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APME Update • Conference bonus and Jacobsen remembered
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APME UPDATE • JUNE 22, 2017

 

 

SAVE THE DATE

 

July 24, 2017: Deadline to enter to have an evening with the Austailian ambassedor at the ASNE-APME-APPM News Leadership conference. Must register for conference and three nights hotel. Details below.

July 27, 2016: Deadline to enter

Oct. 8-11, 2017: ASNE-APME News Leadership Conference, Washington, D.C.
Oct. 14, 2017: NewsTrain workshop in Beverly, Massachusetts

Oct. 21, 2017: NewsTrain workshop in Columbus, Ohio
Nov. 11, 2017: NewsTrain workshop in Seattle

 


2017 Conference logoRegister early, party with Australian ambassador

Party with Joe Hockey, Australian ambassador to the United States, on the evening of Oct. 10 at his beautiful residence!We will have cocktails, snacks and some quality time for a Q&A and other fun, engaging conversations. This stand-up reception, limited to 80 people on a first-come, first-served basis, is open to those who are registered and made a hotel reservation for the ASNE-APME News Leadership Conference Oct. 8-11 in Washington, D.C. Register soon if you want to join the crowd!

Also, register for the conference and reserve at least a three-night hotel stay by July 8 if you'd like to win one of two $300 Amazon gift cards!

The conference, which focuses on the intersection of journalism and citizenship, will kick off on the evening of Sunday, Oct. 8, and conclude by noon Wednesday, Oct. 11. Our conference hotel is the Washington Marriott Wardman Park, at 2660 Woodley Road NW. The reception with the ambassador will be from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 10, at 3120 Cleveland Ave. NW, about a 15-minute walk from the Marriott.

Some highlights of the conference:

Pre-conference workshop on building trust through community engagement

From 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 8, this free workshop will address the role of community engagement for news organizations and how to build trust with their audiences and communities. Best practices and examples of community engagement will be incorporated. Attendees will emerge from the workshop better equipped to engage readers and strengthen trust in quality journalism.

Two lunch keynotes

Leonard Pitts Jr., Miami Herald Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, is our keynote speaker for Monday, Oct. 9. He will talk about current events in Washington.

On Tuesday, Oct. 10, we will hear from Campbell Brown, chief of news partnership and engagement at Facebook. She will discuss Facebook's relationship with news organizations, and news itself.

Diversity session on recruitment and retention

Need more diversity in your newsroom? Get quick tips from industry leaders. This panel takes a fresh look at recruiting and retaining journalists of color in the digital age. Our experts will provide insight on today's journalism graduates and talented folks with potential working in the digital space. How do we retain journalists of color who are worried about the future and are tempted to seek employment in public relations, academia and other "more stable" professions?

Confirmed panelists:
• Katrice Hardy, editor of The Greenville News ?and USA TODAY southeast regional editor
• Carlos Sanchez, editor of the McAllen (Texas) Monitor
• Peter Bhatia, editor and vice president of The Cincinnati Enquirer and Ohio editor of the USA TODAY Network
• Karen Magnuson (moderator), editor and vice president of news at the Rochester (New York) Democrat and Chronicle

 Centering on economic diversity, this session will feature Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Connie Schultz, who calls Cleveland home; Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley; and author and political commentator J.D. Vance, who wrote "Hillbilly Elegy" about the rise of Appalachian values.

White House media relations

This session features Major Garrett, CBS News chief White House correspondent; Jeff Ballou, Al Jazeera Media Network news editor and president of the National Press Club; and Tom Rosenstiel, executive director of the American Press Institute.

Fake news and political reporting

This session showcases Liz Spayd, The New York Times public editor; Margaret Sullivan, The Washington Post media columnist; April Ryan (invited), American Urban Radio Network White House correspondent; and DeWayne Wickham, Morgan State University journalism dean. We've also invited President Donald Trump and The Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson.

Awards celebration

Winners of the 2017 ASNE Awards and the 2017 APME Awards will be recognized at a reception on the afternoon of Tuesday, Oct. 10.

Registration

To register for the main conference: The registration fee is $275 for members of ASNE and APME and $375 for nonmembers. Those who register and book their hotel rooms for at least three nights by Saturday, July 8, will be entered into a drawing for a $300 Amazon gift card. We'll draw two winners. Special rates are also available for retired members, spouses, students and APME's Regents. Lunch tickets for Monday, Oct. 9, and Tuesday, Oct. 10, can be purchased during registration.

