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Watchdog Reporting

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Feb. 14, 2018

Houston Chronicle: Business along Texas border fear future without NAFTA

The Houston Chronicle reports that despite the international border, El Paso and its Mexican neighbor, Ciudad Juarez, have knitted themselves into a single, interdependent economy, especially since 1994, when the North American Free Trade Agreement lowered barriers to trade between the United States, Mexico and Canada. As trucks owned by Erives and other local companies carry billions of dollars in merchandise in long, lumbering lines across the border, at least one in every four jobs in El Paso can be traced to manufacturing plants in Juarez. But the fate of this link between Mexican factories and Texas companies hinges on fraught negotiations to update NAFTA, scheduled to resume in Mexico City later this month. Businesses on both sides of the border are increasingly worried that President Donald Trump will follow through on his threat to pull the United States out of the treaty, undermining the free flow of goods and services that has sustained them for more than two decades.

Read more: https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/In-Texas-border-economy-fears-of-going-belly-12564578.php

Oregonian: Low vaccination rates put some charter schools at risk for measles

The Oregonian reports that many charter schools in Oregon have such low student vaccination rates for measles that they'd be at risk if the bug – once declared eliminated in the United States – infected anyone in their school. An analysis by The Oregonian/OregonLive shows that nearly 65 percent of the state's public charter schools lack what scientists call herd immunity against measles, meaning not enough children are immunized to prevent the disease from sweeping through their immediate community. Those charter schools serve nearly 13,000 students across the state, from Portland to Grants Pass and Silverton to Baker City. A much smaller percentage of traditional public schools fall into the same category, but they have more students, so the potential exposure is greater. Just over 60,000 students attend those schools, also spread across the state. The risk worries health officials. Measles is highly contagious, potentially fatal and has made a resurgence in recent years.

Read more: http://www.oregonlive.com/health/index.ssf/2018/02/low_vaccination_rates_put_oreg.html

New York Times: Kentucky rushes to remake Medicaid, other states to follow

The New York Times reports that with approval from the Trump administration fresh in hand, Kentucky is rushing to roll out its first-in-the-nation plan to require many Medicaid recipients to work, volunteer or train for a job — even as critics mount a legal challenge to stop it on the grounds that it violates the basic tenets of the program. At least eight other Republican-led states are hoping to follow — a ninth, Indiana, has already won permission to do so — and some want to go even further by imposing time limits on coverage. Such restrictions are central to Republican efforts to profoundly change Medicaid, the safety net program that has provided free health insurance to tens of millions of low-income Americans for more than 50 years. The ballooning deficits created by the budget deal that President Trump signed into law Friday and the recent tax bill are likely to add urgency to the party’s attempts to wring savings from entitlement programs.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/10/health/kentucky-medicaid-work-requirement.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

Boston Globe: Look at the arrest record of a commuter rail engineer

The Boston Globe reports Roberto Ronquillo III was so drunk that August night in 2012 that his girlfriend begged him to let her out of the car. Instead, Roberto Ronquillo III drove on until his gray BMW veered up onto the sidewalk of Commonwealth Avenue and smashed into a parked car, a witness told police. Then, he drove off, but police found him a few blocks away, passed out in the driver’s seat with the engine still running.

Within days, Ronquillo went back to work — learning to drive trains for the MBTA commuter rail. The next month, he was certified as a professional train engineer. Ronquillo, 35, has a long, notably poor driving record — printed out, it exceeds 80 pages — including multiple stops for drunken driving and 10 license suspensions. But that didn’t prevent him from working as a full-time engineer for almost four years on a commuter rail system that carries more than 100,000 people daily. His most serious violations apparently went undetected by rail operators, raising questions about whether the vetting process for engineers is rigorous enough.

Read more: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/02/10/how-judge-son-got-commuter-rail-engineer-despite-multiple-drunken-driving-charges/F31PjlwMLSMWGJMvJyY81J/story.html

Maine Sunday Telegram: Maine sees worrisome increase in sex diseases

The Maine Sunday Telegram reports sexually transmitted diseases are climbing at an alarming pace in Maine and across the country, especially common bacterial infections like chlamydia and gonorrhea, threatening the long-term health of thousands of Mainers and millions of Americans. Chlamydia cases climbed to 4,551 in 2017, according to the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, compared to 2,586 cases in 2010, a 76 percent increase. The cases have been rising steadily every year. Meanwhile, gonorrhea cases rose sharply in 2017 to 577, after 451 cases in 2016, a 28 percent increase. There were 162 gonorrhea cases in 2010. Syphilis cases also increased, from 48 in 2016 to 84 in 2017, an 83 percent increase. In one bright spot, HIV-positive cases declined from 47 in 2016 to 32 last year, down 47 percent. The overall trends are worrisome to Maine public health experts, who are puzzled by the increases. Sexually transmitted diseases are also on the rise across the United States.

Read more: https://www.pressherald.com/2018/02/11/maine-sees-worrisome-increase-in-sexually-transmitted-diseases/

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Georgians now immersed in health care changes

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that on Jan. 1, the Washington politics roiling health insurance hit home for Georgians. Overnight, policyholders on Georgia’s individual market saw their premiums spike about 50 percent. Blue Cross stopped insuring individuals in metro Atlanta and Columbus. The ones who bought new insurance were forced into health management organizations. Others just didn’t buy insurance. Insurers, analysts and health care advocates warned all lst year that the changes coming from Congress and the White House would result in trouble for patients. For many people, it did. Patients across the country and in Georgia are seeing momentous shifts in the 2018 individual market. They’re mostly driven by money. Among the Georgians trying to ensure coverage for their families on the individual market, there have been winners and losers — and some who left the playing field in search of a new game.

Read more: http://politics.myajc.com/news/state--regional-govt--politics/georgians-now-immersed-changes-health-insurance/cs8AQNA7ObCivanxndnhFK/

Miami Herald: Travelers keep falling for “free’ cruise schemes

The Miami Herald reports nearly everyone is familiar with the call: A too-good-to-be-true offer for a “free” cruise, promising a stress-free Caribbean getaway — as long as you BUY NOW. But it’s when would-be travelers actually start to look at the details of their “free” vacation that things can get messy. Available dates may be severely limited. The seller may try to add on a hotel stay — for a price. Travelers may find out they’ll need to first sit through a timeshare presentation or pay government taxes or port fees — despite the prohibition by Florida law that the only allowable charge for a prize is the cost of delivery. And those who cancel may find getting a refund to be nearly impossible. Still, many travelers bite, lured by a steeply marked-down vacation. All too often, such “free” travel offers can be deceptive schemes perpetrated by Florida-based companies trying to piggyback on South Florida’s status as the Cruise Capital of the World.

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/tourism-cruises/article198538339.html

Sun Sentinel: For cash and prostitutes, agent helped drug lord avoid arrest

The Sun Sentinel reports that when a federal agent by the name of Christopher Ciccione decided to sell out to a powerful Cali cartel drug lord, the price of his integrity was surprisingly cheap. For $20,000 in cash bribes, a sex party with Colombian prostitutes at a Marriott hotel in Bogota, a Rolex watch, cocktails and an expensive dinner, the former Homeland Security Investigations agent altered criminal records and told bold-faced lies to his colleagues, bosses and federal prosecutors. The former South Florida-based agent’s corruption paid off hugely for his cartel buddy. He succeeded in getting federal drug-trafficking charges dropped against Jose Bayron Piedrahita Ceballos in one of the biggest cocaine-smuggling cases in U.S. history. The drug lord, Piedrahita, will likely never face justice on the dismissed charges in the U.S., prosecutors said. But he was recently arrested in Colombia and may be extradited to face conspiracy, corruption, bribery and fraud charges linked to the agent’s prosecution.

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fl-reg-agent-helped-cali-drug-lord-20180208-story.html

Washington Post: Is Kraton a natural pain remedy or an addictive killer?

The Washington Post reports kratom, an herbal supplement, is rapidly rising in popularity as a readily available pain remedy that is safer than traditional opioids (such as oxycodone), an effective addiction withdrawal aid and a pleasurable recreational tonic. Kratom also is assailed as a dangerous and unregulated drug that can be purchased on the Internet, a habit-forming substance that authorities say can result in opioid-like abuse and death. Now, the compound is at the center of an acrimonious battle on social media, in federal agencies and at all levels of government — a fight over whether kratom could help curb the nation’s opioid epidemic or make it dramatically worse. The Drug Enforcement Administration is weighing whether to place kratom, which comes from a leafy Southeast Asian tree, in the same category of illegal drugs as heroin. It’s the second time the agency has tried to curb access to kratom, delaying a final decision in 2016 after an outcry from the public, dozens of members of Congress and a demonstration at the White House.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/kratom-is-hailed-as-a-natural-pain-remedy-assailed-as-an-addictive-killer-the-us-wants-to-treat-it-like-heroin/2018/02/10/aaf4bf7c-077e-11e8-b48c-b07fea957bd5_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories_kratom-620pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.d43944c9018b

Hartford Courant: Police to get drones, but city has no rules

The Hartford Courant asks how far can law enforcement go in flying drones over public protests or rallies? In Hartford, there are no rules. And while police are still months away from using the machines to fight crime, concerns about them have started to mount. Skeptics fear the devices will have a chilling effect on protests, that they could undermine Hartford’s reputation as a welcoming city for immigrants and that they would violate people’s privacy. Days after learning that Hartford had received a state grant to purchase two drones – and as many as 200 new cameras – the head of Connecticut’s American Civil Liberties Union authored an internet post on the pitfalls of increased surveillance. The flood of new cameras, paired with the drones, “could be a nightmare for anyone who cares about safety, justice, equality and freedom,” executive director David McGuire wrote.

Read more: http://www.courant.com/community/hartford/hc-news-hartford-drones-policy-20180206-story.html

Arizona Daily Star: Drug-smuggling sentences vary wildly along Mexico border

The Arizona Daily Star reports prison terms for drug smugglers vary drastically depending on where arrests are made, federal data show. Courts in the District of Arizona hand down far shorter sentences on average than in other districts, particularly in the Southern District of Texas where defense lawyers say federal prosecutors draw a harder line with plea offers. Arizona’s federal courts issued 10 times more prison sentences for conspiracy to smuggle drugs, one of the most-common charges used along the length of the border, than South Texas courts in fiscal 2017. But average prison terms for conspiracy charges were nearly eight times longer in South Texas than in Arizona, according to federal data compiled by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University, which has a longstanding public records request with the Department of Justice and other agencies.

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/local/drug-smuggling-sentences-vary-wildly-along-mexico-border/article_a45fca2d-b468-5a92-8072-55f6d073f2b1.html

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Feb. 7, 2018

Indianapolis Star: Buyers who fuel the sex trade seldom held accountable

On the day she met Marcus Thompson, the girl later told the FBI, she had been ready to leap from a bridge to end her life. She was only 15, pregnant and alone on the streets. And in this wounded child, Thompson saw a means to make money. He promised that if she left her small Illinois town with him, he would make her a model. Grasping for hope, she climbed into his truck.
But the promise was a lie. Instead, in the summer of 2015, Thompson and his wife, Robin, forced the girl on a nightmarish six-week trek across the southern United States. Photographed in suggestive poses and marketed online, she was sold out of hotel rooms and truck stops to any man with the money and the desire to buy sex. In this case, the victim was rescued and provided with treatment. The traffickers who exploited her pleaded guilty and were sent to prison. But what of the men who paid to rape this child? What consequences did they suffer?
Not a single one was ever charged. That same breach of justice is the norm in thousands of trafficking cases. About 10,000 children a year suffer the horrors of commercial sexual exploitation in the United States. Globally, according to the International Labour Organization, buyers pay to abuse more than 1 million children a year. Yet the buyers are seldom held accountable.

Read more: https://www.indystar.com/story/opinion/columnists/tim-swarens/2018/01/30/exploited-human-trafficking-project-who-buys-child-sex-otherwise-ordinary-men/949512001/

Los Angeles Times: Homeless caught in vicious cycle

Los Angeles police found Reed Segovia slumped in a folding chair near the Venice boardwalk early one spring morning in 2016 and shook him awake. The officers handed the homeless street artist a ticket for sleeping on the sidewalk. Three months later, LAPD officers were citing Segovia again when they discovered an unpaid ticket for sleeping on the beach. This time, they handcuffed him, loaded him into a squad car and took him to jail. L.A. officials have denounced "criminalizing" homelessness. But as Los Angeles struggles with a growing homelessness crisis, arrests of homeless people have gone up significantly, a Times analysis of police data shows. And the most common offense — the one Segovia was arrested for — was failure to appear in court for an unpaid citation. Officers made 14,000 arrests of homeless people in the city in 2016, a 31% increase over 2011, the Times analysis found. The rise came as LAPD arrests overall went down 15%. Two-thirds of those arrested were black or Latino, and the top five charges were for nonviolent or minor offenses.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/local/politics/la-me-homeless-arrests-20180204-story.html

Orange County Register: Students in crisis

Health science and policy major Nayana Bhaskar was about midway through her sophomore year at UC Irvine, when she felt herself falling apart. She’d always been a driven student, landing a 4.0 grade point average in her first quarter. She relished intellectual conversations with professors and friends. She joined school clubs. But by her second year, that initial excitement of college was waning. In its place, feelings of despair and isolation were seeping in — feelings strong enough that, eventually, they proved overwhelming. Bhaskar, who grew up in Orange County, had struggled with similar sensations on and off since middle school. But this time, distanced from the hometown friends she once confided in, the feelings were more profound.

She began skipping classes. When she did go to lectures, she was so filled with anxiety that she had to leave. “I was like, I need to do something. I have no choice but to seek help.” Thousands of people Bhaskar’s age are making similar choices. Across Southern California and nationwide, unprecedented numbers of college students are seeking counseling for mental and emotional difficulties. In a 2013 survey by the RAND Corp., almost 1 in 5 California college students reported psychological distress within the prior 30 days, a rate of crisis that’s more than five times higher than the general population. Nationally, between 2009 and 2015, campus counseling centers saw a 30 percent jump in the number of students seeking help, according to Penn State’s Center for Collegiate Mental Health.

Read more: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/04/students-in-crisis-on-campus-record-numbers-seek-mental-health/

Chicago Tribune: Pollution-related penalties fall under Republican governor

Well before the Trump administration began shifting responsibility for enforcing environmental laws to the states, Illinois already had slowed down the policing of air and water pollution under Gov. Bruce Rauner. A Tribune analysis of enforcement data shows that since the Republican businessman took office in 2015, penalties sought from Illinois polluters have dropped to $6.1 million — about two-thirds less than the inflation-adjusted amount demanded during the first three years under Rauner’s two predecessors, Democrats Pat Quinn and Rod Blagojevich.

Rauner’s enforcement record during the past three years also pales in comparison to the final year in office of the state’s last Republican governor, George Ryan. Adjusted for inflation, the penalties sought since Rauner took office are less than half the amount demanded as Ryan wrapped up his four-year term in 2002.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/watchdog/ct-met-rauner-epa-enforcement-20180123-story.html

Indianapolis Star: Police shootings don’t get required review

The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department is supposed to conduct a review every time an officer shoots at somebody. But the Indianapolis Star found that in 19 incidents over two years, including in at least six fatal shootings, that never happened. … No one in IMPD leadership seems to know why these particular 19 shootings were never reviewed. A few others were reviewed at the time. All of the shootings, which happened in 2015 and 2016, were investigated by criminal detectives when necessary to ensure no crimes were committed, IMPD says.

But the cases lacked a crucial step of oversight: the convening of a firearms review board, comprised of three commanders and two other officers. Policy requires the boards to look through both criminal and internal investigations before delivering a report to the desk of the chief. IMPD chiefs use that report — and the board members' findings — to determine whether an officer's use of force meets standards set by the department. Falling short of those standards can result in a firing or other discipline.

Read more: https://www.indystar.com/story/news/crime/2018/02/04/impd-violated-policy-failed-review-19-police-shootings/1082235001/

Detroit Free Press: Banking on benefactors

Executives at some of the nation's top investment firms donated hundreds of millions of dollars to the University of Michigan while the university invested as much as $4 billion in those companies' funds, a Detroit Free Press investigation found. More than $400 million of that amount was sent into funds managed by three alumni who advise the university on its investments. Critics worry Michigan’s approach of investing with some of its top donors, who also help guide the university's nearly $11-billion endowment, creates a conflict. … Thousands of miles from the Ann Arbor campus, the university's Investment Advisory Committee last May joined top university officials, including its chief financial officer, at dinner for 22 inside the historic bay-view home of San Francisco technology investor Sanford Robertson. The next morning, the group reconvened for a closed-door university briefing and strategy session at the Four Seasons hotel. Records show the University of Michigan invested in companies at the time owned or co-led by at least four of its nine current committee members, including Robertson. On top of working capital, their companies, based on industry practice, likely charged millions of dollars in fees and profit-sharing as a price for managing the university's money; exact figures remain secret.

Read more: https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2018/02/01/university-michigan-endowment-donor-funds/1066143001/

New York Times: Molested as FBI case plodded for a year

For more than a year, an F.B.I. inquiry into allegations that Lawrence G. Nassar, a respected sports doctor, had molested three elite teenage gymnasts followed a plodding pace as it moved back and forth among agents in three cities. The accumulating information included instructional videos of the doctor’s unusual treatment methods, showing his ungloved hands working about the private areas of girls lying facedown on tables. But as the inquiry moved with little evident urgency, a cost was being paid. The New York Times has identified at least 40 girls and women who say that Dr. Nassar molested them between July 2015, when he first fell under F.B.I. scrutiny, and September 2016, when he was exposed by an Indianapolis Star investigation. Some are among the youngest of the now-convicted predator’s many accusers — 265, and counting. … The F.B.I. declined to answer detailed questions about the speed and nature of its investigation, or to provide an official who might put the case in context. Instead, it issued a 112-word statement asserting that the sexual exploitation of children “is an especially heinous crime,” and that “the safety and well-being of our youth is a top priority for the F.B.I.”

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/03/sports/nassar-fbi.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Feb. 1, 2018

New York Times: The Follower Factory

The real Jessica Rychly is a Minnesota teenager with a broad smile and wavy hair. She likes reading and the rapper Post Malone. When she goes on Facebook or Twitter, she sometimes muses about being bored or trades jokes with friends. Occasionally, like many teenagers, she posts a duck-face selfie. But on Twitter, there is a version of Jessica that none of her friends or family would recognize. While the two Jessicas share a name, photograph and whimsical bio — “I have issues” — the other Jessica promoted accounts hawking Canadian real estate investments, cryptocurrency and a radio station in Ghana. The fake Jessica followed or retweeted accounts using Arabic and Indonesian, languages the real Jessica does not speak. While she was a 17-year-old high school senior, her fake counterpart frequently promoted graphic pornography, retweeting accounts called Squirtamania and Porno Dan. All these accounts belong to customers of an obscure American company named Devumi that has collected millions of dollars in a shadowy global marketplace for social media fraud. Devumi sells Twitter followers and retweets to celebrities, businesses and anyone who wants to appear more popular or exert influence online. Drawing on an estimated stock of at least 3.5 million automated accounts, each sold many times over, the company has provided customers with more than 200 million Twitter followers, a New York Times investigation found.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/27/technology/social-media-bots.html

Arizona Daily Star: School district blacklisted hundreds of former workers

Hundreds of former employees of Arizona's second largest school district by enrollment were blacklisted from ever working for the district again, despite never having serious disciplinary issues on their employment records, the Arizona Daily Star reports. And it's unclear why many of the ex-workers for the Tucson Unified School District were ever put on a long-rumored blacklist or who put them on it. Many of the former employees were never told they were blacklisted, the paper reported. District officials say the former employees were put on the blacklist because of "personality clashes" with supervisors, poor evaluation scores and using all of their vacation time. None of those infractions are grounds for firing or blacklisting, the newspaper reported. The district recently publicly acknowledged for the first time that it kept a secret "Do Not Hire List" that dated back two decades and contained as many as 1,400 entries.

Newly-hired district Superintendent Gabriel Trujillo ordered an audit of the list, which found only 516 people had been justifiably blacklisted. Those people had either been fired for cause or had resigned and signed a separation agreement stating they would not be eligible to work in the district again. The other roughly 900 employees had been wrongly blacklisted.

