

 

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/politics/bs-md-independent-voters-20161029-story.html

 

Boston Globe: Law firm 'bonuses' tied to political donations 

 

The Boston Globe reports a pattern of payments — contributions to political candidates by partners of the Thornton Law Firm offset by bonus payments by the firm to those same partners -- was commonplace, according to a review of law firm records by the Spotlight Team and the Center for Responsive Politics, a Washington-based nonprofit that tracks campaign finance data. From 2010 through 2014, partners David C. Strouss and Garrett Bradley, along with founding partner Michael Thornton and his wife, donated nearly $1.6 million to Democratic Party fund-raising committees and a parade of politicians — from Senate minority leader Harry Reid of Nevada to Hawaii gubernatorial candidate David Ige to Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. Over the same span, the lawyers received $1.4 million listed as “bonuses” in Thornton Law Firm records; more than 280 of the contributions precisely matched bonuses that were paid within 10 days.

 

Read more: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2016/10/29/prominent-democratic-law-firm-pays-questionable-bonuses-partners-for-campaign-contributions/GpD5tRQZR7pRe8hwAvQw8N/story.html

 

Minneapolis Star-Tribune: Bumblebee nominated for endangered species list 

 

The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reports the rusty patched bumblebee, once one of the most common bees buzzing about Minnesota’s gardens, could be on the verge of extinction and is likely to be the first of its kind to find a place on the federal endangered species list. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed legal protection for the bee, named for the distinctive orange marking on its back, after an extraordinarily swift decline in its numbers over the past two decades. Like dozens of other pollinators, the rusty patched is suffering from widespread use of chemical pesticides, an increasingly flowerless landscape, disease and climate change. But its decline also illustrates the often unexpected consequences for insects from the way people grow their food. 

 

Read more: http://m.startribune.com/once-common-in-minnesota-rusty-patched-bumblebee-nominated-for-endangered-species-list/399146731/

 

Las Vegas Review-Journal: Drug convictions rely on faulty police tests 

 

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that for nearly three decades, the Metropolitan Police Department and the Clark County district attorney’s office have used cheap chemical field tests to identify illegal drugs and obtains tens of  thousands of convictions. The tests seem simple. Officers placed suspected drugs in a pouch with chemicals and watch for colors to develop. But police and county prosecutors knew the tests were vulnerable to error all along, according to an investigation by ProPublica. Legal substances can create the same colors in the test kits as illegal drugs. Officers sometimes misinterpret results. In 2014, the police crime lab wrote a report arguing that officers should stop using most of the tests. But they did not stop.

        

Read more: http://www.reviewjournal.com/news/politics-and-government/special-investigation-las-vegas-drug-convictions-rely-faulty-police

 

The Democrat and Chronicle: Property tax exemptions -- Unfair share

 

The state of New York is home to 5.7 million parcels of property worth an estimated $2.8 trillion — with a ‘t.’ But when property-tax bills go out each year, nearly a third of that value — about $866 billion — never gets billed, The Democrat and Chronicle reports. Over the past six months, the USA Today Network combed through 17 years of extensive state data on property-tax exemptions at the county, municipal and school district level, examining trends and challenges presented by the state’s patchwork system of granting and enforcing tax breaks. The numbers show alarming growth in the number of completely untaxed properties owned by government and non-profits — from 179,420 in 1999 to 219,602 last year, a 22 percent jump.

 

Read more: http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/2016/10/26/tax-free-properties-new-york/92726532/

 

Columbus Dispatch: Questions about scientist may cast doubt on convictions 

 

Dozens, if not hundreds, of criminal convictions in Ohio could be in jeopardy because a longtime forensic scientist at the state crime lab now stands accused of slanting evidence to help cops and prosecutors build their cases, according to The Columbus Dispatch. The credibility of G. Michele Yezzo, who worked at the Ohio attorney general’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation for more than three decades, has been challenged in two cases in which men were convicted of aggravated murder. One has been freed from prison because of her now-suspect work. A review of her personnel records by The Dispatch shows that colleagues and supervisors raised questions about Yezzo time and again while she tested evidence and testified in an uncounted number of murder, rape and other criminal cases in the state.