Register early, party with Australian ambassador

To register for the Oct. 8 pre-conference workshop and/or the Oct. 10 reception at the Australian ambassador's residence: Email APME at apmeconference@ap.org or, if registering with ASNE, contact Jiyoung Won at jwon@asne.org.Both the workshop and reception have limited space and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis to those who are registered to attend the conference. Those attending the reception also need to book their rooms at the Marriott.

To book your hotel room: A terrific group rate is available at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park for $249/night Friday, Oct. 6, through Wednesday, Oct. 11. Reservations must be made by 6 p.m. EDT Friday, Sept. 15. Make a reservation online here.

A draft of the conference schedule is coming soon at asne.org and apme.com. Questions? Please contact APME at apmeconference@ap.org or Jiyoung Won at ASNE.


International Perspective award to bear Sally Jacobsen's name

The Associated Press Media Editors have voted to name its longstanding International Perspective award after a former longtime executive director, Sally Jacobsen, starting this year. Efforts are underway to endow this award and contributors to this effort are encouraged to apply by emailing Sarah Nordgren. Sally was an integral component to APME's current path assisting newsroom leaders, advocating for a free press and partnering with the Associated Press. She mentored many on the board and in the Associated Press and beyond.

APME President Bill Church of Gatehouse Media said, "Sally's impact on journalism, the AP and APME will be remembered through the International Perspective awards named in her honor. We miss Sally, and she won't be forgotten."

In addition to her family and her dogs, Sally's passions were international reporting and the AP Stylebook, and she shaped the current state of both profoundly. Starting with this year's honorees, the award will be renamed the "Sally Jacobsen Award for International Perspective."

The Overseas Press Club is celebrating Sally through the Sally Jacobsen Scholarship Fund, which many of us will contribute to personally. APME future President Jim Simon is a product of one of the OCP scholarships, so please help make this a sustainable endowment. If you would like to to hear journalist speak about Sally and her amazing personality and mentorship at the AP memorial, look here.


Quick survey: What do you want to know about digital journalism, and how do you want to learn it?

Linda Austin, project director for APME’s NewsTrain, is working on a project to make training in digital journalism more accessible, and she needs your help.

By June 27, please take three to five minutes to answer her survey about what you want to know about digital journalism and how you want to learn it.

You might even win $50.

This survey is the first step in her project as a 2017-18 Reynolds Journalism Institute Fellow at the University of Missouri. Her goal is to come up with the first course — of what will hopefully be many — that will lead journalists step-by-step through what they need to know in social, video, data and other digital skills.

She’s looking at teaching these digital skills to time-starved journalists by delivering bite-sized lessons on smartphones.

By June 27, please help her by responding to the survey and sharing this link – bit.ly/digijsurvey – with your newsroom to take it.

Participants will be entered in a drawing for $50 gift cards.

Thanks for your help!

TAKE THE SURVEY!


Apply soon for APME’s Community Journalism Initiative for smaller news media

The sixth year of the Associated Press Media Editors’ Community Journalism Public Service Initiative continues to emphasize the important work of smaller news organizations and their impact on U.S. communities.

Because of generous grants from the Park and APME foundations, the initiative will award grants of $2,500 to two news organizations again this year to help them complete projects important to their communities. The winners will also receive an expense-paid trip to send a representative to present at the ASNE-APME-APPM News Leadership Conference Oct. 8-11 in Washington.

However, news organizations must apply by July 24 to be considered.

LEARN MORE AND APPLY


GREAT IDEAS

Simple startup for creating podcasts, Peoria (Illinois) Journal Star

Mobile is our fastest-growing audience; 65 percent of our digital audience is mobile, up from 40 percent 18 months ago. And there isn’t a more mobile medium than podcasts.

Podcasts let you interact with the audience on their terms, listening while they eat breakfast, work out at the gym or on their commute.

We launched our podcast operation in spring 2016. For a digital endeavor, it was a relatively inexpensive project of $400 for a mixer, four microphones, headphones and a headphone distributor.

It also helped to have a handful of people in the newsroom who are enthusiastic about the medium, and several more who became enthusiastic after the podcasts were launched.

In the past year, we’ve created 130 episodes, a little over two per week.

Between our podcast app and our website, we’ve had 40,000 downloads. About 20 percent of the downloads are on the app.

We also have a regular sponsor -- a local plumbing company.

It’s not a lot of money, but the podcasts bring value to our newspaper brand, lending our reporters’ and editors’ voice, experience and engagement with a non-traditional newspaper reader.

It also doesn’t require much time to record or produce the podcasts.