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/local/long-rumored-tusd-blacklist-revealed-many-on-it-for-little/article_5d49cd2b-5c32-54a8-a287-01ee62c82371.html

Modesto Bee: Sexual harassment costs state millions

Four young men who were locked in a youth correctional facility in Southern California accused a male staff counselor of coercing them into sex acts in exchange for contraband and special treatment. The cost to taxpayers to settle their lawsuit: $10 million. At California State University, Fullerton, a female student in her 20s reported that her professor encouraged her to drink whiskey with him in his office and advised her to masturbate during the week to relax, then report back to him on her progress. The cost? The CSU system paid $92,000 to settle her case, while the student became fearful and anxious after the encounters and her “quality of life declined,” her lawsuit contended. And at California State Prison-Corcoran, which has housed the likes of Juan Corona and Charles Manson until his recent death, a female correctional officer said a fellow guard repeatedly made explicit sexual comments, stared at her breasts and crotch, touched her with his hands and pelvis and called her at home,according to court documents and interviews. The state settled her case for $750,000. While public attention has been riveted on sexual harassment allegations in the California Legislature, with sordid charges and counter-charges swirling around a handful of lawmakers, the issue and its related costs extend far beyond the Capitol dome.

Read more: http://www.modbee.com/news/article196659999.html

Hartford Courant: Addiction on the job

Out of work and addicted to the anti-anxiety medication Klonopin, Heather Delaney, a licensed practical nurse from Stratford, checked herself into Bridgeport Hospital in 2011 when she could no longer handle withdrawal without medical help. After a brief hospitalization following a suicide attempt the previous fall, Delaney spent two horrific months on her own in the throes of withdrawal. The corners of her eyes felt “chapped,” and “it felt like somebody had wrapped me up in a scratchy blanket of needles,” said Delaney, who had given up her nursing license after being caught altering her Klonopin prescription. Sara Kaiser, an LPN living in Manchester, stole morphine from the nursing homes where she worked and was addicted to heroin from age 18 to 24. She spent time homeless and in prison, ultimately going through 14 rehab programs before getting sober in 2010. Both were disciplined by the state Board of Examiners for Nursing, but after years of hard work, they are among 18 nurses who have gotten their licenses back in the past three years. Delaney, 40, now sober and living in Oxford, is a certified nursing assistant who is looking for a nursing job. Kaiser, 32, works in addiction recovery. … A Conn. Health I-Team analysis of the board’s cases between 2015 and 2017 shows that drug use is common among the disciplined nurses in Connecticut. Of its 282 cases, 82 percent involved substance abuse: 23 percent related to alcohol, and 77 percent were drug-related. More than 64 percent of those drug-related cases—113—involved opioids, including oxycodone, morphine, heroin and Fentanyl.

Read more: http://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-nurses-substance-abuse-suspensions-20180123-story.html

Miami Herald: Citizenship census question floated

The Department of Justice wants the U.S. Census Bureau to ask people about their citizenship status on the 2020 census, and the additional questioning could lead to an undercount in immigrant-heavy Miami. Undercounting the number of people living in Florida’s most populous county could affect how billions of federal dollars are distributed and diminish the state’s clout in the nation’s capital. The Census Bureau will choose whether or not to include the citizenship status question by March 31, when it finalizes the 2020 questionnaire. “The purpose of the census is simple: collecting appropriate data on the people that reside in our communities so that we can distribute federal resources for the needs of the population,” Miami Republican Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen said in a statement. “Any question, including one regarding citizenship, that could in any way discourage an accurate count, must be omitted.” The Justice Department argued that including the citizenship status question would help it enforce the Voting Rights Act, according to a letter from the DOJ to the Census Bureau obtained by ProPublica.

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/politics-government/article196694919.html

Boston Globe: Theft at nonprofits ‘shockingly common’

A board member for the Somerville Homeless Coalition was reviewing the nonprofit’s annual financial documents in 2015 when he spotted something odd. The forms said the chief operating officer, the No. 2 executive, earned $12,000 more than the organization’s top executive the previous year. Could that really be correct, he asked? Turns out it wasn’t a typo. It was theft.

Somerville Homeless soon discovered that the COO — who handled all the finances — allegedly embezzled approximately $108,000 over 18 months. The charity said he brazenly added some of the money directly into his paycheck — where it showed up on the group’s annual financial forms — used the organization’s credit card for personal expenses, and added his middle-aged son to the group’s health insurance. “The whole thing has been a nightmare,” said Mark Alston-Follansbee, executive director of the Somerville nonprofit, which provides food, shelter, and other assistance to about 2,000 people annually. “The money he stole from us could have prevented 100 families from going homeless.” More than 1,100 tax-exempt organizations nationwide have reported theft, embezzlement, or other major diversions of assets over the past seven years, according to electronic filings with the Internal Revenue Service. And experts say the total number of thefts is almost certainly far higher, because most cases of fraud are either never detected or reported in the digital filings.

Read more: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/01/27/taking-from-charity-employee-theft-shockingly-common-nonprofit-groups/aGzL6qg5JnhkAsAbj7tMkO/story.html

Philadelphia Inquirer: Father. Son. Cellmates.

As the bus rattled toward the State Correctional Institution-Graterford, Jorge Cintron Jr. could barely contain his excitement, a nearly childlike giddiness. Though the journey had been 14 hours, most of it in shackles, he wasn’t close to tired. To the other weary inmates in mustard-yellow “D.O.C.” jumpsuits, what loomed ahead was just another prison: same bars and barbed wire, same bland food, same thin mattresses. But Cintron was about to be with his father, his namesake — the role model he had followed into the drug world, into court on murder charges, and then into prison, their twin life sentences imposed eight years apart. It had been 20 years since he had last seen the man everyone said he took after. “Lil Lolo,” his father’s friends from Philadelphia’s Fairhill section would call him. Now, he was about to come face to face with Jorge Cintron Sr., Lolo himself. “I hadn’t hugged my father in so many years, or heard his voice,” Cintron Jr. said. “It was bittersweet, because we’re both in prison and having to see each other in here.” Since that day in 2011, Cintron Jr., 38, has lived on the same cell block as his father, who is 58. … All around them are inmates who come from the same neighborhoods, the same city blocks or even the same households. … According to one criminologist’s analysis of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, 5 percent of families account for more than 50 percent of all arrests.

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/news/crime/prison-family-life-sentences-mass-incarceration-philadelphia-pennsylvania.html

AP: Hundreds of New Mexico inmates held past parole date

Joleen Valencia had resisted the temptation to count her days to freedom. She had learned inside a New Mexico prison that tracking time only added to the anxiety of serving a two-year drug-trafficking sentence that started in the spring of 2015 — especially after her mother died and granddaughter had been born. She wanted nothing more than to return to her family's home amid mesas on a reservation north of Albuquerque, and to stay clean after recovering from a heroin addiction. But rather than agonize, she kept busy. She worked daily dishwashing shifts, some lasting as long as 12 hours, to earn 10 cents an hour and eventually enough "good time" for what authorities said would be her new parole date: July 13, 2016. "They would tell you, don't count your days, because it's going to make it hard," said Valencia, now 50. But she couldn't resist as her parole date neared. And that made it all the more frustrating when the day came and went. For three more months, Valencia remained incarcerated, one of more than 1,000 inmates identified in New Mexico Corrections Department documents as serving what's known as "in-house parole." Often, those who should be freed are held because they are unable to find or afford suitable housing outside prison. Other times, missing paperwork or administrative backlogs can rob them of the freedom they've earned.

(This report is part of the CJ Project, an initiative to broaden the news coverage of criminal justice issues affecting New Mexico's diverse communities, created by the Asian American Journalists Association with funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. For more information: http://www.aaja.org/cj-project.)

Read more: https://www.abqjournal.com/1125169/hundreds-of-new-mexico-inmates-held-past-parole-date.html

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Jan. 24, 2018

Los Angeles Times: Borrow $5,000, repay $42,000

JoAnn Hesson, sick with diabetes for years, was desperate. After medical bills for a leg amputation and kidney transplant wiped out most of her retirement nest egg, she found that her Social Security and small pension weren’t enough to make ends meet. As the Marine Corps veteran waited for approval for a special pension from the Department of Veterans Affairs, she racked up debt with a series of increasingly pricey online loans. In May 2015, the Rancho Santa Margarita resident borrowed $5,125 from Anaheim lender LoanMe at the eye-popping annual interest rate of 116%. The following month, she borrowed $2,501 from Ohio firm Cash Central at an even higher APR: 183%. “I don’t consider myself a dumb person,” said Hesson, 68. “I knew the rates were high, but I did it out of desperation.” Not long ago, personal loans of this size with sky-high interest rates were nearly unheard of in California. But over the last decade, they’ve exploded in popularity as struggling households — typically with poor credit scores — have found a new source of quick cash from an emerging class of online lenders. … Hesson’s $5,125 loan was scheduled to be repaid over more than seven years, with $495 due monthly, for a total of $42,099.85 — that’s nearly $37,000 in interest.

Read more: http://beta.latimes.com/business/la-fi-installment-loans-20180119-htmlstory.html

Washington Post: At Trump’s inauguration, eager Russian Elites

In the days before Donald Trump’s inauguration, a wealthy Russian pharmaceutical executive named Alexey Repik arrived in Washington, expressing excitement about the new administration. He posted a photo on Facebook of a clutch of inauguration credentials arranged next to a white “Make America Great Again” hat, writing in Russian: “I believe that President Donald Trump will open a new page in American history.” Throughout his trip, Repik had prime access. He wrote on Facebook that he got close enough to the president-elect at a pre-inaugural event to “check the handshake strength of Donald Trump.” He and his wife, Polina Repik, witnessed Trump’s swearing-in from ticketed seats in front of the U.S. Capitol. … The attendance of members of Russia’s elite at Trump’s inauguration was evidence of the high anticipation in Moscow for a thaw in U.S.-Russia relations following a campaign in which Trump stunned U.S. foreign-policy experts by repeatedly praising Russian President Vladi­mir Putin.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/amid-trumps-inaugural-festivities-members-of-russias-elite-anticipated-a-thaw-between-moscow-and-washington/2018/01/20/0d767f46-fb9f-11e7-ad8c-ecbb62019393_story.html?utm_term=.932c21d2b4dd

Miami Herald: Dirty gold, clean cash

When Juan Granda ventured into Peru’s Amazon rainforest to score another illicit load of gold, he boasted that he felt like legendary Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar. “I’m like Pablo coming ... to get the coke,” he told two co-workers in a text message in 2014. A 36-year-old Florida State University graduate who once sold subprime loans, Granda was no cartel kingpin. But his offhand comparison was apt: Gold has become the secret ingredient in the criminal alchemy of Latin American narco-traffickers who make billions turning cocaine into clean cash by exporting the metal to Miami. The previous year, Granda’s employer, NTR Metals, a South Florida precious-metals trading company, had bought nearly $1 billion worth of Peruvian gold supplied by narcos — and Granda and NTR needed more.

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article194187699.html

Idaho Statesman: Health care battery law results in felony charges against patients

Amy Johnson was in the Ada County Jail and didn’t know what she’d done. Two days earlier, Johnson had called a friend to pick her up from work. She has bipolar disorder and felt a manic episode coming on. Colors were getting brighter. Her thoughts ricocheted from one thing to another. She couldn’t sleep. Her friend and boyfriend were ready to help her through it — with written instructions Amy had given them in case this ever happened. But instead of getting well at a psychiatric hospital, the 41-year-old university employee was arrested. She could face up to six years in prison. … Johnson is one of hundreds of Idahoans charged under a law passed in 2014 making battery against health care workers a felony. … A 2014 law was intended to protect those workers. It also had cultural importance — making it clear that healthcare workers are specifically worth defending. But as it made its way through the Idaho Legislature, an exemption for mental illness was removed.

Read more: http://www.idahostatesman.com/news/politics-government/state-politics/article195828984.html

Indianapolis Star: Trump makes first year bountiful for religious right

A year after President Trump moved into the White House, many of the Christian conservatives who helped put him there are counting their blessings. Johnnie Moore, an informal spokesman for the group of evangelicals who advise President Trump, says the administration has “been a dream.” The head of Focus on the Family estimates the administration has taken about 17 actions on the pro-life agenda alone — a tally that Jim Daly said adds up to the greatest gains by an administration since the Supreme Court legalized abortion. And Paula White, the televangelist and spiritual adviser to Trump, calls the president’s first year of accomplishments “absolutely astounding.” It’s not just leaders of the Christian conservative community who think Trump has been delivering on his promises to them — from judicial appointments to policy changes, and from personnel appointments to access to the White House. … Religious conservatives had high hopes for their agenda once Trump chose Christian conservative Mike Pence as his running mate and promised on the campaign trail that the “first priority of my administration will be to preserve and protect our religious liberty.”

Read more: https://www.indystar.com/story/news/politics/2018/01/18/first-year-trump-pence-brings-bountifulbounfifreligious-conservatives-find-much-like-little-criticiz/1041904001/

Des Moines Register: Pay gap remains for state workers

Median pay for women working in Iowa state government is about $5,300 less a year than men, a dollar gap that has changed little over the past decade, a Register analysis has found. In fiscal year 2017, median pay for male government workers was $55,879, about 11 percent more than the $50,537 median for female workers. While the gap in median salaries between the two genders has dropped in the last decade from 15 percent to 11 percent as pay for both rose, the dollar gap remains virtually unchanged. A typical male worker earned $5,476 more than a female worker in 2007 and $5,342 more in 2017. The pay gap is much larger in several university jobs, such as assistant and associate professors and lecturers, where men make 25 percent to 33 percent more than their female co-workers, the Register found. It's an issue that, if left unaddressed, exposes the state to class-action lawsuits, as well as an erosion of talent within its workforce, state and national critics contend.

Read more: https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/investigations/2018/01/21/exclusive-women-workers-iowa-government-earn-5-k-less-median-pay-than-men/1014917001/

New York Times: He fought harassment, then settled own case

Representative Patrick Meehan, a Pennsylvania Republican who has taken a leading role in fighting sexual harassment in Congress, used thousands of dollars in taxpayer money to settle his own misconduct complaint after a former aide accused him last year of making unwanted romantic overtures to her, according to several people familiar with the settlement. A married father of three, Mr. Meehan, 62, had long expressed interest in the personal life of the aide, who was decades younger and had regarded the congressman as a father figure, according to three people who worked with the office and four others with whom she discussed her tenure there.

But after the woman became involved in a serious relationship with someone outside the office last year, Mr. Meehan professed his romantic desires for her — first in person, and then in a handwritten letter — and he grew hostile when she did not reciprocate, the people familiar with her time in the office said. Life in the office became untenable, so she initiated the complaint process, started working from home and ultimately left the job. She later reached a confidential agreement with Mr. Meehan’s office that included a settlement for an undisclosed amount to be paid from Mr. Meehan’s congressional office fund.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/20/us/politics/patrick-meehan-sexual-harassment.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=first-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

Rochester Democrat and Chronicle: Lunch shaming

The cafeteria cashier at Greece Odyssey Academy told David Leonard that his mom needed to add more money to his account, but — typical eighth-grader — he forgot to let her know. He qualified for reduced-price lunch, just 25 cents, so a small deposit would have gone a long way. As it was, though, he went back through the lunch line the following day and got to the register with a hot meal with no money to pay for it. No money, no food, the cashier told him. She took his tray and sent him away empty-handed, according to his mother, without even the peanut butter and jelly sandwich mentioned in the school district's written policy. … Every day in schools across Monroe County, children likely have the same experience as David Leonard, even as districts move to change their policies on 'lunch shaming.'

Read more: https://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/2018/01/19/school-lunch-shaming-what-do-schools-do-when-student-accounts-dont-have-money/1012590001/

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: City’s ‘single stream’ recycling doesn’t quite work

Kyle Winkler follows his gut: he jumps from the back of the hulking blue recycling truck to inspect a plastic “Grandma’s Original Recipes” potato salad container on the curb of Midland Street in Brookline. Inside, the city’s recycling supervisor finds some shriveled cherry tomatoes mixed in with a clump of black dog hair, large enough to fill the entire container. A disposable foil pan sits beside it, cake mashed and stuck to the sides. He declares both items too contaminated to toss into the truck. “We see a lot of, let’s say, situations,” says the driver, Tyrone Wright, 66, of Manchester. Mr. Wright says he doesn’t always have time to scrutinize but employs his “spidey senses” to detect things that are non-recyclable — clamshell take-out containers, porcelain dishes, or yard debris stuffed into blue bags. … Because the city doesn’t require residents to sort recyclables, it means they pay someone else to do so, increasing costs and decreasing the value of the recycling effort. A portion of what you put in the bag ends up in a landfill, on a boat to China, or sitting in a warehouse waiting for prices to improve. And city officials can't say exactly how much of what's collected is actually recycled, or where the recycling goes after city trucks drop it off. Despite the good intentions of household recyclers, several waste experts and recycling industry workers say the city’s program — and American recycling in general — is broken.

Read more: https://newsinteractive.post-gazette.com/recycling/

Appleton Post-Crescent: Wisconsin fumbles fixes for teen suicide

Youth suicide rates have been rising nationwide since 2007. Wisconsin's numbers have been worse than the national average every year.  For the past two years, USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin has been examining the root causes of this rise with a “Kids in Crisis” series. Each suicide triggers the question: How did this happen? Whispers spread. Fingers point. Sometimes another suicide follows. Pursuit of the question can be a debilitating spiral.

But through the fog of grief, there's another question. How do we stop this from happening again?

Read more: http://www.postcrescent.com/story/news/2018/01/18/wisconsin-overlooks-fixes-youth-suicide-its-time-hear-students-pleas/971191001/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Jan. 18, 2018

Arizona Republic: ‘Loophole’ in DACA provokes criticism

Carlos Mundo and Dulce Hernandez were once among the 800,000 young undocumented immigrants temporarily shielded from deportation and granted work permits under former President Barack Obama's DACA program. But while DACA recipients are now anxiously waiting to see if Congress passes legislation allowing them to stay permanently in the U.S. or whether they will once again face possible deportation, Mundo and Hernandez are home free.

They are among a little-known but sizable group of nearly 40,000 DACA recipients who have already obtained green cards. Many of them were able to permanently legalize their status by taking advantage of a provision within Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The provision allowed DACA recipients to travel outside the U.S. and then return legally through what's known as advance parole, which made some DACA recipients eligible to get green cards, an opportunity that otherwise didn't exist for them. … Some critics, among them several Republican lawmakers in Congress, have labeled the advance parole provision a "loophole" they say improperly allowed some DACA recipients to exploit the immigration system to get green cards.

Read more: https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/2018/01/12/loophole-gave-some-dreamers-green-cards-could-complicate-daca-debate/967204001/

Washington Post: 24-year-old helps lead Trump drug policy office

In May 2016, Taylor Weyeneth was an undergraduate at St. John’s University in New York, a legal studies student and fraternity member who organized a golf tournament and other events to raise money for veterans and their families. Less than a year later, at 23, Weyeneth, was a political appointee and rising star at the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the White House office responsible for coordinating the federal government’s multibillion dollar anti-drug initiatives and supporting President Trump’s efforts to curb the opioid epidemic. Weyeneth would soon become deputy chief of staff. His brief biography offers few clues that he would so quickly assume a leading role in the drug policy office, a job recently occupied by a lawyer and a veteran government official. Weyeneth’s only professional experience after college and before becoming an appointee was working on Trump’s presidential campaign.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/meet-the-24-year-old-trump-campaign-worker-appointed-to-help-lead-the-governments-drug-policy-office/2018/01/13/abdada34-f64e-11e7-91af-31ac729add94_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_drugnominee-835pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.f0bed6ea29a3

Honolulu Star-Advertiser: Officials vow changes after alert system goes awry

After people across the state were told for months to prepare for a possible nuclear attack from North Korea, for 38 terrifying minutes on Saturday morning the deadly moment seemed to have arrived. A state employee in a Diamond Head bunker clicked his mouse twice and informed a million and a half residents and tourists that the missile was on its way. “THIS IS NOT A DRILL,” the warning stated. No, it wasn’t a drill. It was a mistake. “Human error,” said Gov. David Ige.

A mistake that left many shaken, angry and questioning the credibility of their government.

Tourists in Waikiki were asked to go into the basement of their hotels, passengers at Daniel K. Inouye International Airport were not allowed to check in and were sent down to the baggage claim area, and families at parks ran to their cars for shelter.