 

Read more: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/10/30/ex-bci-scientists-problems-may-cast-doubt-on-dozens-of-cases.html

 

The Tennessean: Sexual harassment in state government

 

The Tennessean says an analysis of data across state government shows at least 460 sexual harassment complaints have been lodged against state employees or contractors since 2010. Although the state has roughly 40,000 employees, that’s still more than one complaint every week for the past six years. A Tennessean review of complaints filed in 44 state departments and commissions reveals the process of investigating workplace sexual harassment and meting out punishments is inconsistent from agency to agency — even though all employees work for the same employer: the state of Tennessee. A review of complaints shows that employees at one agency were given minor sanctions, even for potentially criminal acts, while some workers at other agencies were terminated for verbal harassment. Nearly two-thirds of the investigations into complaints were closed because investigators said they found no wrongdoing.

 

Read more: http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/2016/10/29/sex-harassment-tennessee-government-460-complaints-since-2010/92909966/

 

Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel: Medical staff shortage plagues Milwaukee jails 

 

The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel says the private contractor responsible for medical care at Milwaukee County's jails has failed to meet basic standards of care and staffing mandates, putting inmates' health at risk, newly obtained documents and interviews with former employees show. At one point this spring, a court-appointed watchdog found that 30 percent of all medical jobs at the county's two jails weren't filled, a rate he called "inconsistent with adequate quality of service." Inadequate staffing by Armor Correctional Health Services and poor record-keeping by employees have led to a failure to deliver timely medical treatment, according to the records and former employees. The problems mirror some found recently at two jails staffed by Armor in New York, where the company has been temporarily banned from bidding on contracts as part of a legal settlement.

 

Read more: http://www.jsonline.com/story/news/investigations/2016/10/29/shortage-medical-staff-plagues-milwaukee-jails/92775782/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK   OCT. 25, 2016

AP Exclusive: 'High threat' Texas border busts aren't always 

Drivers in Texas busted for drunken driving, not paying child support or low-level drug offenses are among thousands of "high-threat" criminal arrests being counted as part of a nearly $1 billion mission to secure the border with Mexico, an Associated Press analysis has found. Having once claimed that conventional crime data doesn't fully capture the dangers to public safety and homeland security, the Texas Department of Public Safety classified more than 1,800 offenders arrested near the border by highway troopers in 2015 as "high threat criminals." But not all live up to that menacing label or were anywhere close to the border — and they weren't caught entering the country illegally, as Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, who is Texas' chairman for GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump, has suggested.

Read more: http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_TEXAS_BORDER_CRIME_TXOL-?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

AP: Bayh didn't stay overnight in Indiana condo once in 2010 

The Associated Press reports that Evan Bayh says that his Indianapolis condominium has long been his home, and that he has spent "lots and lots" of time there since deciding to run for his old Senate seat. But a copy of his schedule shows Bayh did not stay overnight there once during his last year in office in 2010. The schedule provided to The Associated Press shows the Democrat spent taxpayer money, campaign funds or let other people pay for him to stay in Indianapolis hotels on the relatively rare occasions he returned from Washington, D.C. During the same period, he spent $3,000 in taxpayer money on what appeared to be job hunting trips to New York, despite the assertion of his campaign that the trips were devoted to official media appearances.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/post-tribune/news/ct-evan-bayh-indiana-condo-2010-20161021-story.html

 Arizona Star: Cartels recruiting drug, people smugglers in bars, high schools

Smuggling arrests in Southern Arizona often conjure up images of Mexican drug cartel foot soldiers sneaking across the border in the dead of night. But a decade of U.S. Customs and Border Protection statistics — and a review of more than 100 federal court cases by the Arizona Daily Star — turn that idea on its head. Actually, most suspected smugglers arrested in Arizona and along the rest of the U.S.-Mexico border either are U.S. citizens or went through the years long process of becoming legal permanent residents. U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents — CBP statistics do not distinguish between the two — accounted for about two-thirds of smuggling arrests made by Tucson Sector Border Patrol agents in fiscal year 2015. Along the entire U.S.-Mexico border, citizens and legal residents accounted for 81 percent of smuggling arrests by agents.