There’s little editing involved, other than adding the sponsor’s ad. And, in many cases, these are conversations that are happening in the newsroom anyway, we just happen to record them.

SUBMIT YOUR GREAT IDEA OR SEE OTHERS


WATCHDOG REPORTING

New York Times: Opioid dealers embrace internet to mail deadly drugs
Santa Fe New Mexican: U.S. 550 has a reputation as a “killing zone”
Washington Post: Drug crisis raises death rate for all groups of Americans
Des Moines Register: Iowa’s oaks are sick and some blame farm chemicals
Boston Globe: Hospital for mentally ill systematically fails trusting families
Minneapolis Star Tribune: A fight to expose quality-of-care investigations
Kansas City Star: Kansans consider corpse of governor’s tax plan
Columbus Dispatch: Lawmakers benefit from business tax cuts they created
The Sacramento Bee: Victims say firefighters waited too long to make arrest
Chicago Tribune: Property taxes harmed the poor and helped the rich
Arizona Daily Star: Sheriff’s department exceeds OT budget by $2 million
Austin American-Statesman: When police restraint turns fatal

READ MORE


EDITORS IN THE NEWS

AP names Julie Pace as its new Washington chief of bureau

The Associated Press has named White House Correspondent Julie Pace as its new chief of bureau in Washington. She will direct the news cooperative's coverage of the presidency, politics and the U.S. government during a time of intense global interest. In her new role, announced Monday, June 12, Pace will remain AP's leading voice on Washington and American politics, delivering the same aggressive news reporting and insightful analysis that has defined her tenure as the news organization's senior reporter at the White House and on the 2016 campaign. "We are in an era that demands the strongest, most deeply reported, accurate and credible journalism," said Sally Buzbee, AP senior vice president and executive editor. "Julie is uniquely qualified to lead that effort. Her leadership, commitment and integrity are of the highest caliber."

Read more: https://www.ap.org/ap-in-the-news/2017/ap-names-julie-pace-as-its-new-washington-chief-of-bureau

Richmond Times-Dispatch names new managing editor

The newspaper in Virginia's capital city has a new managing editor. The Richmond Times-Dispatch announced Tuesday, June 6, that Mike Szvetitz has been named to the position as the newsroom's No. 2 editor. He will handle day-to-day newsroom operations, oversee reporters and editors and report to Executive Editor Paige Mudd. Szvetitz has worked as the newspaper's sports editor for the last 2 1⁄2 years.
The 38-year-old Pennsylvania native came to Richmond after serving for a decade as the sports editor of the Opelika-Auburn News. He started his career as a high school sports reporter for Highlands Today in Sebring, Florida. Szvetitz is taking over for Brice


OPEN RECORDS, FREEDOM OF INFORMATION and FIRST AMENDMENT

What officers found when they investigated carnival electrocution
Ohio chief justice pursues study of judges' workloads

LEARN MORE DETAILS


INDUSTRY NEWS

Latvian man extradited to US in alleged hacking scheme
Fired Fox executive calls lawsuit against her a 'money grab'
New Alabama governor hires PR firm to help get message out
First Amendment lawyer defending neo-Nazi website publisher
Trump's social media director receives ethics warning
Al-Jazeera a target in Gulf confrontation with Qatar
Chelsea Manning talks leaks, transition after prison release
Comey's release of Trump memo to newspaper draws criticism
Coverage of Comey testimony plays out with partisan spin
Gianforte apologizes to reporter for assault before election
Advocate for women and girls wins photojournalism award
How news networks plan to cover Comey's testimony
Newspaper objects to candidate's use of fake front pages
Young journalists honored with national Livingston Awards
US contractor arrested after leak of Russia hacking report

READ MORE ABOUT IT


IN MEMORIAM

Tom Eblen, former Kansas City Star editor and newspaper man, dies at 80

Tom Eblen, former longtime Kansas City Star editor and University of Kansas journalism educator, died Saturday at age 80. He had been ill for some time, family members said. During a career that spanned more than 50 years, Eblen worked at The Star as a reporter, copy editor, city editor, and managing editor before moving on to serve as the general manager at the Fort Scott Tribune. He then spent more than 15 years as the general manager and news adviser for KU’s student newspaper, The University Daily Kansan. He served two terms on the APME board of directors and was editor of APME News in 1978 and ’79. Born in St. Joseph in 1936, Eblen graduated from the University of Missouri and worked at the Columbia Missourian and the Amarillo Daily News in Texas before arriving at The Star, where he rose to the position of managing editor in the 1970s. Former Star reporters remember him fondly.

Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/article155521984.html

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