Read more: http://www.staradvertiser.com/2018/01/14/hawaii-news/botched-test-of-alert-system-leads-to-38-minutes-of-terror/?HSA=863c8351326fb2566a657e21f59aad37ea54b6bb

Chicago Tribune: Murder on the margins

More than 10 years have passed, but Margaret Gomez’s family members still look for the man they believe strangled the 22-year-old and left her in a muddy lot in the shadow of the Stevenson Expressway. They don’t expect to find him but feel it’s something they must do. That and pray. “Lately, I said a prayer to the Virgin Mary,” the mother, who shares the same name as her daughter, told a reporter in a quiet voice. “And then you called. Maybe it’s a sign?” Other families have waited even longer for an answer. Over the last 17 years, at least 75 women have been strangled or smothered in Chicago and their bodies dumped in vacant buildings, alleys, garbage cans, snow banks. Arrests have been made in only a third of the cases, according to a first-ever analysis by the Tribune.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-met-chicago-women-strangled-20180103-story.html

Minneapolis Star Tribune: Worker shortage worst in decades

Kevin Yakes spends so much time trying to keep his Golden Valley construction firm staffed, he sometimes feels like a full-time recruiter. During a recent family getaway in Florida, Yakes hopped in the car and drove more than an hour to have beers with a refrigeration technician he wanted to attract to Minnesota. “It’s like dating,” Yakes said. “I’ve never, ever, had such a hard time trying to find people.” Nearly a decade after the U.S. economy collapsed and construction workers fled the industry, Twin Cities builders and contractors are in the midst of one of their busiest years. But a shortage of skilled workers means that new projects — from modest office renovations to soaring new apartment towers — are costing more and taking longer to finish.

Read more: http://www.startribune.com/worse-than-dating-twin-cities-builders-go-all-out-to-find-workers/432561123/

New York Times: Male models accuse photographers of sexual exploitation

For a fashion model, success is the ability to incite desire. The job requirements often include nudity and feigning seduction; provocation is a lever for sales. In the industry, boundaries between the acceptable and the unacceptable treatment of models have been etched in shades of gray. This has allowed prominent photographers to cross the line with impunity for decades, sexually exploiting models and assistants. The experience, once seen as the price models had to pay for their careers, is now being called something else: abuse of power and sexual harassment. Fifteen current and former male models who worked with Bruce Weber, whose racy advertisements for companies like Calvin Klein and Abercrombie & Fitch helped turn him into one of the foremost commercial and fine art photographers, have described to The New York Times a pattern of what they said was unnecessary nudity and coercive sexual behavior, often during photo shoots. … In accounts going back to the mid-1990s, 13 male assistants and models who have worked with the photographer Mario Testino, a favorite of the English royal family and Vogue, told The Times that he subjected them to sexual advances that in some cases included groping and masturbation.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/13/style/mario-testino-bruce-weber-harassment.html?_r=0

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST SEVERAL WEEKS • JAN. 10, 2018

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Carjackings rise as technology slows parked car thefts

Analicia Kocher had just pulled up outside her home in the Shaw neighborhood early one morning last month when she saw someone running up to her car.The 29-year-old, who had already had a weird feeling as she drove home from a comedy show, quickly locked the doors. But the man, who was wearing a ski mask and holding a gun, ordered her out and threw her to the ground when she opened the door. A masked accomplice then jumped in, and the pair took off. When police arrived, Kocher learned that she was the latest victim of a growing problem.

Carjacking in St. Louis has doubled in recent years. And it’s also growing in surrounding areas. … Richard Wright, the chair of the Criminal Justice and Criminology Department at Georgia State University, published a paper on carjacking in St. Louis in 2003, when he was working at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Wright said carjacking has become increasingly popular over the last decade, in part because technology is making it harder to steal parked cars. Many can’t be driven without a key fob nearby.

Read more: http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/carjackings-on-the-rise-st-louis-st-louis-county-saw/article_663a108d-8ce3-556a-8979-69a79b8fc662.html

Detroit Free Press: Theft plagues unions across US

As the UAW, Fiat Chrysler and federal investigators unravel a scandal over the misappropriation of millions of dollars meant for worker training, federal records show that embezzling from union offices is endemic around the country. U.S. Department of Labor documents obtained by the Free Press show embezzlement from hundreds of union offices nationwide over the past decade. In just the past two years, more than 300 union locations have discovered theft, often resulting in more than one person charged in each instance, the records show. Two UAW incidents uncovered in 2017, one in Michigan and the other in New Jersey, exceed the $1-million mark, among the biggest labor theft cases in a decade. … “Unions are not unique,” said Peter Henning, a former federal prosecutor who teaches law at Wayne State University. “Another group hit hard by embezzlement are churches. You can’t train people to be ethical. It’s just access to money.”

Read more: https://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/2018/01/07/union-theft-embezzlement-theft-significant-reflects-national-business-tr/1005763001/

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: High school, college concussions have health impact

Drew Bouché loves to play catch with his son, Abram. The two often can be seen on The 400 Block public square in downtown Wausau, Wisconsin, tossing a football, smiles on their faces.

Football is deeply rooted in both of their lives. Abram, who is 11 years old, can't wait to play just like his father did before him. At Wausau East High School, Bouché was a running back, a fixture in local sports coverage and someone recognized throughout the community. Bouché's dad, Abram's grandfather was the East football coach. Bouché went to South Dakota State University to further his career, but he never got the chance to shine. He left the sport in his freshman year after a blow to the head left him unable to walk off the field. He lives the consequences of those brain injuries every day. He struggles with extreme and sometimes violent mood swings, migraines, days when depression makes it hard to get out of bed and forgetfulness can cause him to lose track of conversations or what task he's supposed to accomplish. He thinks his struggles with alcohol stem from the injuries, too. Bouché is experiencing what doctors say is typical of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. … Most of the national media attention around CTE has focused on former NFL players, who've won a $1 billion settlement against the league. But Bouché is among countless football players who believe they suffered brain damage without ever playing beyond high school or college.

Read more: https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/2018/01/04/cte-concussions-wausau-east-football-star-lives-depression-rage/635203001/

AP: Most big public colleges don't track suicides

Nearly half of the largest U.S. public universities do not track suicides among their students, despite making investments in prevention at a time of surging demand for mental health services. Tabulating student suicides comes with its own set of challenges and problems. But without that data, prevention advocates say, schools have no way to measure their success and can overlook trends that could offer insight to help them save lives. "If you don't collect the data, you're doing half the job," said Gordon Smith, a former U.S. senator from Oregon who became a prevention advocate after his son, Garrett, took his life in 2003 while attending college. "We need information in mental health if we're actually going to be able to better tailor health and healing." The Associated Press asked the 100 largest U.S. public universities for annual suicide statistics and found that 43 currently track suicides, including 27 that have consistently done so since 2007. Most others said they don't track suicides or could provide police reports for only a few cases known among campus administrators. Schools that don't track suicides include some of the nation's largest, including Arizona State University and the University of Wisconsin.

Des Moines Register: An aging, childless Iowa

The playground at the center of Wiota, Iowa, is ghostly silent. No kids in sight.  Empty swings sway in the wind. Much of this weather-beaten equipment was handed down from the former high school that closed half a century ago. The few young residents in town are easy to spot, often seen on Wiota's eastern outskirts. They're a wild bunch, with names like Red, Mini, Sock, Bear, Blossom, Bailey and Rooster. They're horses. It's more a sad reality than a joke: In Wiota, horses outnumber children, 7-to-2. The town of 100 people just east of the Cass County seat of Atlantic is almost exactly halfway between Omaha and Des Moines, making for a long commute to either metro hub. A dwindling number of children, matched by an increasingly older population, is threatening to turn more and more small towns across rural Iowa into retirement communities. That eventually could prove fatal for Iowa towns built around family farms, jobs at small factories and neighbors of all ages who could rely on each other.

Read more: https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/local/columnists/kyle-munson/2017/12/27/childless-small-towns-iowa-struggle-aging-population/909256001/

New York Times: Unlikely source propelled Russian meddling inquiry

During a night of heavy drinking at an upscale London bar in May 2016, George Papadopoulos, a young foreign policy adviser to the Trump campaign, made a startling revelation to Australia’s top diplomat in Britain: Russia had political dirt on Hillary Clinton. About three weeks earlier, Mr. Papadopoulos had been told that Moscow had thousands of emails that would embarrass Mrs. Clinton, apparently stolen in an effort to try to damage her campaign. Exactly how much Mr. Papadopoulos said that night at the Kensington Wine Rooms with the Australian, Alexander Downer, is unclear. But two months later, when leaked Democratic emails began appearing online, Australian officials passed the information about Mr. Papadopoulos to their American counterparts, according to four current and former American and foreign officials with direct knowledge of the Australians’ role. The hacking and the revelation that a member of the Trump campaign may have had inside information about it were driving factors that led the F.B.I. to open an investigation in July 2016 into Russia’s attempts to disrupt the election and whether any of President Trump’s associates conspired.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/30/us/politics/how-fbi-russia-investigation-began-george-papadopoulos.html?_r=0

Washington Post: Seniors hope they can quit working in a few years

Tom Coomer of Tulsa, Oklahoma, has retired twice: once when he was 65, and then several years ago. Each time he realized that with just a Social Security check, “You can hardly make it these days.” So here he is at 79, working full time at Walmart. During each eight-hour shift, he stands at the store entrance greeting customers, telling a joke and fetching a “buggy.” Or he is stationed at the exit, checking receipts and the shoppers that trip the theft alarm. “As long as I sit down for about 10 minutes every hour or two, I’m fine,” he said during a break. Diagnosed with spinal stenosis in his back, he recently forwarded a doctor’s note to managers. “They got me a stool.” The way major U.S. companies provide for retiring workers has been shifting for about three decades, with more dropping traditional pensions every year. The first full generation of workers to retire since this turn offers a sobering preview of a labor force more and more dependent on their own savings for retirement.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/i-hope-i-can-quit-working-in-a-few-years-a-preview-of-the-us-without-pensions/2017/12/22/5cc9fdf6-cf09-11e7-81bc-c55a220c8cbe_story.html?utm_term=.5872a6acaddd

Chicago Tribune: Suburbs fail to turn in camera studies

Since red light cameras were introduced in Chicago’s suburbs a decade ago, state and local officials have routinely ignored requirements to analyze the safety impact at the intersections where cameras were placed, a Tribune investigation has found. The result: The state has not ordered a single camera removed for ineffectiveness as suburbs have collected millions of dollars in fines — sometimes in places where crashes increased after cameras were turned on.

When the cameras were proposed a decade ago, supporters pledged their primary purpose was to reduce crashes. To prove they worked, a rigorous process was carved into state law and Illinois Department of Transportation policies that supporters said would show the cameras improved safety, not just filled town coffers. Under that process, suburbs were supposed to conduct two studies of crash figures at red light camera intersections, and if crashes actually increased, a third, deeper study to figure out why. Yet for years, the Tribune found, those requirements were often sidestepped, with towns failing to turn in complete reports, or any reports at all, and with IDOT failing to follow up.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/watchdog/redlight/ct-met-red-light-cameras-studies-20171107-story.html

Baltimore Sun: Wind power faces gusts of opposition

David Friend began scouting the former strip coal mine here 16 years ago, with visions that it could one day produce a different sort of energy. The developer persuaded landowners along the blustery ridge in Western Maryland to bless his plans for more than two dozen wind turbines that would tower more than 40 stories high. But after a years-long battle with Allegany County officials and concerned neighbors — a saga that has passed through the local zoning board and state Public Service Commission, and reached Maryland’s highest court — the clear-cut hilltops remain bare. The modern windmills that are visible from Interstate 68 are mostly in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Tens of thousands more have sprouted across the country.

It’s one of many examples in Maryland showing that, despite rhetoric to the contrary, it’s not always easy going green. … While Maryland leaders bill the state as a progressive adopter of green energy, not all of the subsidies support clean projects. Proposed wind farms like the one on Dan’s Mountain have sputtered while much of the ratepayer investment is subsidizing the incineration of household trash, a paper-making byproduct known as black liquor and other fuels that emit greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/environment/bs-md-wind-farms-20171115-story.html

New York Times: Out of chaos, Trump reshapes immigration

Late to his own meeting and waving a sheet of numbers, President Trump stormed into the Oval Office one day in June, plainly enraged.

Five months before, Mr. Trump had dispatched federal officers to the nation’s airports to stop travelers from several Muslim countries from entering the United States in a dramatic demonstration of how he would deliver on his campaign promise to fortify the nation’s borders.

But so many foreigners had flooded into the country since January, he vented to his national security team, that it was making a mockery of his pledge. Friends were calling to say he looked like a fool, Mr. Trump said. According to six officials who attended or were briefed about the meeting, Mr. Trump then began reading aloud from the document, which his domestic policy adviser, Stephen Miller, had given him just before the meeting. The document listed how many immigrants had received visas to enter the United States in 2017. More than 2,500 were from Afghanistan, a terrorist haven, the president complained. Haiti had sent 15,000 people. They “all have AIDS,” he grumbled, according to one person who attended the meeting and another person who was briefed about it by a different person who was there. … While Mr. Trump has been repeatedly frustrated by the limits of his power, his efforts to remake decades of immigration policy have gained increasing momentum as the White House became more disciplined and adept at either ignoring or undercutting the entrenched opposition of many parts of the government. The resulting changes have had far-reaching consequences, not only for the immigrants who have sought to make a new home in this country, but also for the United States’ image in the world.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/23/us/politics/trump-immigration.html?_r=0

Charlotte Observer: 45 prison officers fired for sleeping since 2012

Toward the end of her 18-hour shift, prison officer Anita Merritt fell asleep while guarding an inmate in a hospital bed. The prisoner should have had his hands restrained but didn’t, according to a superintendent’s letter. Merritt, an officer at Pender Correctional Institution, was fired for the 2016 incident at UNC Hillsborough Hospital. “Your failure to remain alert could have jeopardized the safety and the security of the hospital staff, visitors and other patients within the facility,” the dismissal letter said. Merritt was among more than 45 North Carolina prison officers who were fired for sleeping on the job since 2012, a Charlotte Observer investigation found. Some dozed inside hospitals with loaded guns at their sides while inmates they were supposed to be guarding sat nearby. Others were found sleeping in control rooms where officers watch inmates, or in vehicles used to monitor prison fence lines. It’s a problem that endangers officers and inmates, as well as the public, experts say. … State officials have contributed to the problem. Prison leaders have burned out some officers by forcing them to work dangerous amounts of overtime, current and former staffers say. And pay for prison officers – which is set by state lawmakers – remains so low that many work second jobs, a fact that has made a perilous situation more so, current and former officers told the Observer.

Read more: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article190975369.html

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Dec. 20, 2017

Honolulu Civil Beat: Insurance “Hell” leaves many injured workers broken

The Honolulu Civil Beat reports after an eight-month investigation that Hawaii’s workers’ comp system forces many injured workers with long-lasting or complex injuries to battle insurance companies and their hand-picked doctors to get treatment and disability payments. The 501(c)3 tax-exempt news organization says the system was designed to be “no-fault,” much like auto insurance – you get hurt, you get treatment. But for some workers, it too often turns into a litigious nightmare. While workers often prevail, it can mean hiring lawyers and waiting for years as the insurers deny treatment plans and appeal administrative decisions over and over again on the same or similar grounds. In the meantime, disability payments and treatment are cut off. The insurers can afford to wait out workers. Many workers decide to accept lump-sum settlements rather than continue to fight.

Read more: http://www.civilbeat.org/2017/12/insurance-hell-leaves-many-injured-workers-broken/?utm_source=Civil+Beat+Master+List&utm_campaign=3f53ec1c57-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_12_12&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_51c2dd3cf3-3f53ec1c57-401773613&mc_cid=3f53ec1c57&mc_eid=7832345616

Los Angeles Times: L.A. keeps building by freeways where people get sick

The Los Angeles Times reports that for more than a decade, California air quality officials have warned against building homes within 500 feet of freeways. And with good reason: People there suffer higher rates of asthma, heart attacks, strokes, lung cancer and pre-term births. Recent research has added more health risks to the list, including childhood obesity, autism and dementia. Yet Southern California civic officials have flouted those warnings, allowing a surge in home building near traffic pollution, according to a Los Angeles Times analysis of U.S. Census data, building permits and other government records. In Los Angeles alone officials have approved thousands of new homes within 1,000 feet of a freeway — even as they advised developers that this distance poses health concerns. The city issued building permits for 4,300 homes near freeways in 2015 — more than in any year over the last decade — and signed off on an additional 3,000 units last year.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-me-freeway-pollution/

Arizona Republic: Many dead immigrants along Mexico border uncounted

The Arizona Republic reports that the bodies of hundreds of immigrants who died illegally crossing the southwestern border with Mexico are found each year. Border Patrol agents encounter some of the dead, and count them in the agency's annual report that constitutes the only official reckoning of the death toll. But an investigation by the USA TODAY NETWORK has found many migrant deaths are never accounted for — including when bodies are discovered by sheriff’s deputies, police, ranchers, hikers and humanitarian groups. Illegal crossings along the southwestern border have claimed 7,209 lives over the past 20 years, according to official Border Patrol statistics, but the actual number is far higher. A USA TODAY NETWORK investigation found federal authorities largely fail to count border crossers when their remains are recovered by local authorities, and even local counts are often incomplete.

Read more: https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/politics/border-issues/2017/12/14/investigation-border-patrol-undercounts-deaths-border-crossing-migrants/933689001/

Washington Post: DEA agents say big investigation ended in a whimper

The Washington Post reports a team at the Drug Enforcement Administration was ready to move on the biggest opioid distribution case in U.S. history. They wanted to close some of the 30 drug warehouses of McKesson Corp., the nation’s largest drug company, and to fine the company more than $1 billion. And they wanted to bring the first-ever criminal case against a drug distribution company. But top attorneys at the DEA and Justice Department struck a deal in January with the corporation and its powerful lawyers. It illustrates the long-standing conflict between the drug investigators, who have taken an aggressive approach to a prescription opioid epidemic that has killed nearly 200,000 people in the past 16 years, and government attorneys, according to a joint investigation by The Washington Post and “60 Minutes.”

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/mckesson-dea-opioids-fine/2017/12/14/ab50ad0e-db5b-11e7-b1a8-62589434a581_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_mckesson-603am%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.8433ace7d08b

Honolulu Star Advertiser: Proposed “tent cities” rouse debate

The Honolulu Star Advertiser reports that legislators and Gov. David Ige fundamentally disagree on whether the use of legalized homeless camps known as safe zones are an effective way of helping the state’s massive homeless population. The disconnect doesn’t bode well for the upcoming legislative session, where the issue of homelessness is sure to be a top priority. Lawmakers, including the chairmen of the House and Senate housing committees, assert that government-sanctioned safe zones, sometimes referred to as tent cities, need to be part of the effort to eventually transition homeless individuals off the streets. But the governor isn’t sold on the idea, and preliminary recommendations from a working group headed by the governor’s coordinator on homelessness do not include any proposals for creating safe zones on Oahu.

Read more: http://www.staradvertiser.com/2017/12/17/hawaii-news/proposed-tent-cities-rouse-debate/?HSA=2f016fbdd335e1f8491293c7e82ea2d08b2730ad

Topeka Capital-Journal: Police actions cost city

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that when former Topeka police officer Jeremy Carlisle-Simons made the unlawful arrest in September 2014 that would lead to his departure from the force, he threw an uncooperative subject to the ground, screamed obscenities and pounded his fist into the man’s back. The city of Topeka would pay $50,000 for his actions, contributing to more than $400,000 in total settlements and claims related to police activity since 2010. As the threat of a civil lawsuit influences the city’s response to the fatal police shooting in September of Dominique White, a Kansas Open Records Act request by The Topeka Capital-Journal revealed dozens of payments ranging from $300,000 for a notorious shooting involving off-duty Topeka police officers to $16 for a driver’s license taken by an officer and never returned. The police department also agreed to provide a video of the Carlisle-Simons arrest, which hasn’t been seen publicly until now.

Read more: http://cjonline.com/news/local-government/local/2017-12-16/exclusive-video-shows-officer-s-use-force-unlawful-arrest

Minneapolis Star-Tribune: Elder abuse reports tossed in trash

The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reports the abrupt firing of a senior regulator at the Minnesota Department of Health is unleashing a torrent of complaints by employees who describe dysfunction and disarray at the state agency responsible for protecting vulnerable adults at senior care facilities. In interviews with the Star Tribune, employees described an office so overwhelmed by backlogged cases that workers dumped dozens of maltreatment complaints into recycling bins without reading them. Others said unread complaint forms piled up into stacks 2 feet high and went unexamined for months. Workers contacted the Star Tribune after learning that Nancy A. Omondi was terminated last month as director of the agency’s health regulation division. Her firing came just weeks after the Star Tribune published a five-part series documenting that ­hundreds of residents at senior care centers across Minnesota are beaten, sexually assaulted or robbed each year.