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/local/border/cartels-recruiting-drug-people-smugglers-in-bars-high-schools/article_ab15e460-c798-54ec-a4ab-0a3f052f75ef.html

Washington Post: DEA slowed enforcement while opioid epidemic soared

The Washington Post reported how a decade ago the Drug ­Enforcement Administration launched an aggressive campaign to curb a rising opioid epidemic that was claiming thousands of American lives each year. The DEA began to target wholesale companies that distributed hundreds of millions of highly addictive pills to the corrupt pharmacies and pill mills that illegally sold the drugs for street use. Leading the campaign was the agency’s Office of Diversion Control, whose investigators around the country began filing civil cases against the distributors, issuing orders to immediately suspend the flow of drugs and generating large fines. But the industry fought back. Former DEA and Justice Department officials hired by drug companies began pressing for a softer approach. In early 2012, the deputy attorney general summoned the DEA’s diversion chief to an unusual meeting over a case against two major drug companies. “That meeting was to chastise me for going after industry, and that’s all that meeting was about,” recalled Joseph T. Rannazzisi, who ran the diversion office for a decade before he was removed from his position and retired in 2015.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/the-dea-slowed-enforcement-while-the-opioid-epidemic-grew-out-of-control/2016/10/22/aea2bf8e-7f71-11e6-8d13-d7c704ef9fd9_story.html

Maine Sunday Telegram: Maine sits on millions in federal welfare grant funds

Since 2012, when Gov. Paul LePage and his allies successfully established a 60-month lifetime cap on federal welfare benefits, Maine has drastically reduced both its caseload and its spending. The state still gets the same amount every year under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grant program – about $78 million – but instead of shifting that extra money to other areas designed to assist low-income families with children, Maine has mostly sat on it, The Maine Sunday Telegram reports. In less than five years, the LePage administration has quietly stockpiled $155 million in unspent TANF funds, according to state budget data, an unused balance that has grown at a rate higher than any other state in that time. Maine’s total as a percentage of annual grant funding is among the highest in the country as well.

Read more: http://www.pressherald.com/2016/10/23/maine-sits-on-tens-of-millions-in-federal-welfare-dollars-even-with-extreme-childhood-poverty-on-rise/

Seattle Times: Plan for megaquake “grossly inadequate,” review finds

The Seattle Times says the largest disaster drill ever conducted in the Pacific Northwest found that, despite decades of warnings, the region remains dangerously unprepared to deal with a Cascadia megaquake and tsunami. During the four-day “Cascadia Rising” exercise in June, 23,000 participants grappled with a hypothetical catastrophe that knocked out power, roads and communications and left communities battered, isolated — and with no hope of quick relief. Washington state officials called their own response plans “grossly inadequate,” according to a draft report and records reviewed by The Seattle Times. The report warns that “the state is at risk of a humanitarian disaster within 10 days” of the quake.

Read more: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/washington-states-plan-for-megaquake-grossly-inadequate-review-finds/

 Houston Chronicle: Schools push students out of special education

The Houston Chronicle reports that few days before school began in Laredo, Texas, in 2007, district administrators called an emergency staff meeting. The Texas Education Agency had determined that they had too many students in special education, the administrators announced, and they had come up with a plan: Remove as many kids as possible. The staffers did as they were told, and during the school year, the Laredo Independent School District purged its rolls, discharging nearly a third of its special education students, according to district data. More than 700 children were forced out of special education and moved back into regular education. Only 78 new students entered services. The story illustrates how some schools across Texas have ousted children with disabilities from needed services in order to comply with an agency decree that no more than 8.5 percent of students should obtain specialized education.

Minneapolis Star Tribune: Authorities fail to charge rapist, student fights back

The bite marks and bruises were still fresh on Abby Honold’s body when she learned that the man who had raped her had been released from jail, The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports. The 19-year-old University of Minnesota junior did everything a rape victim was supposed to do. After she escaped, she immediately called 911. She went to a hospital for an exam. She reported everything that happened to her to the police. She agonized as she asked herself: How could there be no charges? What she didn’t know was that there had been more than 1,000 sex assaults reported since 2010 to the Aurora Center, the school’s rape prevention and victim advocacy department, according to a Star Tribune review of the center’s reports. Yet, according to the Aurora Center’s director, Katie Eichele, the total number of rapists who had been prosecuted was zero.