Read more: http://www.startribune.com/employees-describe-dysfunction-and-roadblocks-at-minnesota-agency-that-investigates-elder-abuse/464643883/

Kansas City Star: Don’t expect action on racial profiling cases in Kansas

The Kansas City Star reports there have been 592 racial profiling complaints

made to Kansas law enforcement agencies and the Kansas Attorney General’s office in the past five years. But in most cases, the complaints are not substantiated — a result that critics say is not only hard to believe, but raises questions about the state’s nearly 20-year effort to combat racial profiling. Despite the passage of two laws to address the issue, The Star found that Kansas’ system of tracking racial profiling complaints is ineffective, opaque and deeply flawed — from incomplete data collection to redacted records to agencies simply not participating. A recent investigation by The Star showed that secrecy is pervasive in the Sunflower State. The state’s handling of racial profiling complaints is another example.

Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/news/politics-government/article190119129.html

New York Times: You still won‘t be able to file your taxes on a postcard

The New York Times reports that the Republican tax bill does not pass the postcard test. It leaves nearly every large tax break in place. It creates as many new preferences for special interests as it gets rid of. It will keep corporate accountants busy for years to come. And no taxpayer will ever see the postcard-size tax return that President Trump laid a kiss on in November as Republican leaders launched their tax overhaul effort. This was not the grand simplification of the code that Republicans promised when they set out to eliminate tax breaks and cut the number of tax brackets as they lowered rates. As their bill tore through Congress, their ambitions fell to the powerful forces of lobbying and the status quo. Killed tax breaks returned to life. New ones sprung up beside them. A plan for three individual tax brackets became five, and finally eight.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/16/us/politics/republican-tax-plan-simple-tax-returns.html

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Waiting for Social Security disability decisions

The Cleveland Plain Dealer reports that for tens of thousands of Ohioans applying for Social Security disability benefits, an underfunded and inadequately staffed federal system means months, and even years, of waiting to get in front of a judge and receive a decision on a claim. More than 1 million people across the country are waiting on average more than 600 days--about 19 months-- for these hearings. In some parts of the country, the wait is longer than two years. The Social Security Administration's problems processing disability claims stretch back decades and track closely with the funding the agency receives through the Congressional budget process. The agency has seen an 11 percent budget cut since 2010 and could see another 4 percent drop next year. Hiring freezes, staff cuts and other cost-saving measures because of this belt-tightening have adversely impacted disabled people who are out of work and need help, experts say. Judges argue it's impossible for them to handle the current workload without more support staff.

Read more: http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2017/12/wait_for_a_social_security_dis.html#incart_2box

The Oregonian: Fired but fit for duty: Impunity for bad policing in Oregon

The Oregonian reports that the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training wins national praise for holding police officers accountable for bad behavior. Academics, journalists and regulators in other states describe the department as a model. But an investigation by The Oregonian/OregonLive found that state regulators took no action to sideline dozens of officers fired for chronically inept police work. Or worse. The department let fired officers remain eligible to work even after they accumulated records of brutality, recklessness, shoddy investigations and anger management problems. Regulators have chosen to shy away from some of the public's greatest concerns about policing, interviews with agency officials show. They don't think it's their job to punish officers for brutality. They don't think it's their job to punish officers for incompetence. They don't think it's their job to even contemplate punishing officers who haven't been convicted of a crime or who haven't lost their jobs.

Read more: http://www.oregonlive.com/police-fire/2017/12/police_brutality_and_incompetence.html#incart_target2box_default_#incart_target2box_targeted_

Toledo Blade: Ohio renters often left in dark about lead and health risks

The Toledo Blade reports more than 500 addresses were on a list released by the Ohio Department of Health in May with orders to vacate due to untreated lead hazards. In each of these homes, at least one child had been poisoned and property owners have not submitted evidence that the required improvements have been made. Blade reports in May found more than half of the more than two dozen homes in Lucas County were occupied, and many of those residents said they had not been informed by their landlords or the health department that there were orders to vacate. The health department acknowledged it was not actively checking to ensure the homes were vacant. In August, Blade journalists used the most recent list published by the state health department and visited every house in Cuyahoga, Hamilton, and Franklin counties, which had the most properties on the state list, with about 210 properties among them. In each of these homes, a child has been lead-poisoned, local health departments investigated the properties and ordered improvements and upgrades. And, owners of each of these homes have not complied, resulting in notices of noncompliance or orders to vacate.

Read more: https://www.toledoblade.com/Medical/2017/12/16/Toledo-not-alone-in-troubles-with-lead-hazard-notifications.html

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Dec. 14, 2017

AP: San Diego’s sunny identity threatened by homeless crisis

The Associated Press reports that like other major cities all along the West Coast, San Diego is struggling with a homeless crisis. In a place that bills itself as "America's Finest City," renowned for its sunny weather, surfing and fish tacos, spiraling real estate values have contributed to spiraling homelessness, leaving more than 3,200 people living on the streets or in their cars. Most alarmingly, the explosive growth in the number of people living outdoors has contributed to a hepatitis A epidemic that has killed 20 people in the past year — the worst U.S. outbreak of its kind in 20 years. Deplorable sanitary conditions help spread the liver-damaging virus that lives in feces.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2017/12/07/us/ap-us-homeless-crisis-on-the-coast-san-diego.html?_r=0

AP: State lawmakers' outside jobs present possible conflicts 

The Associated Press reported that state lawmakers around the country have introduced and supported policies that directly and indirectly help their own businesses, their employers and sometimes their personal finances. An analysis of disclosure forms and legislative votes by the Center for Public Integrity and The Associated Press found numerous examples in which lawmakers' votes had the effect of promoting their private interests. Even then, the votes did not necessarily represent a conflict of interest as defined by the state. That's because legislatures set their own rules for when lawmakers should recuse themselves. In some states, lawmakers are required to vote despite any ethical dilemmas. Many lawmakers defend votes that benefit their businesses or industries, saying they bring important expertise to the debate.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/state-lawmakers-outside-jobs-present-possible-conflicts/2017/12/06/18891630-dacc-11e7-a241-0848315642d0_story.html?utm_term=.d52eaf425c5e

AP: North Carolina steps in on child abuse cases involving sect

The Associated Press reports that North Carolina’s state child welfare agency will participate in reviewing every new allegation of abuse and neglect involving a controversial church that has been the focus of an Associated Press investigation exposing years of physical and emotional mistreatment of congregants, including children. Under North Carolina’s child welfare system, county agencies are responsible for investigating abuse allegations. The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services provides oversight and training, but generally does not get involved in a county agency’s daily operations. The state would not say what prompted the move, but it follows a series of AP stories that have cited dozens of former Word of Faith Fellowship members who say congregants are regularly beaten to “purify” sinners. Founded in 1979, the evangelical sect has grown to about 750 congregants in North Carolina and a total of nearly 2,000 other followers worldwide.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/religion/north-carolina-steps-in-on-child-abuse-cases-involving-sect/2017/12/08/8d57b6fe-dc45-11e7-a241-0848315642d0_story.html?utm_term=.81ae79baf850

Arizona Republic: Officers under scrutiny at one agency often move to others

The Arizona Republic reports that police officers who are fired for misconduct or resign before the hammer drops are able to move from agency to agency. In Arizona, no central repository exists of police officers’ career records, which makes it impossible for hiring departments, and the public, to get a full picture of the complaints against them and how they have been handled, according to an Arizona Republic investigation. A state agency, the Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training Board, or AZPOST, provides basic monitoring and certification designed to make sure officers meet minimum standards. It tracks officer terminations and resignations and highlights internal investigations and criminal charges.

But there are loopholes in the oversight.

Read more: https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona/2017/12/07/arizona-officers-under-scrutiny-one-agency-often-move-others/820139001/

Sacramento Bee; Stressed California dams often go years without repairs

The Sacramento Bee reports that when it comes to inspecting dams, California is second to none. A panel of national experts examined the state’s Division of Safety of Dams last year and declared it tops in the field, citing inspectors’ knack for flagging small problems before they turn serious. Getting dam owners to fix those flaws quickly is another matter. A Sacramento Bee investigation prompted by the nearly catastrophic failure of Oroville Dam’s flood-control spillway in February found that owners of some of California’s most important dams – those whose failure could cause residents downstream to lose their lives – often allow deficiencies to linger for years – even though these shortcomings get cited repeatedly in annual inspection reports.

Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/news/investigations/article188694419.html

Los Angeles Times: A secret list of police with histories of misconduct

The Los Angeles Times reports there is a secret Sheriff’s Department list that now includes about 300 deputies with histories of dishonesty and similar misconduct. The newspaper’s investigation found the list is so tightly controlled that it can be seen by only a handful of high-ranking sheriff’s officials. Not even prosecutors can access it. Amid growing public scrutiny over police misconduct, Sheriff Jim McDonnell wants to give the names on the list to prosecutors, who are required by law to tell criminal defendants about evidence that would damage the credibility of an officer called as a witness. But McDonnell’s efforts have ignited a fierce legal battle with the union that represents rank-and-file deputies. The dispute, which the California Supreme Court is expected to decide next year, is playing out in a state with some of the nation’s strictest secrecy laws on police misconduct.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-sheriff-brady-list-20171208-htmlstory.html

Denver Post: In rural Colorado, no one replaces dying and retiring doctors

The Denver Post reports health care in rural America is ill. Dozens of studies have documented the symptoms: People who live in rural areas are more likely to die from heart diseasestrokecancerinjuriesdrug overdosescar crashes and suicide. Women are more likely to die in childbirth. Children are more likely to die as infants.

Dozens more studies have sought to diagnose the cause. Rural areas generally have higher rates of smoking and povertylower quality of vegetables in the grocery store, and longer drive times to reach trauma care. But, mostly, the studies keep coming back to the same problem. There just aren’t enough doctors and other medical providers. Nationally, fewer than 10 percent of the nation’s physicians practice in a rural area — even though such areas hold 20 percent of the U.S. population. In Colorado, there are 13 counties — all rural — that do not have a hospital, including two without even a clinic. Two counties, including Crowley, don’t have a single doctor.

Read more: http://www.denverpost.com/2017/12/10/colorado-divide-rural-health-care/

Hartford Courant: Five years after Sandy Hook, schools violating safety rules.

The Hartford Courant reports how five years ago the world was stunned by a crime unprecedented in its horror — the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School that took the lives of 20 first-graders and six adults. State legislators reacted to the massacre not only by enacting tougher gun laws but also by earmarking millions to make Connecticut schools safer, including addressing concerns raised after the shooting about access to school buildings, communication failures and multi-agency coordination gaps. But now a Courant investigation has found that those efforts, started when the pain of Sandy Hook was fresh, have largely dwindled. Nearly half the school districts in the state are violating at least some aspect of the law requiring them to submit school security information, a Courant review of state records reveals.

Read more: http://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-news-sandy-hook-school-security-laws-violated-20171201-story.html

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Georgia Medical board easy on opioid violators

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that over the past decade the state death toll from opioid-related overdoes has exploded, last year claiming 982 lives. Many more could have died: Emergency workers in Georgia administered opioid overdose-reversing medications nearly 10,000 times last year. To attack the epidemic, Georgia this fall formed a statewide opioid task force whose goals include taking a hard line against doctors who deal. But an investigation by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution found that the arm of state government charged with protecting the public from dangerous doctors — the Georgia Composite Medical Board — rarely yanks the licenses of physicians who behave more like dealers than healers. Years into the opioid crisis, the Georgia board has taken public action against only a handful of doctors a year for improper opioid prescribing, the AJC found in a review of board actions since 2011.

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/public-affairs/georgia-lets-doctors-keep-practicing-despite-opioid-violations/VIWYD0oplqfzb8BgDF4v1J/

Chicago Tribune: Commercial and industrial property assessments defy logic

The Chicago Tribune reports that amid the most tumultuous real estate market since the Great Depression, Cook County Assessor Joseph Berrios produced valuations for thousands of commercial and industrial properties in Chicago that did not change from one reassessment to the next, not even by a single dollar. That fact, one finding in an unprecedented ProPublica Illinois-Chicago Tribune analysis of tens of thousands of property records, points to a conclusion that experts say defies any logical explanation except one: Berrios failed at one of his most important responsibilities — estimating the value of commercial and industrial properties. What’s more, a separate analysis reveals commercial and industrial property assessments throughout Cook County were so riddled with errors that they created deep inequities, punishing small businesses while cutting a break to owners of high-value properties and helping fuel a cottage industry of politically powerful tax attorneys.

Read more: http://apps.chicagotribune.com/news/watchdog/cook-county-property-tax-divide/index.html

Baltimore Sun: Paper mill burns a polluting sludge called black liquor

The Baltimore Sun reports the paper mill in Luke, Maryland, is the town’s largest employer and has powered the economy in its corner of Appalachia for generations, producing paper for countless Campbell’s soup labels and glossy covers for National Geographic and Playboy. Even as other factories in this stretch of Western Maryland have closed down, this mill has managed to survive. That’s in part because the 10-story-high boiler deep inside the mill burns a sludge known as black liquor. The substance, a mix of caustic chemicals and wood waste left over from the papermaking process, was once pollution, a byproduct that fouled the rocky banks of the Potomac. Now, Maryland calls it green energy. It’s not a particularly clean form of energy. Burning black liquor releases carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas that causes climate change.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/environment/bs-md-black-liquor-20171020-story.html

Boston Globe: Boston. Racism. Image. Reality

Google the phrase “Most racist city,” and Boston pops up more than any other place, time and time again. It may be easy to write that off as a meaningless digital snapshot of what people say about us, and what we say about ourselves, except that Boston’s reputation problem goes much deeper than an online search. The reputation is real, and pervasive — but, most important, is it deserved? The Globe Spotlight Team analyzed data, launched surveys, and conducted hundreds of interviews, to answer just that question. Spotlight examined the core of Boston’s identity: our renowned colleges and world-class medical institutions; the growth that keeps expanding our skyline; business and politics; and our championship sports teams. And the Spotlight reporters, to get a sense of how much black residents are part of the mainstream of the city, did something decidedly old-school: They visited a number of iconic Boston places and simply counted the number of black people they saw. All told, the findings were troubling. The reasons are complex.

Read more: http://apps.bostonglobe.com/spotlight/boston-racism-image-reality/series/image/

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Vows of transparency lost behind veil of dark money

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported In January 2016, Eric Greitens, then one of a crowd of candidates seeking the Republican nomination for Missouri governor, vowed that the public would always know where his political funding was coming from. Less than a year into his tenure as governor, Greitens has not merely joined in the "game" of hiding financial information from the public — he has mastered it. Today, Greitens is one of the least transparent elected officials in modern state history. Among the information Greitens and his inner circle have withheld from the public: The source of one of his largest campaign contributions; how his campaign obtained a donor list it wasn't supposed to have, and how much money it brought in; the amounts that corporate donors, lobbyists and others paid toward his inauguration festivities; anything about his personal finances; and who is currently funding his public policy campaigns. 

Read more: http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/greitens-onetime-vows-of-transparency-now-lost-behind-a-veil/article_7ec42e1c-493e-53c2-9a66-a85d6fc47c90.html

Las Vegas Review-Journal: Private business conflicted with state job

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports a state Funeral Board official, acting on a tip, in January found unrefrigerated bodies — some decomposing — and a box of limbs in a Reno funeral home warehouse. The business was in violation of state regulations. In some states, a failure to refrigerate human remains would cost a funeral home its license. But the investigation and prosecution of Shaun Bowen, the owner and then-managing funeral director of La Paloma Funeral Services, was far from simple. Bowen had another job: He was a deputy chief investigator at the Nevada attorney general’s office, and it was the responsibility of his colleagues to prosecute the civil charges against him and his business. Bowen, who works in the office’s Medicaid fraud unit and makes $118,000 a year in salary and benefits, had not disclosed his role as the facility’s top boss. He also failed to request approval for the outside job last year, as state regulations require

Read more: https://www.reviewjournal.com/investigations/nevada-investigators-private-business-conflicted-with-state-job/

New York Times: 2020 census raises worries about fairness and accuracy

The New York Times reports that census experts and public officials are expressing growing concerns that the bedrock mission of the 2020 census — an accurate and trustworthy head count of everyone in the United States — is imperiled, with worrisome implications. Preparations for the count already are complicated by a sea change in the census itself: For the first time, it will be conducted largely online instead of by mail. But as the Census Bureau ramps up its spending and work force for the 2020 count, it is saddled with problems. Its two top administrative posts are filled by placeholders. Years of underfunding by Congress and cost overruns on the digital transition have forced the agency to pare back its preparations. Civil liberties advocates also fear that the Trump administration is injecting political considerations into the bureau, a rigidly nonpartisan agency whose population count will be the basis for redrawing congressional and state legislative districts in the early 2020s.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/09/us/census-2020-redistricting.html?_r=0

The News and Observer: Parents reject vaccinations on religious grounds

The News and Observer reports that the number of N.C. kindergarteners opting out of required childhood vaccinations on religious grounds more than doubled in the five school years from 2012 to 2016. And both public health officials and anti-vaccine advocates agree that the exemption is being claimed by parents whose true objection to the shots has nothing to do with faith. “I’ve had parents tell me they use it because there is no way for the state to decline it,” said Sen. Jeff Tarte, a Republican from Mecklenburg County. In 2015, he introduced a bill that would have eliminated the religious exemption for all children except those who are homeschooled. He and his co-sponsors dropped the bill within two weeks because of opposition from those who say the government should not force anyone to be injected with anything.

Read more: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/politics-government/article188633004.html

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Dec. 7, 2017

AP: FBI gave heads-up to fraction of Russian hackers’ US targets

The Associated Press reported the FBI failed to notify scores of U.S. officials that Russian hackers were trying to break into their personal Gmail accounts despite having evidence for at least a year that the targets were in the Kremlin’s crosshairs. Nearly 80 interviews with Americans targeted by Fancy Bear, a Russian government-aligned cyberespionage group, turned up only two cases in which the FBI had provided a heads-up. Even senior policymakers discovered they were targets only when the AP told them, a situation some described as bizarre and dispiriting. “It’s utterly confounding,” said Philip Reiner, a former senior director at the National Security Council, who was notified by the AP that he was targeted in 2015. “You’ve got to tell your people. You’ve got to protect your people.” The FBI declined to discuss its investigation into Fancy Bear’s spying campaign, but did provide a statement that said in part: “The FBI routinely notifies individuals and organizations of potential threat information.”

Read more: https://apnews.com/f1a5570b7ce04d39bab00ae3a9041460

AP: Big contracts, no storm tarps for Puerto Rico

The Associated Press reported that after Hurricane Maria damaged tens of thousands of homes in Puerto Rico, a newly created Florida company with an unproven record won more than $30 million in contracts from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide emergency tarps and plastic sheeting for repairs. Bronze Star LLC never delivered those urgently needed supplies, which even months later remain in demand by hurricane victims on the island. FEMA eventually terminated the contracts, without paying any money, and re-started the process this month to supply more tarps for the island. The earlier effort took nearly four weeks from the day FEMA awarded the contracts to Bronze Star and the day it canceled them. Thousands of Puerto Ricans remain homeless, and many complain that the federal government is taking too long to install tarps. The U.S. territory has been hit by severe rainstorms in recent weeks that have caused widespread flooding.

Read more: https://apnews.com/cbeff1a939324610b7a02b88f30eafbb

AP: Why Republicans who once fought budget debt now embrace it

The Associated Press asks: When did Republicans stop worrying and learn to love budget deficits? Over the next decade, their tax plan would add at least $1 trillion to the national debt. That would be on top of an additional $10 trillion in deficits over the same period already being by forecast by the Congressional Budget Office. As a share of the economy, the national debt would be rising to levels last seen during the height of World War II. This borrowing spree would mark a sharp reversal for Republicans who made a career of sounding the alarm that mounting national debt would ultimately crush the economy and perhaps impoverish future generations. So what changed? Republicans gained control of the House and Senate as well as the White House, said Robert Bixby, executive director of the Concord Coalition, an advocate for fiscal responsibility. Its all-inclusive control gave the party the leverage to focus on slashing tax cuts, rather than taking the sometimes painful steps required to curb the debt.

Read more: https://apnews.com/79c68d1dea90416bbcd027d9b1e0c69f/Why-Republicans-who-once-fought-budget-debt-now-embrace-it

San Francisco Chronicle: A year after fire, inspection troubles persist

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that a year after the Ghost Ship fire, people are still living in unlawfully converted artist warehouses throughout Oakland, and city officials have yet to fully correct deficiencies in their inspection programs to prevent another disaster. The city still has a backlog of roughly 1,000 commercial properties it has not inspected as required by state law. And 21 of 32 buildings brought to the city’s attention after the Ghost Ship fire for possibly holding unauthorized events or residents remain out of compliance with building and fire codes. Some are used as dwellings. The city acknowledges it probably does not have a full tally on illegally converted buildings or the hazards they may hold. City officials have defended their response to shortcomings that drew scrutiny after the fire, saying they have taken steps to make Oakland safer than it was a year ago.

Read more: http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/A-year-after-Ghost-Ship-Oakland-still-has-12397151.php

Sun Sentinel: Downtown development could overwhelm leaky sewer system

The Sun Sentinel reports that Fort Lauderdale’s downtown sewer system was already straining two years ago, but the city kept approvals flowing for thousands of new condos, hotel rooms and stores. A South Florida Sun Sentinel review of development and sewer records shows a system groaning under the city’s momentous growth. A utilities expert said the downtown sewer pump was working at its maximum two years ago and could not support more development. But since then, the city has approved 26 downtown projects with 6,368 residential units, plus 104 hotel rooms, 285,378 square feet of retail and 1 million square feet of office space, records show. No downtown high-rise has been rejected because of the city’s deteriorating infrastructure. With a series of yes votes over the past five years, the city has ushered in the largest sustained period of development in the downtown’s history, records show.

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fl-sb-development-sewage-lauderdale-20171110-story.html

New York Times: Tax victory in sight, Republicans eye next step: Cut spending

The New York Times reports that as the tax cut legislation passed by the Senate hurtles toward final approval, Republicans are preparing to use the swelling deficits made worse by the package as a rationale to pursue their long-held vision: undoing the entitlements of the New Deal and Great Society, leaving government leaner and the safety net skimpier for millions of Americans. Speaker Paul D. Ryan and other Republicans are beginning to express their big dreams publicly, vowing that next year they will move on to changes in Medicare and Social Security. Their nearly $1.5 trillion package of tax cuts, a plan likely to win final approval in the coming days, could be the first step. But their strategy poses enormous risks, not only for millions of Americans who rely on entitlement programs, but also for Republicans who would wade into politically difficult waters, cutting popular benefits for the elderly and working poor just after cutting taxes for profitable corporations.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/02/us/politics/tax-cuts-republicans-entitlements-medicare-social-security.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fus&action=click&contentCollection=us®ion=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=9&pgtype=sectionfront&_r=0

Chicago Tribune: Can these Chicago high schools survive?

Theron Averett Jr. was one of 250 students enrolled this year at the South Side’s Tilden High School, which Chicago Public Schools says has room for about 1,900 students. Dwindling enrollment has cut Tilden's budget. The school now offers only a small slate of classes. Tilden's football team forfeited most of its season for a lack of players, leaving homecoming without a game to celebrate. Last year's graduating class, on average, scored 14.5 on the ACT, far short of what's considered college-ready. In Chicago, where funding follows students, Tilden is one of more than a dozen shrinking neighborhood high schools that has been starved of resources. Using academic, demographic and enrollment data — in addition to criteria CPS employed to close 50 schools in 2013 — the Tribune identified 17 neighborhood high schools hardest hit by dwindling enrollment and poor academics.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-met-chicago-schools-enrollment-decline-20171129-story.html

Des Moines Register: Despite GOP warnings, few Iowa farmers face estate tax

The Des Moines Register reports that if the tax reform packages that have now passed the U.S. House and Senate become law, at least one thing appears likely: The federal estate tax will be slashed and perhaps eliminated altogether. That will represent a victory for Republicans in Iowa’s congressional delegation, who have consistently opposed the tax and argued it unfairly lumps in the state’s farmers with some of the country’s richest families. But a review of federal tax data and nonpartisan research on the subject shows that family farmers and small business owners represent a tiny share of estate tax payers, and that the taxes they owe rarely force them to sell land or quit farming. The number of Iowans paying the estate tax actually numbers in the dozens each year, out of roughly 1.4 million who file federal tax returns each year. IRS data from the last five years shows the number of Iowa taxpayers owing estate taxes ranged from 32 in 2012 to 61 in 2015, and that the vast majority of those probably were not farmers or small business owners.

Read more: https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/2017/12/02/tax-reform-iowa-farmers-estate-tax/906946001/

Topeka Capital-Journal: Official defends free connection to sewer system

The Topeka Capital Journal reports that Riley County Commission Chairman Ron Wells defends a secret deal that enabled his family’s property where he lives on the edge of Manhattan, Kansas, to be connected, free of charge for decades, to the city of Manhattan’s sewer system. The arrangement saving the Wells family thousands of dollars during the past 35 years was stumbled upon by a Riley County environmental health employee looking into the commission chairman’s belated building permit application for work to convert part of a barn into an apartment. County staff were surprised to discover Wells didn’t have county-approved sewer service at two addresses on the property, including the apartment where Wells lives and his mother’s former residence. Wells responded to inquiries from county government colleagues by claiming the existence of an agreement that, since at least 1981, had excluded the payment of monthly fees for sewer lines serving the property.

Read more: http://cjonline.com/state-government/business/local-government/2017-11-30/riley-county-commissioner-defends-free

Boston Globe: Warming waters dim hope for lobster south of Cape Cod

The Boston Globe reports that in the colder waters off the coast of Maine, lobstermen have been hauling in record catches. But south of Cape Cod, where rising sea temperatures have contributed to the decimation of the lobster population, the industry has collapsed. In some areas, catches have plunged 90 percent below their peak in the late 1990s, leaving scant hope that a once-storied fishery can recover. The steep decline has left regulators in a quandary: Should they tighten fishing restrictions in the hope of preserving what’s left of the lobster population? Or accept that conservation efforts may be futile and let lobstermen continue setting thousands of traps? Even scientists who have sought tighter restrictions in hopes of saving the region’s lobster population acknowledge such efforts may be in vain. For an iconic New England industry, the picture is devastating.

Read more: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/12/02/losing-hope-for-lobster-south-cape-cod/YCpElilHT9Hgtnr1cQNGRM/story.html

Record: Management exodus at N.J. Transit

The Record reports that NJ Transit lost a quarter of its railroad managers in the two years prior to a fatal 2016 crash in Hoboken, according to a document the agency sent to federal regulators. The exodus squeezed the agency from both sides: As 49 of NJ Transit's most senior rail supervisors retired between January 2014 and July 2016, a group of younger potential replacements, including some who were considered rising stars, left the agency for jobs from Connecticut to Florida. The Record and NorthJersey.com obtained the list through a Freedom of Information Act request to the Federal Railroad Administration. A total of 93 managers left NJ Transit from January 2014 to July 2016. There were 376 rail management positions then. The names of the 93 managers who left the agency were redacted from the documents The Record received. However, the documents do show the titles, departments and years of experience they had.

Read more: http://www.northjersey.com/story/news/watchdog/2017/11/30/nj-transit-lost-quarter-its-rail-managers-2-years-before-hoboken-crash-documents-show/902104001/

Newark Star Ledger: NJ Environmentalists use new strategy to fight pipelines

The Newark Star Ledger reports that over the years, environmental groups opposed to the expansion of oil and natural gas pipelines across the nation have tried various ways to fight against pipeline projects. Now, Garden State environmental advocates think they've found a way to stop pipeline companies from acquiring the land they need in the first place, and a pipeline project in New Jersey may serve as the legal battleground. The New Jersey Conservation Foundation has sued the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the grounds that the agency's use of eminent domain to take over land for the construction of interstate natural gas pipelines is often unconstitutional. The NJCF is represented by the Eastern Environmental Law Center and the Columbia University Environmental Law Clinic. The lawsuit, filed in federal court in November, cites the Fifth Amendment requirement that any eminent domain action be made for "public use.

Read more: http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2017/12/nj_environmental_groups_sue_feds_over_eminent_doma.html

News and Observer: Faulty radios put prison officers in danger

The News and Observer reports that more than a dozen current and former prison employees described in interviews a potentially life-threatening problem: The two-way radios that officers are issued often don’t work properly, leaving them without a crucial safety tool. The disclosures – made by officers who worked at nine different prisons – come during a deadly time for North Carolina’s prison employees. Since April, five workers have died as a result of attacks inside the prisons. In response to questions from the Observer, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Public Safety said that managers have directed all prisons “to inventory and assess their radios and PA systems.” But prison leaders say better technology has made radios more reliable, and that only 5 percent of radios now malfunction. They say they are quick to repair and replace broken radios.

Read more: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/article187090888.html

Dallas Morning News: More women jailed in Texas though arrests dropped

The Dallas Morning News reports that across Texas, the number of women awaiting trial in county jails has jumped by 48 percent since 2011, according to an analysis of state data. At the peak this year in August, more than 6,300 women were jailed before trial, up from under 4,000 in early 2011. Using monthly headcounts that sheriffs reported to the Texas Commission on Jail Standards, the newspaper found significant increases in women inmates at many jails, especially in rural counties.  During the same time period, men in Texas county jails pretrial increased only 11 percent. The surge doesn’t seem to reflect a crime wave. The number of women getting arrested has actually dropped by 20 percent since 2011, according to the Texas Department of Public Safety. (Arrest data don’t necessarily reflect every time an inmate is jailed.)

Read more: https://www.dallasnews.com/news/social-justice-1/2017/12/03/women-jailed-texas-even-though-arrests-gone

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK

AP: Toxic algae: Once a nuisance, now a severe nationwide threat

The Associated Press reported Lake Erie and other waterways are choked with algae that’s sickening people, killing animals and hammering the economy. The scourge is escalating from occasional nuisance to severe, widespread hazard, overwhelming government efforts to curb a leading cause: fertilizer runoff from farms. Pungent, sometimes toxic blobs are fouling waterways from the Great Lakes to Chesapeake Bay, from the Snake River in Idaho to New York’s Finger Lakes and reservoirs in California’s Central Valley. Tourism and recreation have suffered. An international water skiing festival in Milwaukee was canceled in August; scores of swimming areas were closed nationwide. Algae are essential to food chains, but these tiny plants and bacteria sometimes multiply out of control. Within the past decade, outbreaks have been reported in every state, a trend likely to accelerate as climate change boosts water temperatures.

Read more: https://apnews.com/8ca7048f5cff4b45a634296a358f7309

AP: Radioactive waste continues to leak at Illinois nuclear plants 

The Associated Press reported radioactive waste continues to pour from Exelon's Illinois nuclear power plants more than a decade after the discovery of chronic leaks led to national outrage, a $1.2 million government settlement and a company vow to guard against future accidents, an investigation by a government watchdog group found. Since 2007, there have been at least 35 reported leaks, spills or other accidental releases in Illinois of water contaminated with radioactive tritium, a byproduct of nuclear power production and a carcinogen at high levels, a Better Government Association review of federal and state records shows. No fines were issued for the accidents, all of which were self-reported by the company. The most recent leak of 35,000 gallons occurred over two weeks in May and June at Exelon's Braidwood plant, southwest of Chicago.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/investigation-radioactive-leaks-at-illinois-nuclear-plants/2017/11/17/eb4d1c2c-cbc4-11e7-b506-8a10ed11ecf5_story.html?utm_term=.668098b3d554

Birmingham News: Why Alabama locks up teens as adults

The Birmingham News reports that in Alabama, unlike in most other states, teens who are 16 and 17 are automatically charged as adults for certain crimes, including burglary and murder. Advocates expect reforms to come before the Legislature next year. ="We are in a minority of states that continue to follow a process that I think legislators and constituents and other jurisdictions have decided is barbaric," said Lisa Graybill, deputy legal director at the Southern Poverty Law Center, which has been advocating for juvenile justice system reform. In Alabama, kids as young as 14 can be charged as adults if a juvenile court judge so orders after reviewing a case. But during the "tough on crime" 1990s, state legislators passed a law that bypasses judges and prosecutors for some crimes and some kids. If a 16 or 17-year-old is accused of one of the felonies on the list, they're charged as an adult. There's no judicial review where a judge decides what's appropriate. Prosecutors don't get much leeway.

Read more: http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2017/11/juvenile_justice_reform_kids_c.html

Washington Post: When will sexual abuse in Olympic sports end?

The Washington Post reports more than 290 coaches and officials associated with the United States’ Olympic sports organizations have been publicly accused of sexual misconduct since 1982, according to the newspaper’s review of sport governing body banned lists, news clips and court records in several states. The figure spans parts of 15 sports and amounts to an average of eight adults connected to an Olympic organization accused of sexual misconduct every year — or about one every six weeks — for more than 36 years. The figure includes more than 175 officials convicted of sex crimes as well as those who never faced criminal charges and have denied claims, such as Andy Gabel, an Olympian and former U.S. Speed skating president banned from the sport in 2013 after two women alleged he forced himself on them; and Don Peters, the 1984 Olympic gymnastics coach banned after two women alleged he had sex with them when they were teenagers.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/every-six-weeks-for-more-than-36-years-when-will-sex-abuse-in-olympic-sports-end/2017/11/17/286ae804-c88d-11e7-8321-481fd63f174d_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_olyabuse-137pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.a0551935c83b

Arizona Daily Star: Unapproved economics class tied to Koch network

The Arizona Daily Star reports Tucson’s largest school district has allowed a controversial economics class with a biased textbook and ties to the Koch network to slip through the cracks and be taught at four high schools without being properly vetted or approved. Now, in the middle of the second year of the yearlong class, the Tucson Unified School District Governing Board is scrambling to decide what to do with students who are currently enrolled and grappling with the consequences of having already graduated students who technically didn’t take an approved, required economics class. Critics of the class say the way it was quietly inserted into district curriculum highlights the worst aspects of both the Koch network and TUSD — that the former is attempting to fund an ideological revolution through its clandestine infiltration of public institutions, and the latter is too incompetent to notice a contentious, unapproved course in its schools.

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/local/unapproved-economics-class-with-ties-to-koch-network-being-taught/article_c8a649a1-5967-5260-88f7-9dfd5b90d21b.html

San Francisco Chronicle: “Build-it-yourself” handguns bypass tough state laws

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the man who shot five people to death on a rampage through a small town in the northern Central Valley couldn’t buy guns legally, but by building his own untraceable weapons, he was able to amass an illegal arsenal. Kevin Janson Neal used at least two homebuilt semiautomatic rifles to massacre his wife and four other residents of Rancho Tehama Reserve in Tehama County, authorities who seized the weapons said. Such “ghost guns” are slipping through a loophole in California’s tough firearms laws, according to gun control proponents. One manufacturer of the technology that makes such weapons easy to build says the state’s tough-on-guns stance has created a demand for workarounds that is making him rich.

Read more: http://www.sfchronicle.com/news/article/Build-it-yourself-ghost-guns-bypass-12368674.php

Miami Herald: Florida deletes online inspections of troubled nursing homes

The Miami Herald reports how it and other media wrote extensively about the troubling regulatory history at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills where 13 frail elders died last September in the sweltering aftermath of Hurricane Irma, which knocked out the home’s cooling system. The newspaper also reported on AHCA’s subsequent decision to heavily redact state reports on nursing homes.. Soon after, with no announcement or notice, AHCA wiped its website clean of all nursing home inspections, shielding the industry to the detriment of consumers. Online, AHCA now refers consumers to a separate website managed by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, though that site does not include as much material as the state previously provided. AHCA does maintain spreadsheets online that rate homes on a host of criteria, and allow consumers to compare.

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/broward/article185211503.html

Chicago Tribune: Sandhill cranes bounce back from brink

The Chicago Tribune reports you can once again hear the rolling bugle call of long-necked sandhill cranes gliding overhead. They are appearing with increased frequency across northern Illinois, part of a widespread regional recovery. Once nearly vanished from the Midwest, sandhill cranes have bounced back and returned by the thousands. The population is booming. “It’s an incredible recovery. It’s one of the best Midwest bird stories,” said Rich Beilfuss, president and CEO of the International Crane Foundation. “They’re back in people’s lives in a way we really haven’t seen in a while.” In the 1930s, only two dozen breeding pair of sandhill cranes lived in Wisconsin. The population in the upper Midwest is now between 65,000 and 95,000, researchers estimate. The biggest boost for the sandhill cranes’ re-emergence in the region, scientists say, is the conservation and restoration of wetlands, marshes and prairies, the birds’ preferred habitat for nesting and breeding.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-met-sandhill-cranes-20171115-story.html

Lexington Herald-Leader: Kentucky taxes coffins but not tombstones

The Lexington Herald-Leader reports how for 41 years Kentucky has given a tax break to the bereaved: When a loved one dies, you don’t have to pay the state’s 6 percent sales tax when buying a gravestone. The report is the fifth in a series of stories about tax breaks and incentive programs that cost Kentucky billions of dollars each year, leaving lawmakers little money to fix Kentucky’s ailing pension systems. The tombstone tax exemption is one of hundreds on the books that cost Kentucky about $13 billion a year. That’s more than the state collects in taxes for its General Fund each year. Aside from the headstone exemption, all the other tangible goods used in a funeral — caskets, flowers, urns, stationary — get taxed when they’re bought by a funeral home.  “We exempt far too many things,” Gov. Matt Bevin recently told the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. “We have tax exemptions to the tune of billions and billions of dollars that other states don’t have.”

Read more: http://www.kentucky.com/news/local/watchdog/article184943418.html

Baltimore Sun: Baltimore resident: “I don’t really feel safe anywhere anymore.”

The Baltimore Sun reports that even in a city where crime seems like a chronic rather than an episodic disease, the recent string of killings, shootings and robberies has felt qualitatively different. Mayor Catherine Pugh says the violence is out of control. Three years into a historic spike in killing, it’s not clear that anyone has any idea how to curtail it. In conversations private and public, in neighborhood gathering spaces and on social media, fear is rising. On Nov. 15, Baltimore showed it still had the capacity to shock, in the fatal shooting of police Detective Sean Suiter. The 18-year veteran, who joined the homicide unit in 2015, as the violence began rising, was investigating one of last year’s 318 killings. He became this year’s 309th. The shooter remained at large, even as police descended on the Harlem Park neighborhood, shut down streets and banged on doors in search of the suspect or evidence that would lead to him.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/bs-md-baltimore-crime-reaction-20171117-story.html

Maine Sunday Telegram: State largely ignores role as seas grow more acidic

The Maine Sunday Telegram reports that at last week’s United Nations Climate Change Conference in Germany an issue of vital importance to Maine fishermen and shellfish growers took the international spotlight: the increasing acidity of the sea, which is making it harder for some shellfish to grow their shells. The governors of Washington state and Oregon joined the fisheries minister of Fiji, the meeting’s official host nation, to announce the expansion of a year-old international alliance to combat the problem. It now includes four states, two Canadian provinces and nine national governments. Maine isn’t one of them, nor was anyone from Maine state government at the conference. Nearly three years ago, a bipartisan panel of experts convened by the Legislature concluded that ocean acidification – a byproduct of global warming – represented a potentially catastrophic threat to Maine’s marine harvesters and issued a series of recommendations. But state government and legislators have done little to implement the panel’s recommendations.

Read more: http://www.pressherald.com/2017/11/19/state-largely-ignores-role-as-seas-grow-more-acidic/

Minneapolis Star Tribune: Gun-related cases running at 20-year highs

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports Minnesota prosecutors have taken aim at criminals with guns, sending more to prison for gun-related convictions than at any time in at least two decades. In 2015 and 2016, prosecutors statewide received about 1,200 gun-related cases each year from police, according to a report from the Minnesota Sentencing Guidelines Commission. That’s up more than 50 percent from a decade earlier and more than double the cases forwarded for prosecution in 1996. Lawmakers recently toughened the penalties for illegal possession, extending the law to bullets. Defense attorneys say that this year they’re seeing more gun charges going to trial than ever before. The bulk of the cases come from Hennepin County, where prosecutors have collaborated with the U.S. attorney’s office to go after illegal gun possession. Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman forbids prosecutors from being lenient on guns to strike plea deals.

Read more: http://www.startribune.com/gun-related-cases-hit-20-year-highs-in-minnesota/458518093/

Mississippi Press: Mayor removes Mississippi state flag from city hall

The Mississippi Press reports that on Shea Dobson's first day in office July 3, he made the decision to return the Mississippi state flag to the flagpole outside his office window at Ocean Springs City Hall. Dobson's decision reversed the action of his predecessor, Connie Moran, who had the flag removed years earlier. Earlier this week, however, Dobson changed course and had the flag taken down after months of complaints and protests from those opposed to the state flag, which has become a source of division among Mississippians for the inclusion of the Confederate battle emblem. "It wasn't an easy decision," Dobson told The Mississippi Press. "But it had become clear it was affecting a lot of people in the community, affecting business, affecting our ability to get things done and move forward, so I made the tough call to take it down."