Read more: http://www.startribune.com/after-authorities-did-not-charge-her-rapist-u-student-fought-back/398051931/

Los Angeles Times: Thousands of soldiers forced to repay enlistment bonuses

The California National Guard, short of troops to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan a decade ago, enticed thousands of soldiers with bonuses of $15,000 or more to reenlist and go to war. Now the Pentagon is demanding the money back, The Los Angeles Times reports. Nearly 10,000 soldiers, many of whom served multiple combat tours, have been ordered to repay large enlistment bonuses — and slapped with interest charges, wage garnishments and tax liens if they refuse — after audits revealed widespread overpayments by the California Guard at the height of the wars last decade. Investigations have determined that lack of oversight allowed for widespread fraud and mismanagement by California Guard officials under pressure to meet enlistment targets.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-national-guard-bonus-20161020-snap-story.html

Denver Post: Train design questions causing travel delays raised in 2013

The Denver Post reports officials with the Regional Transportation District raised questions about a contractor’s design of the A-Line’s electric system as early as 2013, three years before the high-profile train to the airport suffered the first of several power-related outages during its first months of operation. Most prominent among the stoppages on the University of Colorado A-Line was a seven-hour shutdown on May 24 caused by a reported lightning strike that severed a critical electric wire and resulted in a dramatic evacuation of passengers atop a bridge. One RTD higher-up expressed exasperation at efforts by Denver Transit Partners, the private contractor on the project, to avoid responsibility for the incident by filing a “force majeure” — or act of God — claim that the strike was unforeseeable and thus unavoidable. Greg Straight, RTD FasTracks Eagle P3 project director, wrote in an e-mail the day after the outage that RTD had long ago urged Denver Transit to run a static wire above the overhead catenary system — the pole-mounted electric propulsion system for the train — to help shield the lines from lightning.

Read more: http://www.denverpost.com/2016/10/21/rtd-a-line-design-delays-lightning-issues/

Sun Sentinel: Stricter scholarship requirements hit poor, minorities

Tens of thousands of Florida’s poorest students are finding it harder to afford college because of tougher qualifications for the state’s Bright Futures scholarship, The Sun Sentinel reports. The academic scholarship was created in 1997 to keep the state’s top students in Florida schools. But the legislature voted in 2011 to increase the required scores on ACT and SAT tests, fearing out-of-control costs caused by standards they considered too easy.  Since then, the number of freshmen receiving the scholarship has dropped by about half, but the changes have hit hardest among those with the greatest need, according to a Sun-Sentinel analysis of Education Department data, including information from about 100 South Florida high schools.

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/education/91753780-132.html

Honolulu Advertiser: Options for primary care doctors are shrinking

The Honolulu Advertiser says nearly a third of Oahu’s primary care doctors are no longer accepting new patients. Many patients are left in limbo s their doctors retire, decline patients on Medicare or Medicaid – the government health insurance program for seniors and low income residents – or are unwilling to take on those with complicated medical problems due to new payment models that penalize providers for poor patient outcomes. A total of 145 of Oahu’s 463 primary care physicians have stopped taking new patients regardless of insurance coverage, according to a study by Crown Care LLC, a Honolulu patient advocacy company. In addition,. 72 primary care doctors, or 16 percent, are accepting only privately insured patients.

Des Moines Register: Iowa schools have millions of dollars they can’t spend

Iowa school districts are sitting on more than $145 million in funding that frustrated superintendents say they can't spend because of legislative restrictions, according to The Des Moines Register. The earmarked money has built up in dozens of funds over the years, growing from $130 million in 2013, according to a Des Moines Register review of state data. Now, education officials are lobbying to loosen the spending restrictions so they can use the money where they say it is needed most, rather than watching the categorized accounts build up year after year while they scramble to find funding in other areas. "It doesn’t make much sense to have this money sitting in banks around the state," said Mary Ellen Miller, a member of the Iowa Board of Education. "Clearly, it's time to look at it."

Read more: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/education/2016/10/22/iowa-schools-have-millions-socked-away-why-arent-they-spending/91562688/

Courier-Journal: Yuck! Louisville still has $943M sewer problem

A decade after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet forced a court-approved, 19-year plan to clean up Jefferson County's wastewater system, a Courier-Journal analysis has found that while much progress has been made, Louisville is still dumping huge volumes of untreated sewage into waterways. In a series of articles, the CJ examines local Metropolitan Sewer District data on spills since 2005 and other records. Among other findings, MSD has stopped spills at some 340 locations, but records show that as much as 5.8 billion gallons of raw sewage may have poured into area waterways in 2015, due to heavy rainfall. That’s the most since at least 2012. Cleanup costs are projected to climb to $943 million, an 11 percent increase over the $850 million previously estimated, as MSD faces a quick turnaround on a new round of expensive and complicated construction jobs

Read more: http://www.courier-journal.com/story/tech/science/environment/2016/10/22/yuck-louisville-still-has-943m-sewer-problem/87721810/

Maine Sunday Telegram: State doesn’t know if school employees are qualified

The Maine Sunday Telegram says state education officials don’t know whether every employee who works with Maine students – from teachers to bus drivers – has passed a criminal background check or is properly credentialed. To ensure their employees are qualified and safe to work with children, local schools rely on an antiquated, paper-based system that has errors. Districts trying to hire employees regularly experience delays of more than a month when trying to determine whether there is proper certification. The certification process for the 34,811 public school employees in Maine has been under scrutiny since April, when an education technician in SAD 6 was charged with sexually assaulting a student. The charges were later dismissed because Zachariah Sherburne left the job before having sex with the student, but the Maine Sunday Telegram/Portland Press Herald learned that Sherburne did not hold any credentials despite already being employed in another district, SAD 55, before he worked at SAD 6.

Read more: http://www.pressherald.com/2016/10/23/are-your-schools-employees-qualified-the-state-doesnt-know/

Orlando Sentinel: Vets find military records often embellished

The Orlando Sentinel reports Groveland mayoral candidate George Rosario posted a picture on his campaign's Facebook page of himself wearing a hat declaring him "Purple Heart Combat Veteran." His campaign website also said he had been awarded two Bronze Stars in addition to a Purple Heart while serving in the Army. The problem is, Rosario doesn't have a Purple Heart, which is awarded to soldiers who were killed or injured in battle, nor a Bronze Star, awarded to soldiers who showed heroic or meritorious achievement — let alone two. The claims — which Rosario's campaign manager blamed on "miscommunication" — were spotted recently by a retired Army veteran who spends his free time catching people he believes are guilty of so-called "stolen valor." Embellishing one's military service is becoming more and more common nationwide, said Mike Vitale of Clermont, who met with Rosario about the misrepresentations, which have since been removed the candidate's website.

Read more: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/lake/os-groveland-stolen-valor-20161021-story.html

New York Times: Outside money favor Clinton 2-to-1 over Trump

The New York Times reports that six years after a Supreme Court decision opened vast new channels for money to flow into national elections, Democrats have built the largest and best-coordinated apparatus of outside groups operating in the 2016 presidential campaign, defying expectations that conservative and corporate wealth would dominate the race. A dozen different organizations raised over $200 million through the beginning of October and since May have spent more than $110 million on television, digital, and radio ads in support of Hillary Clinton, according to records filed with the Federal Election Commission through Thursday, Oct. 20. The handful of organizations backing Donald J. Trump have raised less than half that amount, a steep dive from four years ago, when wealthy Republicans poured hundreds of millions of dollars into groups backing the Republican nominee Mitt Romney.

Read more: http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/10/23/us/politics/clinton-trump-gop-money.html

The Oregonian: University gained many students and a fed investigation

Concordia University now bestows more Master of Education degrees than any other public or private nonprofit school in the country, thanks to a popular online teaching program that helped quadruple the college's revenues in five years, The Oregonian reports. The meteoric growth came at a price to Concordia. The small Christian school has paid more than $160 million to a private contractor hired to handle aspects of the online graduate degree program. Students know little about the Silicon Valley company or its outsized role. Concordia and HotChalk Inc. drew rebuke last year after the U.S. Education Department concluded a two-year investigation into their relationship. A federal prosecutor said the arrangement appeared to violate laws that keep colleges from paying incentives for recruitment, or from outsourcing more than half an educational program to an unaccredited party.

Read more: 

http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2016/10/concordia_gained_thousands_of_new_students_--_and_a_federal_inquiry.html

Austin American-Statesman: Texas’ Hispanic population underrepresented

The Austin American-Statesman reports a first-of-its-kind analysis has found deep patterns of underrepresentation of the state’s fast growing Hispanic population on city councils and commissioners courts across Texas. More than 1.3 million Hispanics in Texas live in cities or counties with no Hispanic representation on their city council or commissioners court. The disparities remain high even when accounting for noncitizens. The imbalance is especially acute at the highest levels of local government. In a state where Hispanics make up 38 percent of the population, only about 10 percent of Texas mayors and county judges are Hispanic. In the halls of county government, Latino representation has largely stagnated over the past two decades. In 1994, Latinos made up 10 percent of county commissioner positions; today, the percentage has inched up just slightly to 13 percent — even though the state’s Hispanic population nearly doubled over that time.

Read more: http://projects.statesman.com/news/latino-representation/

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