Read more: http://blog.gulflive.com/mississippi-press-news/2017/11/ocean_springs_mayor_says_he_ma.html#incart_river_home

The Record: Write-in candidates successful across New Jersey

The Record reports voters went to the polls across New Jersey on Nov. 7 to find school board races without any candidates, or races where there were more seats than people on the ballot. These seats were clinched by write-in votes — in one case, as few as eight. In recent years, interest in school board positions has waned and more races have attracted just one candidate or none at all. Political activists say communities lose out when they don’t have a rigorous debate on education issues, but they acknowledge the difficulty in fielding school candidates in a state with nearly 600 school districts, some of which are so small that they have just one school. Across New Jersey, there were 128 school board positions on the ballot without candidates, out of a total 1,590 seats up for grabs in the election.. Another 758 seats were uncontested, meaning they attracted just one candidate, not exactly a picture of vibrant democracy.

Read more: http://www.northjersey.com/story/news/education/2017/11/19/write-in-candidates-win-seats-school-boards-across-new-jersey/867922001/

Newark Star Ledger: More guns on streets in New Jersey. Question is Why

The Newark Star Ledger reports the guns being taken off the streets in Newark, New Jersey, these days often range from the firepower of a combat weapon, to modern semi-automatics little different than those carried by police. And in a place where gang violence and illicit drug dealing account for much of its serious crime, there has been a big surge this year in the number that are turning up. Newark Public Safety Director Anthony Ambrose said what they are seeing is far different  from the cheap "Saturday Night Specials" that were once a staple of urban violet crime. Last month in Newark, a search by police of a rental car driven by North Carolina man turned up two revolvers, a semi-automatic pistol and an AR-15 military-style rifle. Already this year, 449 weapons have been recovered or seized in the state's largest city, up from 377 during the same period a year ago, according to Ambrose.

Read more: http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2017/11/why_are_more_guns_turning_up_on_the_street_in_nj.html

New York Times: When unpaid student loans mean you can no longer work

The New York Times reports few people realize that the loans they take out to pay for their education could eventually derail their careers. But in 19 states, government agencies can seize state-issued professional licenses from residents who default on their educational debts. Another state, South Dakota, suspends driver’s licenses, making it nearly impossible for people to get to work. As debt levels rise, creditors are taking increasingly tough actions to chase people who fall behind on student loans. Going after professional licenses stands out as especially punitive. Firefighters, nurses, teachers, lawyers, massage therapists, barbers, psychologists and real estate brokers have all had their credentials suspended or revoked. Determining the number of people who have lost their licenses is impossible because many state agencies and licensing boards don’t track the information.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/18/business/student-loans-licenses.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=first-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

Oregonian: How Oregon let clean energy program enrich rule beakers

The Oregonian reports a Seattle-based energy consultant and the state employee he’s accused of bribing became the public faces of corruption charges at the Oregon Department of Energy after their arrests last summer. But it wasn’t one rogue employee who enabled consultant Martin Shain to reap $12 million in green energy tax credits for solar projects that should have failed to qualify, according to thousands of records reviewed by The Oregonian/OregonLive. Four other Energy Department employees, including the director, helped Shain obtain the credits by circumventing program rules and ignoring deadlines lawmakers insisted on. None of the four has been accused of wrongdoing. All four employees declined to answer questions about their particular roles in greenlighting the tax credits. But records illustrate that officials scrambled to ensure success of the politically high-profile project. Documents also show how the culture of the agency contributed to the misuse of millions in taxpayer funds.

Read more: http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/11/watchdog_report_part_1_of_2_di.html

Dallas Morning News: The airlines are packing ‘em in for profit

The Dallas Morning News reports that as travelers head to the airports this holiday season, those who haven’t flown for a while could be forgiven for wondering if the plane is a bit more cramped than they remembered. For decades, airlines have worked to find new ways to fit as many seats as possible on their aircraft, a trend that hasn’t let up even as carriers are coming off a stretch of record profits that in 2016 totaled $13.5 billion industrywide. But with labor costs rising and gas prices and airport fees steadily inching upward, the pressure is on to control expenses and keep revenue growing apace. Packing even a few more seats onto an aircraft is an efficient way to spread costs over more passengers and ideally earn a few more dollars per flight.

Read more: https://www.dallasnews.com/business/airlines/2017/11/17/airlines-stop-cramming-seats-planes

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Nov. 16, 2017

AP Exclusive: Russia Twitter trolls deflected Trump bad news 

The Associated Press reported disguised Russian agents on Twitter rushed to deflect scandalous news about Donald Trump just before last year's presidential election while straining to refocus criticism on the mainstream media and Hillary Clinton's campaign. An AP analysis of since-deleted accounts shows tweets by Russia-backed accounts such as "America_1st_" and "BatonRougeVoice" on Oct. 7, 2016, actively pivoted away from news of an audio recording in which Trump made crude comments about groping women, and instead touted damaging emails hacked from Clinton's campaign chairman John Podesta. AP's analysis illuminates the obvious strategy behind the Russian cyber meddling: swiftly react, distort and distract attention from any negative Trump news.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/technology/ap-exclusive-russia-twitter-trolls-deflected-bad-trump-news/2017/11/09/cab7945c-c560-11e7-9922-4151f5ca6168_story.html?utm_term=.a0c8a8e9e440

Arizona Republic: Foster care boards don’t look like their communities

The Arizona Republic reports that experts have long recognized inequalities in America's child-welfare system: When kids share identical circumstances except for race, black and Native American children enter foster care more often, spend more time in the system and wait longer to be adopted. In an attempt to ensure fair treatment for kids taken from their parents, Arizona lawmakers decades ago mandated that Foster Care Review Boards — which help decide the fates of children in foster care — mirror the races, ethnicities and income levels of the communities they serve. They don't. Though children of color represent about 60 percent of kids in out-of-home care, Foster Care Review Boards are overwhelmingly  overwhelmingly white. State records indicate nearly 90 percent of board members in Maricopa County and 100 percent of board members in six other counties identify as "Anglo American."

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2017/11/12/arizonas-foster-care-boards-dont-look-like-their-communities-heres-why-matters/526586001/

Miami Herald: Want to see emergency plan for mom’s nursing home? Good luck

The Miami Herald reports that to protect the elderly and disabled residents of Florida’s 683 nursing homes from the ravages of an Irma-like storm or other disaster, state law requires that administrators submit detailed emergency plans to regulators every year. Will residents have enough food and water to survive a prolonged siege? Where will they go during a mandatory evacuation? How will they get there? Is there a generator to operate air-conditioning systems or respirators? But if viewing the emergency management plan is on your checklist of things to do before moving a loved one into a South Florida nursing home, good luck. What information is available points to a troubling reality: Many of the plans will be of little help the next time a hurricane rumbles through.

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/weather/hurricane/article184005576.html

Orlando Sentinel: Election officials say online voter registration a “great tool”

The Orlando Sentinel reports most people do just about everything online today. They pay their bills. They make hotel reservations and file their income tax returns. Now, residents can use their computers to register to vote or change their party affiliation as Florida recently joined 35 other states and the District of Columbia to offer online voter registration. Central Florida elections officials are lauding the online service as a “great tool” that will encourage more people to sign up to vote and improve the accuracy of voter rolls. “The online voter registration process has opened the door to a lot of folks who have not previously registered to vote,” said Michael Ertel, Seminole County Supervisor of Elections. “When I first registered to vote back in the late ’80s, I had to take a forward step. I had to go to the supervisor of elections office. Since that time, elections offices have come to the voters.”

Read more: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/politics/os-online-voter-registration-central-florida-20171109-story.html

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Pison hospital a breeding ground for infection

The Atlanta Journal-Constitutional reports the unsafe and unsanitary conditions at Georgia’s flagship prison medical facility are worse than previously reported and could jeopardize the health of inmates already dealing with cancer and other serious illnesses, newly obtained photos and documents reveal. Photos obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution in the last two weeks show standing water and filth from leaking ceilings only feet away from the operating room, pads on the floor to soak up leaking rain water and air vents covered with dust and other debris at Augusta State Medical Prison. The AJC has also obtained recent letters and emails in which two inmates diagnosed with cancer described broken and dirty toilets and showers as well as other germ-related issues in the dormitories where they were required to recover after surgery. Both inmates said they found the place so unsanitary that they would resist further treatment if they had to have it there.

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/state--regional/conditions-make-georgia-prison-hospital-breeding-ground-for-infection/CJ7PQFmJ2sDFwWXnLpMbRM/

Times-Picayune: How city council spent $155,000 in travel expenses

The Times Picayune reports the prospect of new malls and retail outlets was enticing enough to attract New Orleans City Council staff and two council members themselves to Las Vegas in May 2016. The trip cost taxpayers a combined $14,230 in travel expenses, however, raising questions about what benefit their fact-finding and promotional efforts brought to the city's economy. Records show that wasn't the only retail conference trip to Vegas for Council members Jared Brossett, Nadfine Ramsey and James Gray or their staff. They each went at least once more or sent staffers, spending a combined $36,158 in Las Vegas trips over four years. Those were among dozens of out-of-state trips taken by six out of the council's seven members or their staff using city-issued credit cards in the past five years, according to a NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune analysis of credit card records. In all, council credit cards were charged more than $155,300 for out-of-state trips since 2013, records show.

Read more: http://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/11/council_credit_card_spending.html

Baltimore Sun: Gun arrests decline after indictments of gun task force members  

The Baltimore Sun reports the corruption indictments this year against Baltimore’s elite Gun Trace Task Force has produced an unintended — and undesirable — consequence: a major decline in gun arrests in the city. As Baltimore struggles under surging gun violence, gun arrests are down 25 percent from last year. Much of the decline has come from the police department’s operational intelligence division, of which the task force was a part. The division has made 277 fewer gun arrests this year, a 67 percent drop. Police spokesman T.J. Smith said the dissolution of the task force in March has been a factor. The end to “their methodology of work certainly has contributed to a decline in gun arrests,” Smith said, adding that some of the successes claimed by the unit “might not have been lawful arrests.” The task force was assigned  a job that Police Commissioner Kevin Davis described as a key to quelling the city’s historic violence: getting illegal guns out of the hands of trigger-pullers.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/investigations/bs-md-ci-gun-arrests-drop-20171107-story.html

Minnesota Star Tribune: Abused, ignored in senior homes across Minnesota

The Minnesota Star Tribune reports that every year hundreds of residents at senior care centers around the state are assaulted, raped or robbed in crimes that leave lasting trauma and pain for the victims and their families. Yet the vast majority of these crimes are never resolved, and the perpetrators never punished, because state regulators lack the staff and expertise to investigate them. And thousands of complaints are simply ignored. State records examined by the Star Tribune show the scale of the failure. Last year alone, the Minnesota Department of Health received 25,226 allegations of neglect, physical abuse, unexplained serious injuries, and thefts in state-licensed homes for the elderly. Ninety-seven percent were never investigated. That includes 2,025 allegations of physical or emotional abuse by staff, 4,100 reports of altercations between residents and 300 reported drug thefts.

Read more: http://www.startribune.com/senior-home-residents-are-abused-and-ignored-across-minnesota/450623913/

Kansas City Star: Kansas: “One of the most secretive, darkest states”

The Kansas City Star reports that Kansas runs one of the most secretive state governments in the nation, and its secrecy permeates nearly every aspect of service. From the governor’s office to state agencies, from police departments to business relationships to health care, on the floors of the House and Senate, a veil has descended over the years and through administrations on both sides of the political aisle, the Star found in a months-long investigation. “My No. 1 question to anybody who opts in favor of nondisclosure is, ‘What are you trying to hide from us?’” said former Rep. John Rubin, a Johnson County Republican, calling Kansas “one of the most secretive, dark states in the country in many of these areas.” The examples, when stitched together, form a quilt of secrecy that envelops much of state government. Many lawmakers who have attempted more openness in government say accountability has withered in Gov. Sam Brownback’s era.

Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/news/politics-government/article184179651.html

Rochester Democrat and Chronicle: How states spend your money on Hollywood

The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle reports that although Florida has sunny skies, beautiful beaches and luxurious locations to shoot movies and TV shows, it lacks one key attraction: lucrative tax credits. As a result, the cameras have shut off, and the stars have moved to other states. Even HBO's Ballers, starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, which glamorizes South Beach, left for California after Florida's tax incentives dried up. The situation in Florida has played out in states across the nation, an investigation by the USA TODAY Network found. Some states have increased public spending to bring in shows and films, creating a competition among New York, California, Georgia, Louisiana and other states with big incentives. But other states like Florida, Wisconsin and Michigan have done away with their programs, concluding the tax breaks weren't producing enough of a return on investment.

Read more: http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/politics/albany/2017/11/09/battle-stars-how-states-use-public-money-lure-hollywood/106775924/

Philadelphia Inquirer: A $1 million clause in gaming bill for a casino

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that in a last-minute maneuver before the state Senate last month passed a sweeping expansion of casino gambling in Pennsylvania, lawmakers added a 28-word amendment, cloaked in legalese tucked halfway into the 939-page bill. Pennsylvania has 12 casinos. But that single sentence could be worth millions of dollars to one: Mount Airy Casino Resort. The bill paved the way for so-called mini-casinos to open around the state, requiring only that they be at least 25 miles from one of the larger, established gambling halls. More important, it guarantees that the Mount Pocono destination remains the closest and most accessible casino for the thousands of New Yorkers who flock each week to the commonwealth to gamble.

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/news/politics/state/mount-airy-casino-gambling-law-exemption-buffer-legislators-20171112.html

Dallas Morning News: Pain creams caused death, cost government millions

The Dallas Morning News reports the Harris County medical examiner ruled that 22-year-old Desiree Ford’s November 2014 death was caused by toxic effects of two drugs in the pain cream she used, which came from a Houston compounding pharmacy called Diamond Pharmacy. The doctor who prescribed it, Michael Kelly, never talked to or examined Ford. But he did take a kickback for writing the script, prosecutors said. Kelly and four others connected to the pharmacy were convicted of fraud in federal court in Houston for the $17 million scheme. Kelly, 71, who surrendered his medical license, died earlier this year before he could be sentenced. Federal prosecutors are bringing similar fraud cases against doctors, pharmacies and marketers from Dallas to Houston to the border. The feds say they bilked taxpayers out of millions of dollars and endangered patients with the dubious creams, some costing as much as $28,000 per container.

Read more: https://www.dallasnews.com/news/crime/2017/11/12/potent-pain-creams-sold-25k-caused-deaths-cost-government-millions

Seattle Times: County that voted for Trump shaken as immigrants disappear

The Seattle Times reports that many in Pacific County thought President Donald Trump would take away “drug dealers, criminals, rapists” with his immigration crackdown, but they were shocked to see who started to go missing. That kind of shock is reverberating throughout the county as Trump’s toughened immigration policy hits home. ICE has arrested at least 28 people in the county this year, according to numbers provided to the Sheriff’s Office. While that’s just a small share of the roughly 3,100 ICE arrests overseen by its regional office in Seattle it represents a pronounced upward trajectory. In a county of small, close-knit communities — Long Beach, population 1,400, is one of the largest — it’s noticed when someone goes missing. The number is magnified by those who have moved, gone into hiding or followed family after a deportation. People have lost neighbors, schools have lost students and businesses have lost employees.

Read more: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/northwest/fear-regrets-as-pacific-county-residents-go-missing-amid-immigration-crackdown-police-chief-neighbors-kind-of-in-shock-after-immigration-arrests-in-pacific-county-immigration-crack/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Nov. 10, 2017

AP: Russia hackers pursued Putin foes, not just US Democrats 

The Associated Press reported the hackers who disrupted the U.S. presidential election last year had ambitions that stretched across the globe, targeting the emails of Ukrainian officers, Russian opposition figures, U.S. defense contractors and thousands of others of interest to the Kremlin, according to a previously unpublished digital hit list obtained by The Associated Press. The list provides the most detailed forensic evidence yet of the close alignment between the hackers and the Russian government, exposing an operation that went back years and tried to break into the inboxes of 4,700 Gmail users — from the pope's representative in Kiev to the punk band Pussy Riot in Moscow. The targets were spread among 116 countries. The AP findings draw on a database of 19,000 malicious links collected by cybersecurity firm Secureworks, dozens of rogue emails, and interviews with more than 100 hacking targets.

Read more: https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/tech/Russia-Hackers-Putin-Foes-Not-Just-US-454747243.html

Miami Herald: Code of silence breaking on Tallahassee’s sex secrets

The Miami Herald reports that for decades, sex has been a tool and a toy for the politically powerful in the male-dominated world of politics in Florida’s capital. Now it’s a weapon. Allegations of sexual assault, sexual harassment and infidelity among the state’s legislators flew like shrapnel from a bomb blast in recent weeks, destroying much of the trust left in the Republican-controlled Legislature and replacing it with suspicion and finger pointing. The latest target, Senate Appropriations Chair Jack Latvala, was accused by six unnamed women of inappropriate touching and verbal harassment. Shortly after Politico Florida first reported the allegations, Senate President Joe Negron called them “atrocious and horrendous” and ordered an investigation. Latvala, a Clearwater Republican and candidate for governor, denied the allegations, said he welcomed the probe, and vowed a fight to “clear my name.”

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/politics-government/state-politics/article182816186.html

Chicago Tribune: Chicago sees surge in car hijackings in all neighborhoods

The Chicago Tribune reports that with gun violence garnering unflattering national attention for Chicago, carjackings have quietly gone off the charts as well. While shootings and homicides are largely concentrated in impoverished pockets of the South and West sides, carjackings are occurring throughout the city, including the downtown area, Chicago police statistics show. Last year Chicago recorded 663 carjackings, nearly double the 339 in 2015 and the most since 2009, according to the department. And the numbers have shot up even further so far this year. Through Oct. 18, the latest date available, carjackings have totaled 661, nearly equal to all of 2016 and a 44 percent spike from the same period a year ago. Carjackings started to spike last year, when homicides and shootings skyrocketed while crimes in virtually every other category rose.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-met-carjackings-rising-chicago-20171031-story.html

Arizona Daily Star: Education department misallocated millions of federal funds

The Arizona Daily Star reports that the Arizona Department of Education misallocated tens of millions of dollars from federal special-education funds that it distributed to schools in the past three years, according to a recent federal audit. The department wrongly distributed more than $35 million in federal Individual with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) funds — money aimed at paying for special-education teachers and support staff — to schools since 2015. Some schools received too much money and could be forced to repay the funds, while others received too little and will likely see a windfall in the form of repayments over the next few years. The finding comes on the heels of last week’s revelation that the department also misallocated more than $60 million in federal Title I funds designed for low-income schools.

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/local/arizona-schools-may-have-to-repay-millions-in-misallocated-special/article_a593f8d0-16a3-52cf-9cdf-66ecd44fa1e5.html

New York Times: National flood insurance program broke and broken

The New York Times reports the government-run National Flood Insurance Program is, for now, virtually the only source of flood insurance for more than five million households in the United States. This hurricane season, as tens of thousands of Americans seek compensation for storm-inflicted water damage, they face a problem: The flood insurance program is broke and broken. The program, administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has been in the red since Hurricane Katrina flooded New Orleans in 2005. It still has more than a thousand disputed claims left over from Sandy. And in October, it exhausted its $30 billion borrowing capacity and had to get a bailout just to keep paying current claims. Congress must decide by Dec. 8 whether to keep the program going.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/04/business/a-broke-and-broken-flood-insurance-program.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=first-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

Denver Post: Denver heroin users could get supervised injection site    

The Denver Post reports that in semi-private booths, each with a chair and a mirror, Denver heroin users could shoot up with clean needles, no threat of arrest and under the supervision of staff trained to jump in with a life-saving antidote in case of overdose. It would look more like a medical clinic than a party lounge, with floors and furniture that workers could hose down in the event of vomit or blood spills. Staffers would hand out sterile needles and possibly distilled water, but clients would bring their own drugs to cook and inject. It’s called a supervised injection site, and Denver is on a path to become one of the first U.S. cities to open one — although doing so would require action by the City Council, the state legislature and possibly the federal government. Seattle and San Francisco, ahead of Denver in planning, are attempting to open the first sites in this country, although there are more than 100 around the world.

Read more: http://www.denverpost.com/2017/11/05/denver-heroin-drug-users-supervised-injection-site-proposal/

Washington Post: Chasing a killer known as monkeypox

The Washington Post reports a team of American scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is traveling deep into the Congo rain forest to solve a decades-old mystery about a rare and fatal disease: monkeypox. A cousin to the deadly smallpox virus, the monkeypox virus initially infects people through contact with wild animals and can then spread from person to person. The disease produces fever and a rash that often turns into painful lesions that can feel like cigarette burns. It kills up to 1 in 10 of its victims, similar to pneumonic plague, and is particularly dangerous in children. Monkeypox is on the U.S. government list of pathogens such as anthrax and Ebola with the greatest potential to threaten human health. There is no cure. Over the past year, reports of monkeypox have flared alarmingly across Africa, one of several animal-borne diseases that have raised anxiety around the globe

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2017/national/health-science/monkeypox/?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_monkeypox%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.f1000a340da2

Courier-Journal: Call for resignation of law makers hiding sexual harassment

The Courtier-Journal reports that demands from key Republicans grew for resignations of anyone involved in a secret settlement of sexual harassment claims by GOP House Speaker Jeff Hoover as the newspaper reported more House members are alleged to be parties to the settlement. Gov. Matt Bevin, Kentucky's top Republican officeholder, led the charge at a hastily called press conference at the Capitol. "These alleged actions, which haven’t been denied, are reprehensible, indefensible and unacceptable," Bevin said. "Any elected official or state employee who has settled a sexual harassment claim should resign immediately. The people of Kentucky deserve better." Eight influential Republican House members also released an extraordinary statement demanding immediate resignations of any House member involved in the settlement. The demand came as the Courier Journal reported three other Republican lawmakers and a staff member were involved in the settlement of sexual harassment claims of a woman who works on Hoover's legislative staff.

Read more: http://www.courier-journal.com/story/news/2017/11/04/jeff-hoover-sexual-harassment-scandal-matt-bevin/832598001/

Baltimore Sun: Retailers facer new threat: Organized crime

The Baltimore Sun reports simple shoplifting is an unavoidable cost of doing business for retailers, but now, industry analysts and law enforcement officials say, a greater threat is emerging: theft and fraud by highly organized criminal rings. The high-stakes enterprises often operate across state lines. They might employ teams of “boosters” — often the homeless or the drug addicted — who go into stores to steal everything from laundry detergent and baby formula to designer clothes and diamonds. They fence stolen goods at pawn shops, kiosks, vans on the street and, increasingly, online auction sites. And they’re becoming more brazen and more dangerous, analysts say, in some cases attacking store employees and even shoppers. Organized theft has surpassed internal theft to become the leading cause of retail loss, said Robert Moraca, vice president of loss prevention for the National Retail Federation. Analysts say the increase has been fueled by the opioid epidemic and by the growing understanding among criminals that theft can be quick, easy and profitable.

Read  more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/business/bs-bz-organized-retail-crime-20171017-story.html

Dallas Morning News: How officials profited on downtown development

The Dallas Morning News reports how City Council members sat in their usual perches last December as the manager of Cedar Hill, a town southwest of Dallas, ran through the agenda and mentioned one item he called a “biggie.’’ Indeed it was big: a plan to pump millions of future tax dollars into street, water and sewer improvements for Cedar Hill’s sagging downtown. Like many other communities in fast-growing North Texas, the council would create a special tax zone — this one meant to entice an estimated $160 million in new development and boost property values in the center of town. The six council members swiftly approved the measure. But they didn’t tell the public that several town officials — including the mayor — and their families owned at least 25 properties inside the zone, an investigation by The Dallas Morning News found.

Read more: https://www.dallasnews.com/news/cedar-hill/2017/11/05/cedar-hill-officials-positioned-to-profit-on-downtown-development?extpar=dfw-m

Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel: Sham nonprofit snags and flips properties

The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reports a sham nonprofit group took advantage of lax oversight by city officials to repeatedly purchase tax foreclosed properties for $1,000. A Milwaukee Journal Sentinel investigation found that Inner City Development Project Inc. —a group that city records show falsely claimed to be certified by the IRS as a nonprofit — then sold several of the properties for quick gains, in one case making $44,000 on a north side house it bought one week earlier. Gathan Anderson, a disgraced ex-real estate broker, was involved in at least six of the sales shortly after the city sold the properties to Inner City Development, deeds show. The city routinely charges nonprofit organizations $1,000 for properties it seized through tax foreclosures with the commitment that the group will fix them up. The Journal Sentinel's discovery of the sales, which are documented in City Hall and courthouse records, has sparked frustration and anger among city officials.

Read more: http://www.jsonline.com/story/news/investigations/2017/11/03/lax-city-regulations-allow-bogus-nonprofit-snag-city-properties-sham-nonprofit-group-took-advantage/800908001/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Nov. 2, 2017

Arizona Republic: Arizona's KidsCare account is running on fumes.

The Arizona Republic reports Gov. Doug Ducey was not shy in making clear his position on repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act. But he's been quiet on another federally funded health-care program: the Children's Health Insurance Program, known in Arizona as KidsCare. It provides health coverage to kids whose families make too much to qualify for Medicaid, but not enough to buy insurance on their own. Unlike "Obamacare," as the ACA is known, CHIP has lost its funding because Congress failed to reauthorize the legislation that pays for the program by the Sept. 30 deadline. Arizona's KidsCare account is running on fumes. Boosted by an extra $22 million in leftover federal money, the program is still on track to run out of money by late November. That would force the state to kick more than 23,000 kids off the program.

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-health/2017/10/27/wallet-empty-kidscare-ducey-quietly-pushes-funding-childrens-health/796773001/

Sun Sentinel: Florida lets dangerous doctors keep practicing

The Sun Sentinel reports it has been more than nine years since Florida health regulators concluded that Dr. Barry Jack Kaplan botched a woman’s breast implants and shouldn’t practice cosmetic surgery. In the time since, he’s been accused of injuring two other women, one so seriously she had to have her nipples removed.

Florida officials finally decided a year ago to revoke Kaplan’s license – but have yet to follow through. Today, the website for Kaplan’s two cosmetic surgery centers in Central Florida highlights his medical license and boasts that he is a “leading breast augmentation doctor.” When it comes to taking action against doctors, the state of Florida takes its time – and that puts people at risk, a South Florida Sun Sentinel investigation found. Florida regularly allows doctors to continue to see, treat, and operate on people for years after accusing them of endangering patients.

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/florida/fl-florida-doctor-discipline-20171018-story.html

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Some campus cops have checkered records

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports many colleges and universities have a quality deficit when it comes to the officers they are hiring to protect students and police their campuses. An Atlanta Journal-Constitution investigation found 13 percent of the 1,413 officers working on 63 college campuses across Georgia have been fired or forced out of a previous job. That compares with about 6 percent of officers working at local county or municipal police agencies statewide, according to data obtained in March 2017 from the Georgia Peace Officer Standards and Training Council (POST). The AJC analysis comes as police agencies across the country, including schools and colleges, face heightened scrutiny from a public armed with cell phone cameras and demands for better accountability. This month, another cell phone video surfaced that raised fresh questions about the fatal police shooting of a mentally ill Georgia Tech student in September.

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/crime--law/more-than-one-campus-cops-georgia-have-checkered-records/39a9cii7tBho5WQVkyFrEO/

Chicago Tribune: Same lake, different water rates

The Chicago Tribune reports Lake Michigan water rates have been surging throughout the Chicago region in recent years, squeezing low-income residents and leaving them with little, if any, recourse. In this tangled network that delivers water to the vast majority of the region’s residents, the Tribune found an upside-down world, one where people in the poorest communities pay more for a basic life necessity than those in the wealthiest. The financial pain falls disproportionately on majority-African-American communities, where residents’ median water bill is 20 percent higher for the same amount of water than residents pay in predominantly white communities, the Tribune’s examination revealed. Consider Ford Heights, a cash-strapped, predominantly African-American suburb south of Chicago. People there pay nearly six times more for the same amount of water than residents of Highland Park, a wealthy, predominantly white town on the North Shore.

Read more: http://graphics.chicagotribune.com/news/lake-michigan-drinking-water-rates/index.html

Des Moines Register: At Iowa DHC, staffing is down while caseloads go up

The Des Moines Register reports the number of front-line child abuse staffers at Iowa’s Department of Human Services has declined in the past 15 years, caseloads have risen and state funding has failed to keep pace with inflation. With state resources unlikely to improve in the wake of continued budget shortfalls, questions are being raised about whether the agency tasked with attending to Iowa's neediest children can keep pace with increased demands for vigilance following the deaths of two teenage girls. The department reported an increase in calls to its child abuse hotline following the deaths of two Iowa teenagers, Sabrina Ray and Natalie Finn. Despite involvement from state workers, both girls were found dead in their homes — the result of apparent abuse and neglect, allegedly at the hands of their adoptive families.

Read more: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/politics/2017/10/27/iowa-dhs-staffing-has-dropped-while-caseloads-have-risen/570078001/

Arizona Daily Star: Who controls the water? Arizona agencies slug it out

The Arizona Daily Star reports that for three years, federal, state and local water officials have hunted for a solution to declining water levels at Lake Mead, a key drinking-water source for Tucson, Phoenix and their suburbs. But in the past few months, a bitter power struggle between Arizona’s two top water agencies has ground that effort to a halt. The turf war pits the Arizona Department of Water Resources, which manages water issues statewide, against the agency operating the Central Arizona Project, the 336-mile-long canal that brings Colorado River water to Tucson and Phoenix. The agencies are jockeying over a series of issues, many pointing to who controls the state’s most precious resource — and the population growth and jobs it can support. But the conflict also cuts to the heart of how Colorado River water, the lifeblood of the West, will be managed.

Read more: http://tucson.com/news/local/who-controls-the-water-arizona-agencies-slug-it-out/article_f2d01499-48d9-58e3-a35e-9ea8c6b630cd.html

Baltimore Sun: Plan to demolish Baltimore’s vacant houses lagging

The Baltimore Sun recalls that Gov. Larry Hogan stood on a blighted street in West Baltimore in January 2016 with a demolition crew ready to get to work. He had heard residents’ calls for action on the vacant row houses that pockmark the city, he said. Now he was pledging $75 million to tear thousands of them down. He would put the Maryland Stadium Authority in charge of the work. The authority, experienced in contracting, sought a firm to oversee the demolition of 4,000 units over four years. Eighteen months later, the stadium authority had spent just $5 million on the effort, the state says. Only 131 houses had been demolished. Baltimore has more than 16,000 vacant houses, the city says. With plans to tear down more buildings mired in the city’s system for approving properties for demolition, the state is turning money over to community organizations to jump-start redevelopment projects instead.

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/

Boston Globe: Bounce houses are fun but may not be as safe as you think

The Boston Globe reports that inflatable attractions like bounce houses, obstacle courses, and slides, which have increased in popularity in recent decades, may seem less ominous than roller coasters that flip riders upside down or carnival rides that send thrill-seekers whirling through the open air. But they can be just as dangerous, and in many states they are far less regulated. The estimated number of injuries on the attractions soared from 5,311 in 2003 to 17,377 in 2013, according to a Consumer Product Safety Commission report analyzing US hospital records. A Stateline analysis found that the trend continues, with an estimated 20,700 injuries last year. Only half of US states — including New Hampshire and Massachusetts — have regulations governing permits, inspections, and insurance. But even where rules are in place, a Stateline investigation found major shortcomings.

Read more: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/10/28/safety-fears-mount-bounce-house-injuries-rise/qhG1ADsWgel9fPYAud7zAI/story.html

Austin American-Statesman: Nonprofit’s ties to city hall “not improper”

The Austin American-Statesman reports that when Frank Rodriguez took a full-time job working for Austin Mayor Steve Adler in April 2015, he resigned his post atop the nonprofit he co-founded, the Latino HealthCare Forum. But four months into his new government post, Rodriguez emailed his former colleagues at the forum, which still employed his wife, with a tip: Keep an eye out for a possible contract linked to the city’s massive development and zoning code rewrite, known as CodeNext. The message was one among dozens of emails Rodriguez traded with his former colleagues at the forum since joining Adler’s staff. Rodriguez, who denied any improper ties between his work as the mayor’s aide and the nonprofit’s projects, is stepping down Friday because of health issues, a spokesman for the mayor said.

Read more: http://www.mystatesman.com/news/local-govt--politics/mayor-aide-denies-improper-ties-between-nonprofit-city-hall/vw2G74KzN9KNy8CPagKk9I/

Houston Chronicle: Charities waiting for millions pledged for Harvey relief

The Houston Chronical reports that after Hurricane Harvey made landfall Aug. 25, major corporations such as Exxon Mobil Corp., Home Depot Inc. and Kellogg Co. announced big financial pledges to help the people of Texas and Louisiana feed their families and rebuild their homes. Two months later, at least $76 million in pledges from companies, foundations and individuals still has not been delivered to the designated charities, a Houston Chronicle review found. The Chronicle canvassed 18 charities that were among the major recipients of corporate pledges. Of those, nine - including United Way Worldwide and Mayor Sylvester Turner’s Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund - disclosed the amounts promised to them versus what they have actually received.

Read more: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Millions-in-pledged-Harvey-relief-donations-still-12311398.php

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Jumps in cost, violence at youth prison

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports costs and reports of violence have both skyrocketed at the state’s troubled youth prison, raising questions about whether the institution has entered a financial tailspin. Counties already are pulling inmates out of Lincoln Hills School for Boys and Copper Lake School for Girls, threatening its funding and its future. The 34 percent cost increase — $98 more per inmate per day — and a rash of incidents may cause local officials to send even fewer teenage offenders to the Northwoods prison, which remains under a nearly three-year FBI investigation and a separate federal court order. "It's like rubbing salt in the wound a little," says Kerry Milkie, manager of the Racine County Youth and Family Division. "So we continue to look at alternatives." So does Milwaukee County, which has already cut its transfers to Lincoln Hills by nearly half over the past 20 months and wants to keep up that trend.

Read more: http://www.jsonline.com/story/news/politics/2017/10/27/jump-costs-violence-raises-questions-future-wisconsins-lincoln-hills-youth-prison/798175001/

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Oct. 26, 2017

Arizona Republic: Slapdash bidding process revealed

The Arizona Republic reports that crews, which were given 30 days to do the work, now have about a week left to finish building eight border wall prototypes. As of Friday, Sept. 20, workers had completed six. Despite logistical challenges – given six crews hurriedly working in close quarters – U.S. Customs and Border Protection said construction has gone off without a hitch. But behind that scene was the unusually confusing and haphazard process that hundreds of bidders faced as they tried to submit proposals in March and April to build these prototypes. The USA TODAY Network obtained nearly 200 pages of emails sent to and from a CBP email address that was set up in March for companies to ask questions about the bidding process. They chronicle continuous confusion over the most basic details of the process – deadlines, page counts, how to submit bids, where to submit bids and so on.

Read more: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/10/22/behind-efforts-build-prototypes-trumps-border-wall-emails-show-confusing-and-haphazard-process/787080001/

Los Angeles Times: New monuments to Confederacy being mounted in Texas 

The Los Angeles Times reports that Annette Pernell, a council member in Orange, Texas, was aghast when she heard about plans to construct a Confederate memorial that would be visible from the interstate and loom over Martin Luther King Jr. Drive. But there was nothing she or anybody else could do about it. The land was private. And so the Confederate Memorial of the Wind slowly went up on a grassy half-acre. A total of 13 concrete columns — one for each Confederate state — rise from a circular concrete pedestal. Eventually it will be surrounded by as many as 40 poles topped with Civil War battle flags. “It’s as if we’ve gone backwards,” said Pernell, who is 54 and black. “I didn’t think, at this age, I would see what I’m seeing now. A Confederate memorial is a slap in the face of all Americans, not just African Americans.”

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-new-confederate-memorials-20171020-story.html?int=lat_digitaladshouse_bx-modal_acquisition-subscriber_ngux_display-ad-interstitial_bx-bonus-story_______

Orlando Sentinel: Schools without rules

The Orlando Sentinel reports that private schools in Florida will collect nearly $1 billion in state-backed scholarships this year through a system so weakly regulated that some schools hire teachers without college degrees, hold classes in aging strip malls and falsify fire-safety and health records. The limited oversight of Florida’s scholarship programs allowed a principal under investigation for molesting a student at his Brevard County school to open another school under a new name and still receive the money, an Orlando Sentinel investigation found. Another Central Florida school received millions of dollars in scholarships, sometimes called school vouchers, for nearly a decade even though it repeatedly violated program rules, including hiring staff with criminal convictions.

Read more: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/education/os-florida-school-voucher-investigation-1018-htmlstory.html

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Unsanitary conditions at prison long ignored

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that at Augusta State Medical Prison, unsafe and unsanitary conditions have persisted for weeks, months or years, putting inmates, doctors and others at risk. Even plaintive calls for help have been ignored. Documents and photos obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution show that the Grovetown facility, the flagship of Georgia’s correctional healthcare system, is a place where state officials have allowed hazards to slide. Trash, mold, dirty floors and counters, leaking ceilings and congested corridors are just some of the issues detailed in the documents, including emails and an environmental survey, that have flagged top officials to the problems. The garbage in the hallway outside the operating room, a situation rife with the potential for infection, wasn’t resolved as of last week even though the facility’s medical director earlier this month wrote an email to her superiors expressing frustration.

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/state--regional/documents-unsanitary-conditions-long-ignored-prison-hospital/EyABXkbYrxC2JPBPsmHlnM/

Indianapolis Star: The liquor store grip on cold beer

The Indianapolis Star reports that when Indiana lawmakers swiftly closed a loophole this spring that had enabled Ricker’s convenience stores to sell cold beer, it was easy to see the hands of the liquor store industry at work. A liquor store owner raised some of the earliest objections to the Ricker’s maneuver. Liquor store lobbyists were in on key meetings with lawmakers to address it. And the final bill ultimately went through a committee chaired by a senator who is the top recipient of liquor industry campaign money. The episode was just the latest win for a liquor store industry that’s fought tenaciously for years to preserve its virtual monopoly on cold beer — and that’s deftly thwarted the expansion of Sunday alcohol sales.

Read more: https://www.indystar.com/story/news/politics/2017/10/20/liquor-store-death-grip-cold-beer-result-ofpotent-brew-money-down-home-familiarity-strong-arm-tactic/587152001/

Newark Star Ledger: N.J. offered $7 billion to Amazon. Is it worth it?

The Newark Star Ledger reports New Jersey has put a deal worth up to $7 billion in tax credits on the table to lure Amazon to the Garden State. If the company picks New Jersey as the site to develop its new HQ2 headquarters, the deal would become the second-largest economic development package ever offered to a company in the U.S., an NJ Advance Media study found. The offer is New Jersey's latest attempt to entice a corporation to the state by handing out massive tax breaks. New Jersey has handed out a total of $8.9 billion in subsidies since 1996, most of them awarded since 2010 and ending up in Camden, according to data released by Good Jobs First, a national policy resource center in Washington. It is difficult to know whether the investments, including those in Camden have paid off because a lot of the information needed to make that determination, such as the number of jobs created per subsidy awarded, is not always accessible, said Kasia Tarczynska, a research analyst with the center.

Read more: http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2017/10/holdnew_jerseys_7b_deal_offered_to_amazon_is_it_wo.html

New York Times: Why has the EPA shifted on toxic chemicals? 

The New York Times reports that the Environmental Protection Agency has struggled for years to prevent an ingredient once used in stain-resistant carpets and nonstick pans from contaminating drinking water. The chemical, perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA, has been linked to kidney cancer, birth defects, immune system disorders and other serious health problems. So scientists and administrators in the E.P.A.’s Office of Water were alarmed in late May when a top Trump administration appointee insisted upon the rewriting of a rule to make it harder to track the health consequences of the chemical, and therefore regulate it. The revision was among more than a dozen demanded by the appointee, Nancy B. Beck, after she joined the E.P.A.’s toxic chemical unit in May as a top deputy. For the previous five years, she had been an executive at the American Chemistry Council, the chemical industry’s main trade association.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/21/us/trump-epa-chemicals-regulations.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fus&action=click&contentCollection=us®ion=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=2&pgtype=sectionfront&_r=0

Cleveland Plain Dealer:  Lead poisoning progress report: Toxic neglect

The Cleveland Plain Dealer reports that two years ago its “Toxic Neglect” series revealed the scale of Cleveland's ongoing lead poisoning crisis: About 10,000 children had been poisoned over the most recent five years, there was a backlog of about 3,000 incomplete and uninvestigated city lead poisoning cases stretching back to 2003 and only one third of children who should be screened for the toxin were tested. In the immediate aftermath of the series, three of the city's four top health department officials were fired or resigned. Temporary staff was hired to investigate the backlog, and the state threatened to revoke Cleveland's authority to respond to lead poisoning cases and tightened its watch over other cities and counties as well. Two years later, the city has devoted more money and staff to investigating cases, there are new efforts aimed at boosting screening, and a fledgling program designed to prevent poisoning by identifying hazardous homes has just begun.

Read more: http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2017/10/cleveland_lead_poisoning_2_yea.html#incart_river_home#incart_target2box_default_#incart_target2box_targeted_

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Oct. 19, 2017

AP: Pro-Trump states most affected by his health care decision

The Associated Press reported President Donald Trump's decision to end a provision of the Affordable Care Act that was benefiting roughly 6 million Americans helps fulfill a campaign promise, but it also risks harming some of the very people who helped him win the presidency. Nearly 70 percent of those benefiting from the so-called cost-sharing subsidies live in states Trump won last November, according to an analysis by The Associated Press. The number underscores the political risk for Trump and his party, which could end up owning the blame for increased costs and chaos in the insurance marketplace. The subsidies are paid to insurers by the federal government to help lower consumers' deductibles and co-pays.

Read more: http://www.modbee.com/news/article178887781.html

Arizona Republic: Phoenix Public Housing Project could lose in HUD cuts

The Arizona Republic reports how for 32 years the Edison-Eastlake neighborhood has crumbled along with so many of America's public housing projects. Federal money meant to maintain the country’s 1.2 million public housing units was never enough, and a backlog built up. The National Housing Preservation Database now counts more than 84,000 units in need of immediate investment. The three Edison-Eastlake projects were stuck in America’s old approach to public housing. It is an approach that everybody from Yvonne Bridges to U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson want to leave in the past. The city of Phoenix planned to rebuild Edison-Eastlake the new way. It wanted a community where people could thrive, and to pay for it the city eyed a $30 million grant from HUD’s popular Choice Neighborhoods grant program. Then the federal government outlined next year’s budget. Its proposals shrank HUD to help pay for drastic increases in defense spending.

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/phoenix-best-reads/2017/09/28/phoenix-public-housing-projects-threatened-hud-cuts/683632001/

Santa Fe New Mexican: Ankle monitors: Pretrial supervision or punishment?

The Santa Fe News Mexican reports how James Coriz was charged with intimidating a witness during a trial but said he hadn’t threatened anyone and refused to take a plea deal. About five months later, a jury found him not guilty. But by then, Coriz says, he had paid more than $1,000 to Santa Fe County for being on an ankle monitor while awaiting his trial and had spent 21 days in jail after program officials said he’d violated the electronic monitoring agreement that governed the conditions of his release. Had he been found guilty and sentenced to time in jail, Coriz would have been given time-served credit for every day he spent on electronic monitoring, plus the 21 days he spent in jail. But after being exonerated, he got no consideration for the time and money he spent on the court-ordered ankle bracelet — not even an apology, never mind a refund. The issues surrounding electronic monitoring — legal, financial and constitutional — are deep and complex.

Read more: http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/local_news/pretrial-supervision-or-punishment/article_bf60ac9f-0cf3-56f4-a04f-41695587569d.html

Los Angeles Times: Santa Rosa suburb was exempt from fire regulations

The Los Angeles Times reports that when fire swept down the mountain, Coffey Park, a suburb of Santa Rosa, proved defenseless in its path. In a matter of hours, the neighborhood was almost totally consumed, leaving hundreds of houses burned to the ground and residents in disbelief. Surprising as it was to residents, the destruction of Coffey Park wasn’t a mystery to fire scientists. They view it as a rare, but predictable, event that has exposed flaws in the way fire risk is measured and mitigated in California. Because it was outside the officially mapped “very severe” hazard zone, more than five miles to the east, Coffey Park was exempt from regulations designed to make buildings fire resistant in high-risk areas.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-coffey-park-explainer-20171011-story.html

San Diego Union-Tribune: Slow progress against sex trafficking in San Diego

The San Diego Union-Tribune report that as the director of programs for Generate Hope, an emergency shelter for victims of sex trafficking, part of Susan Munsey’s mission is telling people just how bad the problem is in San Diego. When she gets to the number of likely victims in the county — an average of 5,000 children and adults — “there is almost always an audible gasp,” she said. The number stunned even people like her, the most seasoned prosecutors and service providers, when they first heard it. The statistics that were revealed in October 2015 as part of a study to quantify the human-trafficking problem in San Diego served as a major wake-up call. A lot of victims were clearly slipping through a lot of cracks. Two years later, has anything changed? Yes and no.

Read more: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/public-safety/sd-me-sex-trafficking-20171013-story.html#nt=oft12aH-2gp2

Washington Post: The drug industry’s triumph over the DEA

The Washington Post reports that in April 2016, at the height of the deadliest drug epidemic in U.S. history, Congress effectively stripped the Drug Enforcement Administration of its most potent weapon against large drug companies suspected of spilling prescription narcotics onto the nation’s streets. By then, the opioid war had claimed 200,000 lives, more than three times the number of U.S. military deaths in the Vietnam War. Overdose deaths continue to rise. There is no end in sight. A handful of members of Congress, allied with the nation’s major drug distributors, prevailed upon the DEA and the Justice Department to agree to a more industry-friendly law, undermining efforts to stanch the flow of pain pills, according to an investigation by The Washington Post and “60 Minutes.” The DEA had opposed the effort for years.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2017/investigations/dea-drug-industry-congress/?utm_term=.1ec459e7479c&hpid=hp_hp-banner-main_deanarrative-hed%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

Miami Herald: Fight Club: Investigating Florida’s juvenile justice system

The Miami Herald reports Florida’s Department of Juvenile Justice calls its philosophy “tough love.” But a Miami Herald I-Team analysis of 10 years of seldom-seen records reveals an emphasis on the “tough.” Documents, interviews and surveillance videos show a disturbing pattern of beatings doled out or ordered by underpaid officers, hundreds of them prison system rejects. Youthful enforcers are rewarded with sweet pastries from the employee vending machines, a phenomenon known as “honey-bunning.” The Herald found fights staged for entertainment, wagering and to exert control, sex between staff and youthful detainees and a culture of see-nothing/say-nothing denial. Herald journalists also examined 12 questionable deaths of detained youths since 2000. In the end, untold numbers of already troubled youths have been further traumatized.

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/special-reports/florida-prisons/article176773291.html

Honolulu Star Advertiser: “Aging in place” facilities trigger debate

The Honolulu Star Advertiser reports that over the past two years, dozens of unlicensed residential facilities offering elder care have opened in neighborhoods around Hawaii, embracing a new model that its proponents herald as safe, effective and the wave of the future. But critics contend the homes flout state law and circumvent oversight designed to protect vulnerable seniors. The debate over these businesses, called “aging in place” facilities, is expected to be taken to lawmakers in the upcoming state legislative session and likely will trigger broader discussions about the state’s ability — some say inability — to effectively oversee an industry that needs to grow substantially to care for Hawaii’s mushrooming elder population.

Read more: http://www.staradvertiser.com/2017/10/15/hawaii-news/aging-in-place-facilities-trigger-debate/?HSA=e3914d11ae6a8e98fd742f3a01332a7115076312

Indianapolis Star: Analysis of liquor stores shows surprising underage sales

The Indianapolis Star reports liquor stores sell to minors at a higher rate than other retailers, undermining a core argument used to justify the liquor store industry's virtual monopoly on cold beer sales. An IndyStar analysis of data from excise police compliance checks found liquor stores improperly sold to minors at twice the rate of convenience stores and three times the rate of pharmacies and big-box retailers.

That contradicts liquor store claims that their stores — with prominent signs warning customers must be 21 or older to enter — are best equipped to keep booze from underage buyers. The finding also flies in the face of what key lawmakers have been led to believe for years — and have left unchallenged.

Read more: https://www.indystar.com/story/news/politics/2017/10/10/liquor-store-grip-cold-beer-could-slip-if-record-protecting-minors-taken-inew-data-taken-into-accoun/587121001/

Minnesota Star-Tribune: Millions spent on patients who don’t need help 

The Minnesota Star-Tribune reports that Minnesota taxpayers have shelled out more than $92 million over the past six years to house patients who no longer require mental health treatment at a state hospital but have nowhere else to go. The cost per patient, according to Department of Human Services records, now tops $1,300 a day – enough to rent an apartment in a Minneapolis for a month. The rising toll is largely hidden but a stark sign of gaps in the state’s mental health safety net, particularly for Minnesotans accused of a crime but deemed mentally unfit to face the charges. Courts now send those patients primarily to a state hospital in Anoka. But once doctors there say the treatment is complete, there is often no place for them to transition back to society.     

Read more: http://www.startribune.com/minnesota-spends-90-million-on-mental-health-costs-for-patients-who-don-t-need-the-treatment/450926783/

Kansas City Star: Gun owners are making it easy to steal guns

The Kansas City Star reports there has been an unprecedented and alarming rash of gun thefts citywide in Kansas City since 2016, according to electronic police records it has obtained. The number of annual firearms thefts rose from 496 to 588 between 2008 and 2015, but it exploded in 2016. Thieves stole 804 a year ago — a 37 percent increase. And they are on pace to steal some 830 firearms in 2017. Too many gun owners are only making it easy for criminals to propel Kansas City’s harrowing gun violence. Too many are stowing their guns carelessly in cars, not securing them in locked boxes, and failing to record serial numbers to help law enforcement if they are stolen.

Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/article178702531.html

St. Louis Post Dispatch: Farmers divide over dicamba

The St. Louis Post Dispatch reports that cupped and crinkled soybean leaves were a common sight across millions of acres of the nation’s farmland this year. The distinctive symptoms point to exposure to dicamba, a decades-old chemical the agriculture industry is now turning to in the fight against increasingly stubborn “superweeds” — a controversial shift that has borne different results for different farmers and left the agriculture community divided. The damage has been widespread across the Farm Belt, causing conflicts between neighbors, recriminations and lawsuits, culminating with the Environmental Protection Agency announcing that increased regulatory oversight will be required for dicamba applications in 2018. Sparking the controversy was a shift to new technology spearheaded by Monsanto, the seeds and traits giant that, for years, has counted the herbicide, Roundup, as its signature product.

Read more: http://www.stltoday.com/business/local/farmers-divide-over-dicamba/article_fa3ba16e-10ef-5220-b1a0-71a84bcd7668.html#tncms-source=home-top-story-1

New York Times: Wary of hackers, states upgrade voting systems

The New York Times reports state election officials, worried about the integrity of their voting systems, are pressing to make them more secure ahead of next year’s midterm elections. Reacting in large part to Russian efforts to hack the presidential election last year, a growing number of states are upgrading electoral databases and voting machines, and even adding cybersecurity experts to their election teams. The efforts — from both Democrats and Republicans — amount to the largest overhaul of the nation’s voting infrastructure since the contested presidential election in 2000 spelled an end to punch-card ballots and voting machines with mechanical levers. One aim is to prepare for the 2018 and 2020 elections by upgrading and securing electoral databases and voting machines that were cutting-edge before Facebook and Twitter even existed.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/14/us/voting-russians-hacking-states-.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=first-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

WATCHDOG REPORTING: SUMMARY OF IMPACT JOURNALISM FROM PAST WEEK • Oct. 12, 2017

AP: Is NRA move to regulate “bump stocks” real or a ruse?

The Associated Press reported that when the National Rifle Association urged the government to revisit whether "bump stocks" should be restricted, it immediately raised eyebrows. Why would the nation's leading gun-rights organization, not known for compromise, be willing to bend even just a bit when it wields perhaps more influence than ever? Some gun-industry experts say the NRA's move is little more than a ruse to stall any momentum for wider gun control until outrage over the Las Vegas attack subsides. It also carries little risk. For one, it's rare for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to reverse course without a change in the law. For another, "bump stocks" are not big moneymakers for the gun industry. And by seeking an administrative change, rather than a new law, the NRA allows its supporters in Congress to avoid going on the record with a vote.

Read more: http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/nra-move-regulate-bump-stocks-real-ruse-50334558

Los Angeles Times: Trump’s pro-gun stance is new. Will Las Vegas change that?

The Los Angeles Times reports the pro-gun community had reason to be suspicious of Donald Trump. He wrote in favor of an assault weapons ban and a “slightly longer” waiting period before gun purchases in a 2000 book, and accused Republicans of walking “the NRA line.” And even as he rebranded himself a “2nd Amendment maven” in 2013, he sounded conflicted, suggesting he favored expanded background checks. No one on either side of the gun debate seems to know exactly when or why Trump shifted. But they agree that the mogul from Manhattan has become one of the most forceful pro-gun presidents in decades. Now, after the worst mass shooting in American history, Trump faces a gut-check moment on guns.

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/sns-bc-us--las-vegas-shooting-nra-20171006-story.html

New York Times: The “Resistance,” raising Big Money, Upends Liberal Politics

The New York Times reports that it started as a scrappy grass-roots protest movement against President Trump, but now the so-called resistance is attracting six- and seven-figure checks from major liberal donors, posing an insurgent challenge to some of the left’s most venerable institutions — and the Democratic Party itself. The jockeying between groups, donors and operatives for cash and turf is occurring mostly behind the scenes. But it has grown acrimonious at times, with upstarts complaining they are being boxed out by a liberal establishment that they say enables the sort of Democratic timidity that paved the way for the Trump presidency. If the newcomers prevail, they could pull the party further to the left, leading it to embrace policy positions like those advocated by Mr. Sanders, including single-payer health care and free tuition at public colleges.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/07/us/politics/democrats-resistance-fundraising.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=first-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

San Francisco Chronicle: Prosecution of police sex scandal sees little success

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that in the year since Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O’Malley filed criminal charges against six East Bay law enforcement officers for what she called their “morally reprehensible” actions in Oakland’s sexual misconduct scandal, the most severe punishment handed down has been a $390 fine and three years of court probation. Half of the cases have been dismissed or their charges dropped due to insufficient evidence. Two cases were plea bargained, and one awaits trial. Critics who wanted to see greater consequences wonder whether the district attorney’s office mishandled the scandal. Some say the prosecution was frivolous.

Read more: http://www.sfchronicle.com/crime/article/Prosecution-of-Oakland-police-sex-exploitation-12259732.php

Denver Post: Water drying up as farmers keep irrigating desert

The Denver Post reports that Colorado farmers who defied nature’s limits and nourished a pastoral paradise by irrigating drought-prone prairie are pushing ahead in the face of worsening environmental fallout: Overpumping of groundwater has drained the High Plains Aquifer to the point that streams are drying up at the rate of 6 miles a year. The drawdown has become so severe that highly resilient fish are disappearing, evidence of ecological collapse. A Denver Post analysis of federal data shows the aquifer shrank twice as fast over the past six years compared with the previous 60. While the drying out of America’s agricultural bread basket ($35 billion in crops a year) ultimately may pinch people in cities, it is hitting rural areas hardest.

Read more: http://www.denverpost.com/2017/10/08/colorado-eastern-plains-groundwater-running-dry/

Washington Post: Fired/rehired: Three shootings in three years

The Washington Post reports how most police officers will never fire their weapons while on duty, but Cyrus Mann, a nine-year member of the Philadelphia Police Department, shot three people in just over three years. The shooting in an alley, on Aug. 9, 2012, would prove fatal and prompt the police commissioner to try to fire Mann. Like many police chiefs across the nation, he would fail. A Washington Post investigation found that hundreds of police officers who were fired for misconduct, including allegations of sexual assault and drug trafficking, have been reinstated. Since 2006, at least 451 of 1,800 officers fired from 37 of the nation’s largest departments have won their jobs back through appeals provided for in union contracts.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2017/investigations/fired-rehired-three-shootings-in-three-years/?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories_mannrevised-711pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.05a77f627c5d

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Bribery, corruption scandal looms over mayor’s race

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports a guilty plea in federal court and an FBI raid on a long-time city vendor are reshaping the Atlanta mayor’s race by throwing a white-hot spotlight back on the City Hall bribery investigation, just one month before voters choose Kasim Reed’s successor. Most of the major candidates have weaponized the scandal in their stump speeches and at forums since the federal probe netted a guilty plea from the city’s top purchasing official two weeks ago. Tough talk on ethics and procurement reform have joined pledges about affordable housing and transportation, issues that were driving the campaign’s early days. The mayor himself has been forced to defend his record and issue regular statements about how he’s cooperating with the probe.

Read more: http://www.myajc.com/news/local-govt--politics/bribery-corruption-scandal-looms-over-atlanta-mayor-race/IEM9S4tg00iWGJg8QL3ZIK/

Des Moines Register: Companies write off millions. Taxpayers reap little benefit

The Des Moines Register reports that a Polk County middle manager signed a nondescript sheet of paper last year attesting to heating and cooling work the Waldinger Corp. performed in 2012 on the county-owned Iowa Events Center. That paper wiped $1.1 million off the Des Moines-based mechanical contractor’s federal income tax liability. What did taxpayers get in return? Nothing they hadn't already paid for. The Events Center example is hardly unique. The Des Moines Register examined 70 Iowa projects in which the tax break was sought and documented 37 cases where governments gained little or nothing for authorizing the deduction on taxpayer-funded construction. That's just a tiny sample of more than 10,000 cases nationally in all 50 states — including at least 300 in Iowa — in which government officials have handed out tax breaks to private companies through an obscure giveaway known as the Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Tax Deduction.

Read more: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/investigations/2017/10/06/tax-deduction-nothing-private-companifederal-energy-efficiency-break-often-yields-no-taxpayer-benefi/456708001/

Courier-Journal: University of Louisville Athletic director highest paid in US

The Courier-Journal reports that suspended University of Louisville athletic director Tom Jurich was the highest paid in the land. Over the past seven years, through a byzantine array of longevity and performance bonuses, base pay raises and tax subsidies, Jurich collected total compensation of $19,279,710, an average of $2.76 million per year.

Last year, his taxable income – enriched by the vesting of a $1.8 million annuity plus $1.6 million from the university to pay his taxes on it – totaled $5.3 million. Although the annuity was earned over several years and will be paid out in $200,000 installments, his listed income last year was more than the university budgeted for its departments of biology ($3.3 million), English ($4 million), history ($2.4 million) or mathematics ($3.5 million).

Read more: http://www.courier-journal.com/story/sports/college/louisville/2017/10/05/university-louisville-tom-jurich-high-pay-unusual-perks/728901001/

Rochester Democrat and Chronicle: University investigates but lawsuit expected

The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle reports that trustees at the University of Rochester have hired Debevoise & Plimpton, one of the nation's priciest law firms, to investigate claims of sexual harassment and retaliation on campus. There is plenty of documentation to sort through, and that is where such investigations begin, experts say. But the review also faces obstacles — lacking cooperation from accusers, and needing to maneuver around myriad confidentiality and legal concerns. Meanwhile, a lawsuit appears imminent. The scope of the inquiry is broad, encompassing the whole of events that surround embattled professor Florian Jaeger and UR's Brain and Cognitive Sciences (BCS) department. Jaeger allegedly had sex and used illegal drugs with students, made inappropriate and humiliating comments to and about female students and faculty, pressured them to meet with him alone, and conditioned access with being part of his social circle.

Read more: http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/2017/10/07/ur-investigation-running-night-and-day-but-lawsuit-expected-thanksgiving/733173001/

Seattle Times: City Light has paid $7.8 million to company of off-duty cops

The Seattle Times reports a retired Seattle police officer’s private company has exclusively billed Seattle City Light more than $7.8 million over the past five years to provide off-duty police officers for traffic control or security work, according to billing data obtained by the newspaper. The company, Seattle’s Finest Security & Traffic Control, has been chosen by utility crew chiefs for every job, even though another company, Seattle Security, also provides off-duty officers, the records show. Details of the lucrative relationship between Seattle’s Finest and City Light come at a time the FBI is investigating allegations of price-fixing and intimidation in the hiring of off-duty officers directing traffic at parking garages and construction sites. The allegations, made by a new startup company, Blucadia, and echoed by some downtown business owners, have renewed longstanding concerns about a murky off-duty employment arrangement controlled by few companies with little oversight.

Read more: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/seattle-city-light-has-paid-7-8m-to-off-duty-cops-in-unusual-relationship/

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